15th July

FJ Williams Profile Picture
FJW 1955-2007
CH Williams Profile Picture
CHW 2015-
JC Williams Profile Picture
JCW 1897-1939
C Williams Profile Picture
CW 1940-1955

2017 – CHW

Another clump of Rhododendron ‘Harrow Hybrids’ on Hovel Cart Road is nearly over with petals strewn around on the ground. Slightly darker red than the one on the drive when first out but fading pinker.

Rhododendron ‘Harrow Hybrids’
Rhododendron ‘Harrow Hybrids’
Rhododendron ‘Harrow Hybrids’
Rhododendron ‘Harrow Hybrids’
Rhododendron ‘Harrow Hybrids’
Rhododendron ‘Harrow Hybrids’
Rhododendron ‘Harrow Hybrids’
Rhododendron ‘Harrow Hybrids’
The second Cornus hongkongensis is rather more floriferous, although in far more shade, than the one seen last week.
Cornus hongkongensis
Cornus hongkongensis
We cut this enormous wild collected Osmanthus yunnanensis back last year. At least two of the trunks are starting to shoot quite well. The tree was over mature, very elderly and in serious need of rejuvenation but a big risk with a historic tree which came here in 1923.
Osmanthus yunnanensis
Osmanthus yunnanensis
Osmanthus yunnanensis
Osmanthus yunnanensis
Eucryphia x nymansensis ‘Nymansay’ will be out in a week or so.
Eucryphia x nymansensis ‘Nymansay’
Eucryphia x nymansensis ‘Nymansay’
I never cease to be surprised at how many odd Rhododendron ‘Polar Bear’ we have dotted about. You pass them twice a week but never think or look twice until July. There are three in the Rirei Opening which I had not taken in before. This one full out, one over and one still in bud. Individual Polar Bears can emerge any time between late June and September. You smell them first!
Rhododendron ‘Polar Bear’
Rhododendron ‘Polar Bear’
Another pure white Rhododendron viscosum growing in full shade by Tin Garden and much later into flower than the several others we have seen earlier.
Rhododendron viscosum
Rhododendron viscosum
Rhododendron viscosum
Rhododendron viscosum
A few odd seeds show up from last October’s flowers on Schima khasiana. A bit like small figs. The seasons are a bit the wrong way around with this plant!
Schima khasiana
Schima khasiana
Schima khasiana
Schima khasiana
This 10 year old Rehderodendron macrocarpum tree is laden with ripening pinkish fruits outside the front gate. One or two appear to have split in the recent heat. A hell of a crop to collect in a month or so from such a young tree.
Rehderodendron macrocarpum
Rehderodendron macrocarpum
Rehderodendron macrocarpum
Rehderodendron macrocarpum
Rehderodendron macrocarpum
Rehderodendron macrocarpum

2016 – CHW
Nick Macer from Pan-Global Plants arrives for a tour. We had not met but Jaimie had showed him around before. He trained at Wakehurst.Mahonia oiwakensis has a delicate reddish bronze hue to its new growth and Nick is a mahonia lover. Sadly I am not!
Mahonia oiwakensis
Mahonia oiwakensis
Mahonia oiwakensis
Mahonia oiwakensis
Aralia vietnamensis has gigantic new leaves and looks too tender for us but I may be wrong. From a distance I had assumed another odd shefflera species but I was well wrong.
Aralia vietnamensis
Aralia vietnamensis
Aralia vietnamensis
Aralia vietnamensis
Aralia vietnamensis
Aralia vietnamensis
Kalopanax septemlobus is about to flower in profusion. We seldom remember to go and look at this time of the year.
Kalopanax septemlobus
Kalopanax septemlobus
Ehretia dicksonii is also in flower and the smell is disgusting. Jaimie says ‘cat’s piss’ but we have never had a cat!
Ehretia dicksonii
Ehretia dicksonii
Ehretia dicksonii
Ehretia dicksonii
Seed forming in Symplocos dryophylla which will eventually turn blue-black and Asia needs to try growing it as well as taking cuttings shortly.
Symplocos dryophylla
Symplocos dryophylla
Styrax serrulatus is now full out and much later than all other species. No scent but attractive bark and a drooping habit. The best thing in the garden today I think.
Styrax serrulatus
Styrax serrulatus
Styrax serrulatus
Styrax serrulatus
Here is a new plant for the 2017 Burncoose catalogue already doing well. Fatsia polycarpa has much narrower leaf divides than Fatsia japonica and has made a well-shaped shrub here. I have failed to find it in the nursery to photograph so now the job is done. It is Taiwanese in origin but apparently hardy to minus 10°. We will see but it must be eight to ten years old already.
Fatsia polycarpa
Fatsia polycarpa
Fatsia polycarpa
Fatsia polycarpa
This is labelled Magnolia aff floribunda var tonkinense and is a Crug wild collected plant flowering for the first time. Despite its name it is clearly a manglietia and no relation (really) to our or the Tregrehan Michelia floribunda. We have just missed the first flower and there are no more buds so cannot call the real colour on opening. Not that exciting however!
Magnolia aff floribunda var tonkinense
Magnolia aff floribunda var tonkinense
The Rhododendron sinonuttallii by the main quarry is just out a month later than the other Glendoick sourced clump above the greenhouse. This is much more like the one which grew for 20 years in the Burncoose conservatory and stank us all out. Attractive reddish-purple new growth. This plant looks tender but the others less so.
Rhododendron sinonuttallii
Rhododendron sinonuttallii
Rhododendron sinonuttallii
Rhododendron sinonuttallii

2015 – CHW

The oldest plants of Hydrangea sargentiana remain alive, just, in the Auklandii Garden but have long since died out near Rookery Gate and Donkey Shoe. They live longer in shade. This group was planted in 2008 and already has plenty of flower although smaller and more compact than I remember the originals.  Next to it is Viburnum betulifolium now full out three or more weeks after I photographed the bud. This too was planted in 2008. The best clump at Trewithen is grown up a wooden trellis which displays its berries to best effect in the winter.

Amazing how plants have moved on in a fortnight. Good to be back! The wonderful Roy Lancaster introduced climbing rose species is nearly over on the front arch. I have no idea of a name? The hips are even more impressive than the flowers.

On the top wall Dierama pulcherrimum in full flower. Some flowers are very dark and some have unusual and different striping. The dark flowers are Dierama pulcherrimum ‘Blackbird’ but I have no idea about the striped ones. A big surprise and must remember to collect seed.
Dierama pulcherrimum
Dierama pulcherrimum
Dierama pulcherrimum
Dierama pulcherrimum
Dierama pulcherrimum
Dierama pulcherrimum
Dierama pulcherrimum ‘Blackbird’
Dierama pulcherrimum ‘Blackbird’

2002 – FJW
First hot day of the summer.

1980 – FJW
Wet summer. Flowers on 3 Camellias – Midsummer’s Day, Konron Jura and one in ‘White Piece’.

1919 – JCW
Plagianthus lyalii is just opening, R brunonis is good. Escallonia pteroclaydon is fair. L giganteums are going over. The Romneya is coming on.

1918 – JCW
Plagianthus lyalii is very good indeed. There is very little else, and a fine lot of rain after a very dry bout.

1915 – JCW
Two years old stuff all out of their pans. Plagianthus lyalii did half the D and L’s. Yesterday, not really open. Buddleias have hardly opened. R r remains poor, too damp. Mitraria fair. Very little in the hard wood way about.

1898 – JCW
No real start in [bamboo] Nitida yet. Many seedlings planted in the new ground, say one third. Everlasting peas open. Put in from 207 to 218, new things of E’s.

1897 – JCW
Nitida has lately started to grow properly. All Engelhart’s bulbs are planted. I speciosum at its best.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*