15th January

FJ Williams Profile Picture
FJW 1955-2007
CH Williams Profile Picture
CHW 2015-
JC Williams Profile Picture
JCW 1897-1939
C Williams Profile Picture
CW 1940-1955

2021 – CHW

Trimming up and uplifting on a Michelia x foggii ‘Allspice’.

Michelia x foggii ‘Allspice’
Michelia x foggii ‘Allspice’
The elderly Camellia maliflora which was storm damaged and cut down 10 to 15 years ago. It is rather chlorotic in parts.
Camellia maliflora
Camellia maliflora
Camellia maliflora
Camellia maliflora
Recent trimming has exposed a fine clump of Phyllostachys nigra with very dark canes.
Phyllostachys nigra
Phyllostachys nigra
Phyllostachys nigra
Phyllostachys nigra
The original and huge (despite being cut down 20 to 25 years ago) Camellia x williamsii ‘John Pickthorn’ just coming out. The buds are long and tubular.
Camellia x williamsii ‘John Pickthorn’
Camellia x williamsii ‘John Pickthorn’
Camellia x williamsii ‘John Pickthorn’
Camellia x williamsii ‘John Pickthorn’
Camellia x williamsii ‘John Pickthorn’
Camellia x williamsii ‘John Pickthorn’
The fruits on what Tom Hudson identified as Malus rockii (he said x rockii but this is not in Hillier’s) are now ripe. New Trees says the fruits are ‘pome red’. There is a hint of reddish brown in them but they are clearly not red!
Malus rockii
Malus rockii
Still some leaves on Crataegus aestivalis (wrongly spelt austivalis on the plant label) which was unexpected.
Crataegus aestivalis
Crataegus aestivalis
Betula utilis var. jacquemontii ‘Inverleith’ with a developing and colourful trunk.
Betula utilis var. jacquemontii ‘Inverleith’
Betula utilis var. jacquemontii ‘Inverleith’
Betula utilis var. jacquemontii ‘Inverleith’
Betula utilis var. jacquemontii ‘Inverleith’
Sorbus japonica still covered in ripe and attractive red fruits with odd spotting.
Sorbus japonica
Sorbus japonica
Sorbus japonica
Sorbus japonica
Sorbus japonica
Sorbus japonica
Sorbus hupehensis likewise.
Sorbus hupehensis
Sorbus hupehensis
Salix fargesii. Last year’s new growth is red, two year old growth has green bark that eventually becomes woody. A quick growing and attractive shrub.
Salix fargesii
Salix fargesii
Salix fargesii
Salix fargesii
Cedrus brevifolia with lots of new growth which has shorter and sparser needles than the more mature growth.
Cedrus brevifolia
Cedrus brevifolia
Cedrus brevifolia
Cedrus brevifolia
Abies pinsapo developing nicely.
Abies pinsapo
Abies pinsapo
Abies pinsapo
Abies pinsapo
Abies pinsapo
Abies pinsapo
Tilia mexicana has a drooping habit and frequently has branches split off in the wind when in full leaf.
Tilia mexicana
Tilia mexicana
Picea morrisonicola – a rare and graceful spruce from Taiwan. Mount Morrison spruce.
Picea morrisonicola
Picea morrisonicola
Picea morrisonicola
Picea morrisonicola
Cedrus libani
Cedrus libani
Cedrus libani
Cedrus libani
Cedrus libani
Cedrus libani
Cedrus libani
The bamboos in Kennel Close have not yet been scorched and partially defoliated in the wind. They look rather impressive clumps today.
Fargesia robusta
Fargesia robusta
Fargesia robusta
Chimonobambusa tumidissinoda – the most vigorous and spreading of these six.
Chimonobambusa tumidissinoda
Chimonobambusa tumidissinoda
Fargesia rufa
Fargesia rufa
Fargesia rufa
Fargesia utilis
Fargesia utilis
Fargesia utilis
Himalayacalamus falconeri
Himalayacalamus falconeri
Himalayacalamus falconeri
The evergreen leaves of Quercus rugosa have some scorching.
Quercus rugosa
Quercus rugosa
I had expected Camellia tsaii to be out earlier but it is just starting with loads of buds. Similar to Camellia cuspidata.
Camellia tsaii
Camellia tsaii
Camellia tsaii
Camellia tsaii
The seedpods we saw in the summer on Fitzroya cupressoides have long since ‘popped’ and shed their seeds.
Fitzroya cupressoides
Fitzroya cupressoides
I have seldom planted Hamamelis here as nobody ever sees them and we had previously found them suspect to Phytophthora ramorum. However I had forgotten this Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Ruby Glow’ tucked away in far too much shade by the Acer griseum. I think next year we ought to try a new planting of some of the best new varieties. An ideal spot would be on the drive where the ash tree fell recently and where we ripped out some poor Camellia reticulata seedlings in the spring.
Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Ruby Glow’
Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Ruby Glow’
Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Ruby Glow’
Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Ruby Glow’
I attempted to see if Magnolia martinii had any flower buds for the spring. Most are new leaf growth buds I fear.
Magnolia martinii
Magnolia martinii
Magnolia martinii
Magnolia martinii
Camellia ‘New Venture’ is now nicely out.
Camellia ‘New Venture’
Camellia ‘New Venture’
New posts installed above the main quarry to keep visitors ‘safe’ if we are ever allowed any.
New posts
New posts

2020 – CHW
The arrival of Storm Brendan gave us two extremely wet days.
Storm Brendan
Storm Brendan
Storm Brendan
Storm Brendan
Signs of deer in the garden.
Signs of deer
Signs of deer
A final bit of path clearing at the top of the garden prior to opening; trimming the laurel here is going to be a priority.
path clearing
path clearing
Jaimie has found a yew tree growing out of the fallen trunk of a tree fern. A yew berry fell here or was deposited into the fibrous trunk, perhaps by a mouse, and has been growing away quite happily for five or six years by the look of it.
yew tree
yew tree

2019 – CHW
Another magnolia is more or less full out. On time, as usual, is Magnolia campbellii var. alba ‘Strybing White’. There is a hint of yellow at the tips of the petals as they first open.
Magnolia campbellii var. alba ‘Strybing White’
Magnolia campbellii var. alba ‘Strybing White’
Magnolia campbellii var. alba ‘Strybing White’
Magnolia campbellii var. alba ‘Strybing White’

2018 – CHW
The new shop is finally finished and the team look pleased (Jaimie, Lucy, Lucinda, Tim and Aaron). The nice furniture from the old shop in the garage has been moved across and is in place. It all has a light modern feel and will oblige visitors to go through it on their way out of the gardens. Easier to manage with less staff especially on wet days. Not quite what we originally planned a few years ago but a great leap forward none the less. All disabled/wheelchair friendly we hope with a staff sink for health and safety handwashing – why is this obligatory I wonder?
new shop
new shop
new shop
new shop
new shop
new shop
new shop
new shop
new shop
new shop

2017 – CHW
The scent from the Daphne bholua alba is overpowering today above the greenhouse. The plant is now full out and breathtaking!
Daphne bholua alba
Daphne bholua alba
Daphne bholua alba
Daphne bholua alba
Daphne bholua alba
Daphne bholua alba
Daphne bholua alba
Daphne bholua alba
In the small greenhouse a couple of new plants of Camellia ‘Quintessential’ are full out. This is Camellia japonica crossed with Camellia lutchuensis and is supposed to be highly perfumed and semi-double. I cannot observe either trait but perhaps the flowers are too full out to still be scented? The plants came from a French nursery so perhaps a Brexit retaliation? I must ask Asia what she thinks.
Camellia ‘Quintessential’
Camellia ‘Quintessential’
Camellia ‘Quintessential’
Camellia ‘Quintessential’
Lots of new magnolias for planting out in a month or so. Quite a big job again this year.
Lots of new magnolias
Lots of new magnolias
Lots of new magnolias
Lots of new magnolias

2016 – CHW
Camellia ‘Noblissima’ by the front door is now full out and relatively undamaged by the wind and rain. The plant is 120 years old and very slow growing.

Camellia ‘Noblissima’
Camellia ‘Noblissima’
Camellia ‘Noblissima’
Camellia ‘Noblissima’

Its similarly elderly neighbour Camellia ‘Lady Clare’ has only one bud showing colour. In the main garden in shelter it is full out as we have seen previously.

Camellia ‘Lady Clare’
Camellia ‘Lady Clare’

1966 – FJW
6° frost. No snowdrops. Big clearing above Veitchii.

1958 – FJW
Picked 4 buds of Mary Williams – Camellias very forward – starting cutting back centre block of big bed of Hydrangeas above drive. Snowdrops good.

1928 – JCW
Just as in 1926. Erica hybrida is ¼ open, nobleanums nice, some snowdrops, the white ribes should be out this coming week. Hamamelis remain very good.

1926 – JCW
Snow and frost but not very bad yet, R mucronulatum is only now open as against Christmas in most years, excepting Hamamelis there is not much else.

1923 – JCW
Much later than 1916 or 19 owing to a cold wet summer as I see it, no real cold has come yet.

1919 – JCW
As near as may be to 1916 though I am not sure of the cherry.

1916 – JCW
The following Rhodo’s are open and are of about the relative value in which I place them R mucronulatum, R praecox, R nobleanum, R barbatum, R moupinense, Thomsonii x a blood red, R oleifolium, R lutescens, R chrysanthum and a bit of Pearl. The snowdrops, coums and aconites are fair, no daffodils yet. Wilsons cherry opens 1st bloom and the white Ribes.

1907 – JCW
Snowdrops just showing, aconite hardly showing, C coums ⅔ open, no sign of R Praecox, no daffs show colour,. R nobleanum is good.

1906 – JCW
Snowdrops well out, coum at their best, about six trumpet seedlings open, Ericas very good, it has been very mild, several Camellias open. Rho Praecox well out.

1897 – JCW
Snowdrops in full flower, a good few yellow crocus, 2 sorts Polyanthus Daf out and half the minimus, fair lot of Primroses.