15th November

FJ Williams Profile Picture
FJW 1955-2007
CH Williams Profile Picture
CHW 2015-
JC Williams Profile Picture
JCW 1897-1939
C Williams Profile Picture
CW 1940-1955

2019 – CHW (photos to follow)

A day doing ‘topical tip’ videos with Karol for the Burncoose website.

We looked at this camellia covered in seeds a month ago. I do not think I have ever seen a small bush with so many ripe seeds. On opening though most have no seeds at all in the four chambers and a few had just one. All that effort by the bush with little end result. Very unusual though and quite pretty.

Then on to film collecting rhododendron seed initially on a Rhododendron loderi hybrid. Not all the seed heads have filled out but, those that have, are just starting to turn brown so time to collect them and dry them off indoors where they will split where the ripe seed can be collected in a bag rather than blown in the wind.

On Rhododendron suoilenhense many of the nearly ripe seed pods have already dropped ripe to the ground and only the odd ripe one remains for collecting and drying off indoors. Asia needs to grab what is left quickly if she has not done so already?

Cornus capitata with the flies and wasps enjoying the sweet juicy yellowish pith in the ‘strawberries’ surrounding the individual seeds. It all made a good little video in the sun today. Do not eat them!

2018 – CHW

A new batch of conifers for planting out in Kennel Close. Mainly from Mark Bulk’s nurseries.

Glyptostrobus pensilis ‘Woolly Mammoth’ certainly lives up to its name at this time of the year. A rare swamp cypress from China related to Taxodium.

Glyptostrobus pensilis ‘Woolly Mammoth’
Glyptostrobus pensilis ‘Woolly Mammoth’
Glyptostrobus pensilis ‘Woolly Mammoth’
Glyptostrobus pensilis ‘Woolly Mammoth’
Abies firma, the Momi fir from Japan, has very different new growth needles to its older ones. A big tree which might well go in as a replacement in Donkey Shoe.
Abies firma
Abies firma
Abies firma
Abies firma
Micocachrys tetragona, a rare conifer from Tasmania with a creeping, arching habit.
Micocachrys tetragona
Micocachrys tetragona
Micocachrys tetragona
Micocachrys tetragona
Pinus wallichiana, the Bhutan pine, which I saw growing so beautifully at Tregrehan.
Pinus wallichiana
Pinus wallichiana
Pinus wallichiana
Pinus wallichiana
Chamaecyparis lawsoniana ‘Imbricata Pendula’. I saw this in Ireland at Fota as a huge pendulous tree and decided we needed one too.
Chamaecyparis lawsoniana ‘Imbricata Pendula’
Chamaecyparis lawsoniana ‘Imbricata Pendula’
Chamaecyparis lawsoniana ‘Imbricata Pendula’
Chamaecyparis lawsoniana ‘Imbricata Pendula’

2017 – CHW
Syringa emodii ‘Aureovariegata’ still with no sign of autumn. The prominent dark green centres of its leaves persist only on the leaves which are lower down the shrub.

Syringa emodii ‘Aureovariegata’
Syringa emodii ‘Aureovariegata’
Syringa emodii ‘Aureovariegata’
Syringa emodii ‘Aureovariegata’
Hydrangea quercifolia putting on its true colours – rather late?
Hydrangea quercifolia
Hydrangea quercifolia
Hydrangea quercifolia
Hydrangea quercifolia
Daphniphyllum macropodum with fine red leaf petioles but no sign of flower buds yet on this youngish plant.
Daphniphyllum macropodum
Daphniphyllum macropodum
Daphniphyllum macropodum
Daphniphyllum macropodum
The Camellia oleifera we looked at two weeks ago was, I thought, the largest and oldest which we had. Here is, however, the matriarch below the main ride now nearly over. Could do with a good trim and the team have just started a clean-up in this area.
Camellia oleifera
Camellia oleifera
Camellia oleifera
Camellia oleifera
Camellia oleifera
Camellia oleifera

2016 – CHW
Still plenty of flowers coming on Magnolia grandiflora as usual in November. In a mild winter there are at least some flowers for at least nine months.
Magnolia grandiflora
Magnolia grandiflora
Liquidamber styraciflua ‘Red Star’ is perhaps at its best but far less red than last year. The other varieties have hardly turned colour yet. This was the first to perform last year too.
Liquidamber styraciflua ‘Red Star’
Liquidamber styraciflua ‘Red Star’
Acer palmatum ‘Atropurpureum’ is at its best but the nearby Acer palmatum ‘Osahazuki’ has long since lost its splendid earlier colour.
Acer palmatum ‘Atropurpureum’
Acer palmatum ‘Atropurpureum’
Acer palmatum ‘Atropurpureum’
Acer palmatum ‘Atropurpureum’
Acer palmatum ‘Atropurpureum’
Acer palmatum ‘Atropurpureum’
Nearby a Magnolia stellata variety is still in full green leaf without a hint of autumn as yet. Likewise the Magnolia ‘Caerhays Splendour’ next door. Strange for mid November anywhere else apart from Cornwall I suppose.
Magnolia stellata
Magnolia stellata
Magnolia stellata
Magnolia stellata
We have looked at this clump of Hydrangea ‘Madame Mouillere’ several times since early spring. There are still new flowers opening and full out. While the older ones fade to blue-green with a hint of pink before they finally brown off. Quite an array of colours when you look closely at the same time. A valuable plant!
Hydrangea ‘Madame Mouillere’
Hydrangea ‘Madame Mouillere’
Hydrangea ‘Madame Mouillere’
Hydrangea ‘Madame Mouillere’
Hydrangea ‘Madame Mouillere’
Hydrangea ‘Madame Mouillere’
Hydrangea ‘Madame Mouillere’
Hydrangea ‘Madame Mouillere’
Larix kaempferi glowing yellowish with a hint of orange/red in the hazy sun.
Larix kaempferi
Larix kaempferi

2015 – CHW
There was no hurricane here but much of the autumn colour on the drive was indeed blown away in the largely overnight gales. Rhododendron ‘Cornish Red’ has a few secondary flowers towards the Four in Hand which is not unusual at Christmas but perhaps it is in November.

Rhododendron ‘Cornish Red’
Rhododendron ‘Cornish Red’
Rhododendron ‘Cornish Red’
Rhododendron ‘Cornish Red’
A Prunus subhirtella ‘Autumnalis’ has some white flower although still with leaf. I have never noticed this tree in flower before and it is not that dramatic but, for November, who cares!
Prunus subhirtella ‘Autumnalis’
Prunus subhirtella ‘Autumnalis’
Acer davidii ‘Karmen’ is still mainly green but the odd leaf has good colours. A vigorous grower but the snake bark is best in younger plants. These look better at the Savill Garden where they grow more slowly. This tree was one of several grafted at Lees & Co near Portsmouth by an ex Hillier’s propagator.
Acer davidii ‘Karmen’
Acer davidii ‘Karmen’
Acer davidii ‘Karmen’
Acer davidii ‘Karmen’

2002 – FJW
Nov Pink well out and good flowers on Delavayi – wet November.

1988 – FJW
3 flowers on Nov Pink and 4 flowers on wall Mag delavayi – dry autumn.

1962 – FJW
Still very late.

1958 – FJW
Very late year. Picked one near open bud of November Pink, 2 flowers C oleifera and 1 flower Rho thomsonii. Have picked quite a lot of seed on Japonicas and 2 days ago picked seed of C reticulata. No magnolia seed this year – but 3 seeds of cleistocarpa – 1 of these fertile – and a lot on evergreen oak near Auklandii Garden below Falconeri.

1919 – JCW
Pond frozen for five days. The hardest autumn week we have seen for many years. The hydrangeas remain good.

1913 – JCW
Several coums open. Roses good. C sasanqua at Beech Walk in flower. One double white camellia open. Cynoglossum holds on. Lapagerias nice, several heaths. Clematis cirrhosa very good. Hammamelis nice. Iris stylosa open.

1910 – JCW
C sasanqua nice. E hybrida starting to open. Just a coum or two.

1908 – JCW
Iris stylosa good, C sasanqua fair. P megasoefolia late hardly a flower. Cassia good. Heaths have just begun. No coum yet. C neopolitanum nearly out of flowers, a lot of leaf on yet. Dahlias hardly touched.

1902 – JCW
Iris stylosa open, one flower. C sasanqua on the wall at its best. Primula megasoefolia good.

1897 – JCW
F Wilson shows, also Cyclamineus, Horsfieldii, and Nelsoni major, also M Hume and No 100 of 85.