4th August

FJ Williams Profile Picture
FJW 1955-2007
CH Williams Profile Picture
CHW 2015-
JC Williams Profile Picture
JCW 1897-1939
C Williams Profile Picture
CW 1940-1955

2017 – CHW

MORE from Ventnor.

Acacia pravissima as a 15-18ft tree with many seed pods.

Acacia pravissima
Acacia pravissima
Acacia pravissima
Acacia pravissima
Acacia pravissima
Acacia pravissima
Eucalyptus amygdalina – with white flowers scented clearly of mint. A huge mature tree.
Eucalyptus amygdalina
Eucalyptus amygdalina
Eucalyptus amygdalina
Eucalyptus amygdalina
Eucalyptus amygdalina
Eucalyptus amygdalina
Diospyros lotus, the Date Plum, with inedible fruit forming on a tree 30ftx20ft. It looks an evergreen but is not.
Diospyros lotus
Diospyros lotus
Diospyros lotus
Diospyros lotus
Diospyros lotus
Diospyros lotus
Diospyros lotus
Diospyros lotus
Tetrapanax papyrifera ‘Rex’. The old trunks have died and vigorous new suckers have appeared in the border.
Tetrapanax papyrifera ‘Rex’
Tetrapanax papyrifera ‘Rex’
Tetrapanax papyrifera ‘Rex’
Tetrapanax papyrifera ‘Rex’
I was right! It is an aristolochia called Aristolochia californica.
Aristolochia californica
Aristolochia californica
A nice spreading clump of Romneya coulteri.
Romneya coulteri
Romneya coulteri
Romneya coulteri
Romneya coulteri
Romneya coulteri
Romneya coulteri
Echium seedlings by the thousand!
Echium seedlings
Echium seedlings
Echium seedlings
Echium seedlings
Citrus orange growing outside. Note the suckers from below the graft which need removing and the careful pruning which has encouraged dense new growth.
Citrus orange
Citrus orange
Citrus orange
Citrus orange
Citrus orange
Citrus orange
Blue seed panicles on Berberis valdiviana. Very attractive!
Berberis valdiviana
Berberis valdiviana
Berberis valdiviana
Berberis valdiviana
Berberis valdiviana
Berberis valdiviana
Isoplexis canariensis with a late flower and bulging seed heads.
Isoplexis canariensis
Isoplexis canariensis
Isoplexis canariensis
Isoplexis canariensis
Isoplexis canariensis
Isoplexis canariensis
A wall covered with Trachelospermum jasminoides.
Trachelospermum jasminoides
Trachelospermum jasminoides
Trachelospermum jasminoides
Trachelospermum jasminoides
Pseudopanax ferox at 12ft with its totally different secondary leaves.
Pseudopanax ferox
Pseudopanax ferox

2016 – CHW
On the way early to the mainland but just time to photograph a fine Magnolia grandiflora ‘Goliath’ which has narrower and more pointed leaves than most other forms of M grandiflora. This specimen grows in the garden of a lady who collects succulents and echeveria which I inspected last night. Not my idea of nice plants but each to his own!
Magnolia grandiflora ‘Goliath’
Magnolia grandiflora ‘Goliath’
Magnolia grandiflora ‘Goliath’
Magnolia grandiflora ‘Goliath’
2015 – CHW
The grasscutting in the garden is now up to Georges Hut and a good half way through. Lots of roe deer tracks, rubbing and nibbling and today I see a roe buck with reasonable horns grazing happily in the middle of Kennel Close who ignores my car not once but twice at 40 yards.Eucryphia nymansensis ‘Nymansay’ coming out both outside the front gate and in New Planting. The latter was a record sized multi-stemmed tree until felled in the 1990 hurricane. We chopped it back to six feet and rebedded the roots and it is now back up to 15 feet but still looks a bit starved in comparison to the one in its prime on the drive at Burncoose.
Eucryphia nymansensis ‘Nymansay’
Eucryphia nymansensis ‘Nymansay’
Eucryphia nymansensis ‘Nymansay’
Eucryphia nymansensis ‘Nymansay’
Eucryphia nymansensis ‘Nymansay’
Eucryphia nymansensis ‘Nymansay’
The best show in the garden today are five plants of Hydrangea paniculata grandiflora on the bank at Hovel Cart Road. Huge and really robust in comparison to the forms shown a few days ago. Each plant is a good 10 feet tall and nearly as wide.
Hydrangea paniculata grandiflora
Hydrangea paniculata grandiflora
Hydrangea paniculata grandiflora
Hydrangea paniculata grandiflora
The first hoheria to come out is Hoheria glabrata hidden away by the castanopsis. The flower clusters resemble the shape of a (pendant) kalmia in bud. The tree (12-15ft) at Burncoose is ancient but never seems quite to die. This clump of three were planted in 1991.
Hoheria glabrata
Hoheria glabrata
Hoheria glabrata
Hoheria glabrata
Hoheria glabrata
Hoheria glabrata
Nearby is Eucryphia lucida also only just showing colour with huge flowers that attract bees. Again a clump of three in the post hurricane planting but rather a poor place to see it properly.
Eucryphia lucida
Eucryphia lucida
Eucryphia lucida
Eucryphia lucida
Podocarpus ‘Blue Gem’ came as a gift from David Lees of Lees & Co where he had grown it for many years in his seaside garden at Lymington. Clearly tender and probably South African it has truly gorgeous blue new growth and has made a nice shrub here. We have stocked it before in the nursery and must now propagate it again.

1997 – FJW
Very heavy rain for 3 days now – have not had such a wet spell at this time for years. One flower on lapageria.

1995 – FJW
Madeleine Williams arrived into the world – very hot and dry.

1964 – FJW
Harvest started. Auriculatums fair (Polar Bears excellent) – Eucryphia glutinosa good – Nymansensis will take another week.

1916 – JCW
The Romneya has 400 to 500 flowers open. There is nothing much else except Solanum.

1914 – JCW
The European war began August 2nd 44 years to a day from the last great war. Very few things open except R auriculatum which I am crossing with R ungernii from Treghan, a clean white form.

1897 – JCW
The first red lapageria open and I left for Scotland.

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