6th August

FJ Williams Profile Picture
FJW 1955-2007
CH Williams Profile Picture
CHW 2015-
JC Williams Profile Picture
JCW 1897-1939
C Williams Profile Picture
CW 1940-1955

2017 – CHW

Eucomis have leaf tufts at the top of the flower spikes. Here they are!

Eucomis
Eucomis
Eucomis
Eucomis
Cantua boxifolia grown over a wall so the trumpet flowers show up when they hang from its arching branches.
Cantua boxifolia
Cantua boxifolia
Dierama pulcherrimum – seeds formed already on this fine clump although some flowers are still out.
Dierama pulcherrimum
Dierama pulcherrimum
Dierama pulcherrimum
Dierama pulcherrimum
Dierama pulcherrimum
Dierama pulcherrimum
Dierama pulcherrimum
Dierama pulcherrimum
Dierama pulcherrimum
Dierama pulcherrimum
Acacia baileyana – 15-18ft tall.
Acacia baileyana
Acacia baileyana
Acacia baileyana
Acacia baileyana
Acacia baileyana
Acacia baileyana
Grevillea rosemarinifolia – a rather tired old plant.
Grevillea rosemarinifolia
Grevillea rosemarinifolia
Grevillea rosemarinifolia
Grevillea rosemarinifolia
Ophiopogon planiscapus ‘Nigrescens’ with flowers! I had never noticed any before.
Ophiopogon planiscapus ‘Nigrescens’
Ophiopogon planiscapus ‘Nigrescens’
Ophiopogon planiscapus ‘Nigrescens’
Ophiopogon planiscapus ‘Nigrescens’
Grevillea johnsonii – I am gobsmacked by this superb plant every year!
Grevillea johnsonii
Grevillea johnsonii
Grevillea johnsonii
Grevillea johnsonii
Carya ovata with large fruits on a hot bank.
Carya ovata
Carya ovata
Carya ovata
Carya ovata
Carya ovata
Carya ovata
Carya ovata
Carya ovata
More Clerodendron bungei suckers.
Clerodendron bungei
Clerodendron bungei
Fruit on Cornus mas. Looks edible but not sure?
Cornus mas
Cornus mas
Cornus mas
Cornus mas
Pyrus x michauxii with small pears. A record tree here.
Pyrus x michauxii
Pyrus x michauxii
Pyrus x michauxii
Pyrus x michauxii
Pyrus x michauxii
Pyrus x michauxii
Pyrus x michauxii
Pyrus x michauxii
Hoheria angustifolia in full flower.
Hoheria angustifolia
Hoheria angustifolia
Hoheria angustifolia
Hoheria angustifolia
Hoheria angustifolia
Hoheria angustifolia
Correa bachhousiana with its first two flowers out very early and loads of buds to come
Correa bachhousiana
Correa bachhousiana
Correa bachhousiana
Correa bachhousiana
Correa bachhousiana
Correa bachhousiana
Morus nigra just ripening.
Morus nigra
Morus nigra

2016 – CHW
This is the fuchsia purchased on the Isle of Wight for propagation. Fuchsia ‘Lady Bacon’ is not a climber like our Fuchsia ‘Lady Boothby’ which is. It appears to be a Fuchsia magellanica variety which is entirely hardy and may well not die down at all in the winter. An attractive colour combination with the red corolla fading to blueish-purple. I cannot find this one in my reference books. It will be a nice new entry in the catalogue one day.
Fuchsia ‘Lady Bacon’
Fuchsia ‘Lady Bacon’
Fuchsia ‘Lady Bacon’
Fuchsia ‘Lady Bacon’
Fuchsia ‘Lady Bacon’
Fuchsia ‘Lady Bacon’

2015 – CHW

A plant in the Higher Quarry Nursery has been another identity puzzle. A deciduous small tree or large shrub with striated bark and long panicles of white flowers in mid summer. Since this nursery bed has been in existence for around 100 years this plant looks as though it was one of those things too rare or obscure ever to get planted out. So it has sat undisturbed and unadmired ever since.

Lyonia ovalifolia
Lyonia ovalifolia

After much head scratching and research Jim Gardiner and Roy Lancaster thought it was a LYONIA; supposedly an American plant. However the reference books list four species of lyonia of which two are from the US and two are Chinese. Mr Lyon was a north American plant hunter who died in 1818 so Jim was nearly right!

It is possible that a US species did come to Caerhays perhaps from the Arnold Arboretum. However, far more likely is that it is a Chinese introduction. Forrest collected Lyonia macrocalyx in 1924 and Bean says plants were raised at Trewithen. He also collected Lyonia ovalifolia in Yunnan in 1930 to 1931 under F30956.

Today’s quest is to see if it is in flower and to nail down its identity or, rather, to confirm Susyn Andrews’ 2011 identification. From the size of the plant it grows larger than any of the other species of lyonia so should be Lyonia ovalifolia.

Sadly no flowers, remains of flower heads or seedpods – this year’s or last. The terminal buds may be flowers or secondary new growth or it may just not be flowering. The plant is well over 20 ft tall now with four separate trunks and many suckers from ground level and up the main stem. All I can show you today is therefore bark, leaf form and habit. The reference books say it flowers in July but I suspect later. The good evening’s rain has bucked up the young rhodos transplanted this year into the nursery. A wonderful shaded and sheltered environment partly due to the lyonia.

Lyonia ovalifolia
Lyonia ovalifolia
Lyonia ovalifolia
Lyonia ovalifolia
Lyonia ovalifolia
Lyonia ovalifolia

1940 – CW
Aunt Charlotte to tea, she saw Eucryphia nymansensis at its best – pinnatifolia past but not over – cordifolia just coming to be good and can be seen from front door. Several Auriculatum hybrids still good – an azalea (red) under Denudata seedling nice. Very nice hydrangea on top of Donkey Shoe nursery. Mag delavayi, I find a much finer flower at dawn – clearly opens at night.

1915 – JCW
Buddleia veitchii wanes. Myrtles good. R decorum nice. R auriculatum opening.

1906 – JCW
Sweet peas and tea roses good, leaving for Scotland.

1900 – JCW
Some lapageria flowers open.

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