17th November

FJ Williams Profile Picture
FJW 1955-2007
CH Williams Profile Picture
CHW 2015-
JC Williams Profile Picture
JCW 1897-1939
C Williams Profile Picture
CW 1940-1955

2020 – CHW (photos to follow)

Seagulls and cormorants on the lake reflect the need to shelter from the several severe gales over the weekend.

Hydrangeas which were cut back hard last autumn are now coming into full flower by the Green Gate.

Euonymus europaeus (spindle tree) growing in a hedge and laden with seed capsules. A native hedgerow plant which is not that common here but seldom noticed until it performs like this. Commoner in Hampshire than Cornwall.

A fine show of berries on a group of Ilex aquifolium near Rescassa which the birds have so far left alone. Many of our hollies have few berries this year but this one is an exception.

After an extremely good birthday steak lunch for Serena the three of us set off in the gator to drive around Old Park and Forty Acres in the drizzle. Foolishly I attempted to cross a narrow bridge from the water meadows into Forty Acres wood and we slid unceremoniously into the rather swollen and tide backed up River Luney. Lizzie and the dogs had sensibly got out but Serena and I got a good dunking. Not ideal for her unborn baby and nearly ‘curtains’ at the bottom of the river for me. A bridge I have crossed in the same vehicle many times before but there we are.

Glasses, phone and camera lost so the diary photographs will dry up for a day or two while a new one comes curtesy of our insurers.

The telehandler from the farm soon lifted the vehicle out and surprisingly it started and was driven home where it soon then expired. The engineers suspect it may not be a write off as the engine is in the back and therefore not completely immersed. We will see and a replacement will be needed before we recommence shooting (hopefully) on 3rd December.

The pictures speak for themselves of a narrow and lucky escape! A few bruises, bath and a strong drink! Never a dull moment in lockdown.

2019 – CHW

A trip to look at the early flowering Camellia clump in the Auklandii Garden. These are all Camellia oleifera x Camellia sasanqua hybrids rather than being pure sasanquas. Four of the seven varieties were out.

Camellia “Winter’s Charm” – only just out and the large seed pods seen earlier have dropped.

Camellia “Winter’s Charm”
Camellia “Winter’s Charm”
Camellia “Winter’s Toughie” – a large semi double pink if I have interpreted the planting plan correctly.
Camellia “Winter’s Toughie”
Camellia “Winter’s Toughie”
Camellia “Snow Flurry” plastered in flower and full out but the flowers are easily bruised and can look a bit ‘dirty’!
Camellia “Snow Flurry”
Camellia “Snow Flurry”
Camellia “Snow Flurry”
Camellia “Snow Flurry”
Camellia “Winter’s Interlude” is a good pale anemone form.
Camellia “Winter’s Interlude”
Camellia “Winter’s Interlude”
Camellia “Winter’s Interlude”
Camellia “Winter’s Interlude”

Then on to Tregothnan to admire their national collection of Camellia sasanquas. There are around 100 mainly different varieties in a long avenue beside a main path. The collection was started in 2007 with cuttings from Kyoto in Japan, cuttings from China and plants from Trehane’s nursery and the former Loder gardens. Despite some casualties and deer damage many plants are already 10-12ft tall. 75-80% of the more mature plants were in full flower today and it was really quite a sight in the late afternoon sun.

You may find this list tedious but it is a record of a fantastic and unique collection. Some spellings may be not quite correct and one or two names may be questionable but I do not currently have time to delve more deeply into the reference books.

Burncoose will be able to add quite a few sasanqua x oleifera varieties to the collection (some as listed above) as well as the five different original 1895 sasanqua plants growing on the castle wall.
‘Navahoe’
‘Navahoe’
‘Navahoe’
‘Navahoe’
‘Navahoe’
‘Silver Dollar’
‘Silver Dollar’
‘Silver Dollar’
‘Silver Dollar’
‘Silver Dollar’
‘Rosea Plena’ – very yellow foliage
‘Rosea Plena’
‘Rosea Plena’
‘Rosea Plena’
‘Rosea Plena’
‘Ken Juro’
‘Ken Juro’
‘Ken Juro’
‘Ken Juro’
‘Ken Juro’
‘New Dawn’
‘New Dawn’
‘New Dawn’
‘New Dawn’
‘New Dawn’
‘Paradise Little Lien’
‘Paradise Little Lien’
‘Paradise Little Lien’
‘Paradise Little Lien’
‘Paradise Little Lien’
“Maiden’s Blush”
“Maiden’s Blush”
“Maiden’s Blush”
“Maiden’s Blush”
“Maiden’s Blush”
“Everards’s Delight” – a Loder bred variety
“Everards’s Delight”
“Everards’s Delight”
“Everards’s Delight”
“Everards’s Delight”
‘Slim and Trim’
‘Slim and Trim’
‘Slim and Trim’
‘Slim and Trim’
‘Slim and Trim’
‘Tanya’
‘Tanya’
‘Tanya’
‘Tanya’
‘Tanya’
‘Bonanza’ – the best red we saw
‘Bonanza’
‘Bonanza’
‘Bonanza’
‘Bonanza’
Evelyn with “Winter’s Joy” – I am not convinced this is the right name but an excellent plant – perhaps the most floriferous we saw today
“Winter’s Joy”
“Winter’s Joy”
“Winter’s Joy”
“Winter’s Joy”
‘Rainbow’
‘Rainbow’
‘Rainbow’
‘Rainbow’
‘Rainbow’
‘Paradise Helen’
‘Paradise Helen’
‘Paradise Helen’
‘Paradise Helen’
‘Paradise Helen’
‘Paradise Blush’
‘Paradise Blush’
‘Paradise Blush’
‘Paradise Blush’
‘Paradise Blush’
‘Shishigashira’
‘Shishigashira’
‘Shishigashira’
‘Shishigashira’
‘Shishigashira’
‘Setsugekka’
‘Setsugekka’
‘Setsugekka’
‘Setsugekka’
‘Setsugekka’
‘Trewithen White’ (ex Trewithen)
‘Trewithen White’
‘Trewithen White’
‘Trewithen White’
‘Trewithen White’
‘Trewithen White’
‘Trewithen White’
‘Souvenir de Claude Brivet’ – some branches with white and some with pink flowers
‘Souvenir de Claude Brivet’
‘Souvenir de Claude Brivet’
‘Souvenir de Claude Brivet’
‘Souvenir de Claude Brivet’
x vernalis – another good red but nothing like our x vernalis ‘Dawn’
x vernalis
x vernalis
x vernalis
x vernalis
‘Navajo’ (same as ‘Navahoe’ perhaps?)
‘Navajo’
‘Navajo’
‘Navajo’
‘Navajo’
‘Kanjiro’
‘Kanjiro’
‘Kanjiro’
‘Kanjiro’
‘Kanjiro’
‘Paradise Belinda’
‘Paradise Belinda’
‘Paradise Belinda’
‘Paradise Belinda’
‘Paradise Belinda’
‘Paradise Vanessa’
‘Paradise Vanessa’
‘Paradise Vanessa’
‘Early Pearly’
‘Early Pearly’
‘Early Pearly’
‘Early Pearly’
‘Early Pearly’
‘Early Pearly’
‘Early Pearly’
‘Baronesa de Soujelinho’
‘Baronesa de Soujelinho’
‘Baronesa de Soujelinho’
‘Baronesa de Soujelinho’
‘Baronesa de Soujelinho’
‘Snowflake’
‘Snowflake’
‘Snowflake’
‘Snowflake’
‘Snowflake’
‘Plantation Pink’ – a variety Burncoose used to stock
‘Plantation Pink’
‘Plantation Pink’
‘Plantation Pink’
‘Plantation Pink’
‘Plantation Pink’
‘Plantation Pink’
‘Dazzler’ – excellent
‘Dazzler’
‘Dazzler’
‘Dazzler’
‘Dazzler’
‘Dazzler’
‘Dazzler’
‘Borde Hill Farm’ – another Loder one
‘Borde Hill Farm’
‘Borde Hill Farm’
‘Borde Hill Farm’
‘Borde Hill Farm’
‘Crimson King’
‘Crimson King’
‘Crimson King’
‘Crimson King’
‘Crimson King’
‘Marie Steiner’
‘Marie Steiner’
‘Marie Steiner’
‘Marie Steiner’
‘Marie Steiner’
‘Showa-no-sake’
‘Showa-no-sake’
‘Showa-no-sake’
‘Showa-no-sake’
‘Showa-no-sake’
‘Showa-no-sake’
‘Showa-no-sake’
‘Showa-no-sake’
‘Showa-no-sake’
‘Yoimachi’
‘Yoimachi’
‘Yoimachi’
‘Yoimachi’
‘Yoimachi’
‘Misty Morn’ – a good one!
‘Misty Morn’
‘Misty Morn’
‘Misty Morn’
‘Misty Morn’
‘Misty Morn’
‘Misty Morn’
‘Yuletide’ – the best dark red I think was not out and only had two buds on an 8ft plant, so no image of that for you.

2018 – CHW
Some late autumn colour of note:Carpinus japonica in the sun. This is never going to be that startling but Carpinus species do seem to hold their leaves well into November.
Carpinus japonica
Carpinus japonica
Carpinus japonica
Carpinus japonica
Tilia kuisiana has turned a lovely yellow and is worth its place for autumn colour as well as its late summer flowers.
Tilia kuisiana
Tilia kuisiana
Tilia kuisiana
Tilia kuisiana
Tilia kuisiana
Tilia kuisiana
Liriodendron chinense turning nicely and a standout autumn colour tree today. Probably the best thing in the garden. Liriodendron tulipifera shed three to four weeks ago albeit in a slightly windier spot.
Tilia kuisiana
Tilia kuisiana
Liriodendron chinense
Liriodendron chinense
Liriodendron chinense
Liriodendron chinense
Liriodendron chinense
Liriodendron chinense
Liriodendron chinense
Liriodendron chinense

2017 – CHW
A young self sown Camellia oleifera by Charlie Michaels Nursery. One of several in this area. On the younger new growth the flowers hang down and the centres are not readily visible.
Camellia oleifera
Camellia oleifera
Camellia oleifera
Camellia oleifera
Odd out of season flowers on Azalea ‘Greenway’ as usual.
Azalea ‘Greenway’
Azalea ‘Greenway’
Vaccinum donaldianum with ripening and ripe fruit clusters.
Vaccinum donaldianum
Vaccinum donaldianum
Vaccinum donaldianum
Vaccinum donaldianum
Vaccinum donaldianum
Vaccinum donaldianum
Vaccinum duclouxii also with fairly similar fruit clusters. In fact the two species look much the same in seed although the flowers are a bit different. Are they two forms of the same thing?
Vaccinum duclouxii
Vaccinum duclouxii
Vaccinum duclouxii
Vaccinum duclouxii

2016 – CHW
A good westerly gale has struck down lots of yellowing and green leaves from the Liriodendron tulipifera by the Four in Hand. Quite a display on the tarmac and sides of the drive.
Liriodendron tulipifera
Liriodendron tulipifera
Liriodendron tulipifera
Liriodendron tulipifera
Liriodendron tulipifera
Liriodendron tulipifera
Liriodendron tulipifera
Liriodendron tulipifera
There is something of a yellow hue to what is left on the main tree in the damp sunlight but nothing like the show last year or the year before which Karol photographed so well for the website. Note the comparison.
what is left on the main tree
what is left on the main tree
what is left on the main tree
what is left on the main tree
main tree by Karol
main tree by Karol
main tree by Karol
main tree by Karol

2015 – CHWA fine day and Rhododendron mucronulatum is now full out already. The few flowers seen a week or three ago were, I thought, just a second autumn flush but this would seem to disprove this. Time will tell if it flowers again in January as would be normal but I do not think so. I need to look back again at the younger plants elsewhere in the garden.

Rhododendron mucronulatum
Rhododendron mucronulatum

Erica arborea, the tree heather, is just starting to come out at the Four in Hand. In JCW’s garden diary this is usually noteworthy in January and February. Has our climate really changed that much in 100 years?

Erica arborea
Erica arborea
Erica arborea
Erica arborea

2004 – FJW
Drive camellias well out.

1940 – CW
Still several fuchsias. Camellia oleifera with several flowers in the wood. Picked several nice flowers of Rho R Arboreum x Thomsonii near Tin Garden. Also a bit of Hamamelis. Stewartia sinensis one plant still nice colour and all through as good as anything.

1933 – JCW
C sasanqua has been and is very good indeed. 6 or 8 rhodo’s show flower and Decorum which has been open since Sept! Fuchsia remain very good indeed.