2nd June

FJ Williams Profile Picture
FJW 1955-2007
CH Williams Profile Picture
CHW 2015-
JC Williams Profile Picture
JCW 1897-1939
C Williams Profile Picture
CW 1940-1955

2017 – CHW

The Great Gardens of Cornwall meeting today is at Lamorran Gardens above St Mawes. 35 years ago when Burncoose worked on a project here it was all exposed to the elements. Today the garden is shrouded in dense growth and small damp glades of exotic, rare and tender plants which you seldom, if ever, see surviving outside the greenhouse. A unique and wonderful plantsman’s paradise and the smallest of the genuinely Great Gardens of Cornwall.

We have a quick tour after the meeting:

The tallest and largest Clianthus puniceus I have ever seen which has been flowering since January.

Clianthus puniceus
Clianthus puniceus
Clianthus puniceus
Clianthus puniceus
A cruise ship waiting off Falmouth docks from a vantage point in the garden.
A cruise ship
A cruise ship
Fuchsia boliviana growing happily outside. We should try too.
Fuchsia boliviana
Fuchsia boliviana
Bilbergia nutans, a succulent, which I once grew as a child in pots in my greenhouse.
Bilbergia nutans
Bilbergia nutans
Bilbergia nutans
Bilbergia nutans
Unknown exotic bilbergia/orchid (?) growing happily out of the side of a palm tree.
Unknown exotic bilbergia/orchid
Unknown exotic bilbergia/orchid
Unknown exotic bilbergia/orchid
Unknown exotic bilbergia/orchid
Cyathea medullaris – one of two mature tree ferns of this species here.
Cyathea medullaris
Cyathea medullaris
The scented Rhododendron liliflora which I had never seen. Amazing scent and peeling bark.
Rhododendron liliflora
Rhododendron liliflora
Rhododendron liliflora
Rhododendron liliflora
This rhododendron is apparently a cross between Rhododendron excellans and Rhododendron nuttallii. Looks more of the latter?
a cross between Rhododendron excellans and Rhododendron nuttallii
a cross between Rhododendron excellans and Rhododendron nuttallii
a cross between Rhododendron excellans and Rhododendron nuttallii
a cross between Rhododendron excellans and Rhododendron nuttallii
Exbucklandia populnea in maturity! Amazing! We tried this twice as did Tregothnan who also lost it two times. Tregrehan have it but not at this size. Extraordinary new growth. From the tropics of India, Malaya and Indonesia. Not even faintly frost hardy but doing well here.
Exbucklandia populnea
Exbucklandia populnea
Exbucklandia populnea
Exbucklandia populnea
Exbucklandia populnea
Exbucklandia populnea
Another Cyathea medullaris, the Black Ponga, from New Zealand. Here it has a bit more light and a fatter stem. 15 to 20 years ago we all thought we could grow this spectacular species (and others) outside in Cornwall. We have now found out the hard way that you cannot even with a few degrees of frost.
Another Cyathea medullaris
Another Cyathea medullaris
Another Cyathea medullaris
Another Cyathea medullaris
Another Cyathea medullaris
Another Cyathea medullaris
At the top of Lamorran Gardens Robert Dudley-Cooke has recently planted a rose garden with 175 varieties – mainly old historic ones. His desire is to prove that you can grow a decent rose garden in Cornwall. I forget the name of this one with a variegated flower. All newly planted and about to flower.
one with a variegated flower
one with a variegated flower

2016 – CHW
Off on an oak collection review with Beatrice Chassé of which I will write more when I get her findings and renaming after her two day visit.Along the way I spot two flowers on Rhododendron ‘Crest’ (Hawk Group) just coming out.
Rhododendron ‘Crest’ (Hawk Group)
Rhododendron ‘Crest’ (Hawk Group)
Then Magnolia ‘?’ which I had not seen this year which was more interesting than the Quercus glaber (new name) alongside.
Magnolia unknown
Magnolia unknown
Similarly the new Rhododendron lindleyi clump from Glendoick next to Quercus oxyodon. These have smaller flowers and more pink in the bud than our own seed raised plants from Charles Michaels Nursery.
Rhododendron lindleyi
Rhododendron lindleyi
Rhododendron lindleyi
Rhododendron lindleyi
White campion flowers and the normal pink by the playhouse are a riot.
White campion flowers and the normal pink
White campion flowers and the normal pink
White campion flowers and the normal pink
White campion flowers and the normal pink
2015 – CHW
So an investigation of Magnolia sieboldii and more newly planted forms.Firstly Magnolia sieboldii ‘Ming Pyong Gal’.  Quite a nice large flower but one wonders if this is just ‘a good form’ or if there is a bit of Magnolia sieboldii sinensis in it?

Magnolia sieboldii ‘Ming Pyong Gal’
Magnolia sieboldii ‘Ming Pyong Gal’
Magnolia sieboldii ‘Ming Pyong Gal’
Magnolia sieboldii ‘Ming Pyong Gal’
Magnolia sieboldii 4
Magnolia sieboldii ‘Mishko Renge’
Magnolia sieboldii ‘Mishko Range’
Magnolia sieboldii ‘Mishko Renge’
Magnolia sieboldii ‘Mishko Range’
Magnolia sieboldii ‘Mishko Renge’

Secondly Magnolia sieboldii ‘Mishko Renge’.  The flowers hang down a bit more than you might expect of sieboldii and are on the large side but hardly reddish stamens as sieboldii sinensis should have.

Thirdly one of several sets of Magnolia sieboldii from seed in the garden.  Lots of small flowers which are not all out at once and which hang at right angles to the twig/branch rather than hanging down.  The central cluster of stamens is very clearly a light pink.  A spreading habit, easy to grow, and with abundant pink seedpods if you get there before the squirrels.

Then off to Belvoir Castle for a board meeting and an inspection of our multiple woodland plantings there at dusk and dawn.

Magnolia sieboldii
Magnolia sieboldii
Magnolia sieboldii
Magnolia sieboldii
Magnolia sieboldii 10
Magnolia sieboldii
Magnolia sieboldii 9
Magnolia sieboldii
Magnolia sieboldii 8
Magnolia sieboldii
Magnolia sieboldii 6
Magnolia sieboldii
Magnolia sieboldii 5
Magnolia sieboldii
Magnolia sieboldii 3
Magnolia sieboldii
Magnolia sieboldii 2
Magnolia sieboldii

2001 – FJW
The rain that had begun in mid September and kept going until May 1st. Record rain in many places.

1926 – JCW
Auklandii pure is going back fast and zuelanicum x not come out yet, the soulei x campylocarpum very very pretty. The Davidia not quite open.

1911 – JCW
Recurvas not open as much as in 1909. Daff crossing over. Montana ⅓ open and so Auklandii’s.

1909 – JCW
No recurvas yet, a little of Campylocarpum. Auklandii not quite, ⅓ cushion Iris, frost at night, nearly finished crossing.

1906 – JCW
All recurvas open and late recurvas seedling. Rhodo yunnanense, campylocarpum, thomsonii, falconeri, auklandii, royali, augustinii, dalhousii (nearly) etc, etc. Crimson Hookeri shows colour. Roses opening in beds. Cushion Iris nearly all out, and crossing mostly over.

1901 – JCW
Picked some recurvas, sent two fine Poet flowers to Appleshaw.

One thought on “2nd June

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*