10th January

FJ Williams Profile Picture
FJW 1955-2007
CH Williams Profile Picture
CHW 2015-
JC Williams Profile Picture
JCW 1897-1939
C Williams Profile Picture
CW 1940-1955

2021 – CHW

Cold but sunny.

Emerging Hemerocallis leaves eaten by rabbits or pheasants.

Hemerocallis
Hemerocallis
A couple of decent young Camellia x williamsii ‘George Blandford’ below Rogers Quarry.
Camellia x williamsii ‘George Blandford’
Camellia x williamsii ‘George Blandford’
Camellia x williamsii ‘George Blandford’
Camellia x williamsii ‘George Blandford’
Camellia ‘Alba Simplex’ nicely out but slightly frosted.
Camellia ‘Alba Simplex’
Camellia ‘Alba Simplex’
Camellia ‘Alba Simplex’
Camellia ‘Alba Simplex’
Magnolia ‘Ian’s Red’ is shedding its secondary bud coverings. We lost a large plant at Burncoose to cold for this reason in 2012.
Magnolia ‘Ian’s Red’
Magnolia ‘Ian’s Red’
Camellia ‘Cinnamon Sensation’ just opening.
Camellia ‘Cinnamon Sensation’
Camellia ‘Cinnamon Sensation’
Camellia ‘Cinnamon Sensation’
Camellia ‘Cinnamon Sensation’
Annoyingly deer have been nibbling even the evergreen azaleas in Kennel Close. The bite marks are fresh and obvious.
azaleas
azaleas
Magnolia ‘Plum Pudding’ loaded with buds.
Magnolia ‘Plum Pudding’
Magnolia ‘Plum Pudding’
Rhododendron arboreum ssp. cinnamomeum now out further.
Rhododendron arboreum ssp. cinnamomeum
Rhododendron arboreum ssp. cinnamomeum
The original Stewartia pteropetiolata remains a bold evergreen.
Stewartia pteropetiolata
Stewartia pteropetiolata
Deer damage (horns) to a young oak tree. It will recover with scarring. The roe have got to go in lockdown.
oak tree
oak tree
We saw a few flowers out on Paulownia tomentosa ‘Lilacina’ in November but there are still loads of buds.
Paulownia tomentosa ‘Lilacina’
Paulownia tomentosa ‘Lilacina’
Paulownia tomentosa ‘Lilacina’
Paulownia tomentosa ‘Lilacina’
The first time I have ever found squishy and ripe green fruits to collect on our Sorbus eleonorae. Quite a find and all collected for Asia to try to propagate the seeds.
Sorbus eleonorae
Sorbus eleonorae
Sorbus eleonorae
Sorbus eleonorae
The bark on this Sorbus species is rather special in winter too. Hilliers say the fruits go from green to brown but they are clearly ripe.
Sorbus eleonorae
Sorbus eleonorae
Sorbus eleonorae
Sorbus eleonorae
Lindera tonkinensis is clearly a full evergreen with us in a normal winter.
Lindera tonkinensis
Lindera tonkinensis
Lindera angustifolia now with obvious flower buds and perhaps more semi-evergreen. Very quick growing indeed.
Lindera angustifolia
Lindera angustifolia
Lindera angustifolia
Lindera angustifolia
A large elderly Camellia x williamsii ‘George Blandford’ in the new Rookery clearing.
Camellia x williamsii ‘George Blandford’
Camellia x williamsii ‘George Blandford’
Camellia x williamsii ‘George Blandford’
Camellia x williamsii ‘George Blandford’
Deer damage also to a small evergreen Euonymus moupinensis (now Euonymus echinatus apparently) given to us by Roy Lancaster. Nothing escapes a roe buck looking for a juicy evergreen meal at this time of the year. Worse than rabbit damage!
Euonymus moupinensis
Euonymus moupinensis
Camellia x williamsii ‘Inspiration’ now full out.
Camellia x williamsii ‘Inspiration’
Camellia x williamsii ‘Inspiration’
This old clump of Escallonia iveyi is nearly leafless and needs (again) cutting down to ground level to reshoot. A few bits of broken rhodo and branches to uplift and tidy in this bit of the Auklandii Garden. More branches of the Nothofagus fusca to give more room to Magnolia ‘F J Williams’. Sycamore to get rid of beside the greenhouse and a dead arboreum or two.
Escallonia iveyi
Escallonia iveyi

2020 – CHW
The first snowdrop peeping out. Many more shoots will produce flowers in a couple of days.

snowdrop
snowdrop
A rather paler flowered clump of Rhododendron mucronulatum by the fernery is a fine show. These were bought from Glendoick 12 to 15 years ago.
Rhododendron mucronulatum
Rhododendron mucronulatum
Rhododendron mucronulatum
Rhododendron mucronulatum
Rhododendron mucronulatum
Rhododendron mucronulatum
Rhododendron ‘Winter Intruder’ and Camellia ‘Winton’ go rather nicely together.
Rhododendron ‘Winter Intruder’ and Camellia ‘Winton’
Rhododendron ‘Winter Intruder’ and Camellia ‘Winton’
Rhododendron ‘Winter Intruder’ and Camellia ‘Winton’
Rhododendron ‘Winter Intruder’ and Camellia ‘Winton’
Rhododendron ‘Winter Intruder’ now nearly full out in three separate clumps.
Rhododendron ‘Winter Intruder’
Rhododendron ‘Winter Intruder’
Rhododendron ‘Winter Intruder’
Rhododendron ‘Winter Intruder’
Rhododendron nobleanum and Rhododendron ‘Winter Intruder’ are also a good sight alongside each other on the main drive. No real wind or frost yet to spoil the show.
Rhododendron nobleanum and Rhododendron ‘Winter Intruder’
Rhododendron nobleanum and Rhododendron ‘Winter Intruder’

2019 – CHW
First flowers on Camellia ‘Lipstick’. A wonderful dark anemone form but is it so different from Camellia ‘Anemoniflora’?
Camellia ‘Lipstick’
Camellia ‘Lipstick’
Some split branches on Magnolia delavayi at the top of the garden so we have raised up the crown a bit to make the pathway easier for visitors to manoeuvre.
Magnolia delavayi
Magnolia delavayi
Magnolia delavayi
Magnolia delavayi
Daffodils well on in Kennel Close.
Daffodils
Daffodils
Daffodils
Daffodils

2018 – CHW
We have seen other evergreen azaleas flowering now (‘Greenway’ and ‘Hinomayo’) but here are a couple more. Azalea ‘Kirin’ with its hose in hose flowers.
Azalea ‘Kirin’
Azalea ‘Kirin’
Azalea ‘Malvatica’ with its occasional pink flash on the bud and petals.
Azalea ‘Malvatica’
Azalea ‘Malvatica’
Azalea ‘Malvatica’
Azalea ‘Malvatica’
Camellia ‘Lady Clare’ now full out directly under the Magnolia x veitchii. Still nothing out on the plant by the front door which is unusual.
Camellia ‘Lady Clare’
Camellia ‘Lady Clare’
Camellia ‘Lady Clare’
Camellia ‘Lady Clare’
Rhododendron kiysosumense (related to Rhododendron reticulatum) also has a few pale flowers out and the young growth from last year is still in full leaf on this otherwise deciduous rhododendron. Two other plants nearby are still fully dormant.
Rhododendron kiysosumense
Rhododendron kiysosumense
Rhododendron kiysosumense
Rhododendron kiysosumense
First flower on Camellia x williamsii ‘Muskoka’.
Camellia x williamsii ‘Muskoka’
Camellia x williamsii ‘Muskoka’
Some of the flower buds on Magnolia campbellii ‘Darjeeling’ have lost their outer secondary coating which is not good. Some evidence of rotten flowers. This is an early magnolia to perform and often gets storm damaged (but not by cold as yet).
Magnolia campbellii ‘Darjeeling’
Magnolia campbellii ‘Darjeeling’
Magnolia campbellii ‘Darjeeling’
Magnolia campbellii ‘Darjeeling’

2017 – CHW
I notice an odd small evergreen tree below Kennel Close. Its leaf suggests hornbeam and it turns out to be Carpinus kawakamii. Can there really be evergreen hornbeams? New growth is clearly emerging so perhaps? This one not in Hillier’s but it is in New Trees. Not listed as evergreen but Tom Hudson has had it in full leaf at Tregrehan in December.
Carpinus kawakamii
Carpinus kawakamii
Carpinus kawakamii
Carpinus kawakamii
Carpinus kawakamii
Carpinus kawakamii
Camellia x williamsii ‘Celebration’ (a darker from of Camellia ‘Donation’) is just out at Georges Hut. Nothing on ‘Donation’ yet. This was a chance sport originating from Trewithen.
Camellia x williamsii ‘Celebration’
Camellia x williamsii ‘Celebration’
Rhododendron ‘Peace’ bred at Trewithen and whiter than Rhododendron ‘Alison Johnstone’ has some flowers. It is a near deciduous and rather frail hybrid.
Rhododendron ‘Peace’
Rhododendron ‘Peace’
Rhododendron ‘Peace’
Rhododendron ‘Peace’
The largest Camellia ‘Cornish Snow’ below Donkey Shoe is just coming out. I would say this is late.
Camellia ‘Cornish Snow’
Camellia ‘Cornish Snow’
Camellia ‘Cornish Snow’
Camellia ‘Cornish Snow’

2016 – CHW
Two flowers blown out on Magnolia ‘Dr Merrill’ but they are high up and well formed or is this in fact Magnolia ‘Wadas Memory’ ? Too high up to tell. This is above Crinodendron Hedge next to the Magnolia ‘Lanarth’.

Magnolia ‘Dr Merrill’
Magnolia ‘Dr Merrill’

Camellia reticulata ‘Mary Williams’ (1931 planting) is full out (but just at the top) below Donkey Shoe. Very early!

Camellia reticulata ‘Mary Williams’
Camellia reticulata ‘Mary Williams’

Camellia ‘Cornish Snow’ below it now has most of its flowers blown onto the ground by the wind and not many more buds to come out later by the look of it. Over by late January? Normally this old plant still has a few flowers in April.

Camellia ‘Cornish Snow’
Camellia ‘Cornish Snow’
Although I guess they have probably been showing colour for a few days I only thought today to look for the first snowdrops. More or less on time or only perhaps a week early. At least something is unfazed by this absurdly mild winter. We have always thought snowdrops (like camellias) appear quicker into flower after a cold snap. This year’s performance would seem to disprove this a little? Snowdrops emerge very quickly and can easily be missed for a day or two. One day nothing and three days later there they all are. Many more at Burncoose than here. The large clumps we moved from The Vean before reconstruction started are not showing yet on the bank but they were replanted too deeply from the outset.


1997 – FJW
First definite thaw – no change in the garden since January 1st.
1971 – FJW
Charles picked first snowdrops.
1967 – FJW
10° of frost last night.
1959 – FJW
8° frost. Moors still very badly flooded. Over 2” of rain in 48 hrs at the beginning of the week. Picked first flower on nobilissima by front door. Sutchuenense arboreum hyb above Veitchii are well out.

1898 – JCW
Soleil D’or in flower, several out, Anenome fulgens out.