30th July

FJ Williams Profile Picture
FJW 1955-2007
CH Williams Profile Picture
CHW 2015-
JC Williams Profile Picture
JCW 1897-1939
C Williams Profile Picture
CW 1940-1955

2017 – CHW

Jaimie has sent me pictures of the new machine’s performance in cutting Old Park. It all looks very tidy and well ahead of our normal schedule which is great. The gunnera bed is at its zenith too.

Old Park
Old Park
Old Park
Old Park
Old Park
Old Park
Old Park
Old Park
A huge wasps’ nest in a bank dug out by a badger who was clearly repulsed in the attempt!
wasps’ nest
wasps’ nest
wasps’ nest
wasps’ nest

2016 – CHW
A shambolic 1960s style farm shop right beside a tourist trap called ‘Oasis’ selling tourist ‘tat’. The shop is run by an elderly couple with no till and a lack of hygiene regulations which would drive the EU and supermarkets absolutely mad. Self-butchered boar and delicious scotch eggs, crab in punnets with a ‘sell by’ label handwritten and stuck on as you buy. An absolutely perfect food hut pictured here with free range livestock. This is what smallholder farming used to be!
A shambolic 1960s style farm shop
A shambolic 1960s style farm shop
A shambolic 1960s style farm shop
A shambolic 1960s style farm shop

A few more novelties to consider as we buy a few plants for the Backstay garden.Lobelia ‘Fan Salmon’ is a pleasant pink with dark brown leaves like the popular Lobelia ‘Queen Victoria’.

Lobelia ‘Fan Salmon’
Lobelia ‘Fan Salmon’
Lobelia ‘Fan Salmon’
Lobelia ‘Fan Salmon’
Rudbeckia ‘Tiger Eye Gold’ is a lowish growing good yellow but not quite Rudbeckia ‘Goldsturm’ so probably not worth stocking. On offer at £4.95!
Rudbeckia ‘Tiger Eye Gold’
Rudbeckia ‘Tiger Eye Gold’
Rudbeckia ‘Tiger Eye Gold’
Rudbeckia ‘Tiger Eye Gold’
Cestrum elegans is a Mexican species which we do not stock. Pinkish-purple or pinkish-red flowers and not that different to Cestrum ‘Newellii’ which has bright crimson flowers and is probably a hybrid of Cestrum elegans. The foliage is different though.
Cestrum elegans
Cestrum elegans
Cestrum elegans
Cestrum elegans
Cestrum elegans
Cestrum elegans
Rudbeckia ‘Prairie Glow’ is probably sufficiently different and bicolor to make it a useful addition to the catalogue if we can locate a grower.
Rudbeckia ‘Prairie Glow’
Rudbeckia ‘Prairie Glow’
Rudbeckia ‘Prairie Glow’
Rudbeckia ‘Prairie Glow’
A new one to me entirely was Lysimachia ‘Clethroides’ although you can see how it justifies its name. I do not remember ever seeing a white lysimachia and we even bought one (£8.00).
Lysimachia ‘Clethroides’
Lysimachia ‘Clethroides’
Lysimachia ‘Clethroides’
Lysimachia ‘Clethroides’

Now on to the happy task of selecting the Caerhays order of rare plants from Crug Farm for delivery in February 2017.

2015 – CHW

Mark Bulk’s (Boskoop, Holland) availability list (for once with prices) arrives to peruse. Quite a few odd, rare and new things to purchase for the new 2016 Burncoose catalogue based on new ‘stuff’ growing well here already. Strangely JCW did often use the word ‘stuff’ to describe his plants. A rare aberration from the then protocol.

Chordospartium stevensonii (coastal plant seen at Ventnor)Carriera calycina (original plant here from Penrice Castle)

Cornus kousa ‘Xanthocarpa’ (yellow fruits – very rare)

Deutzia pulchra (wild collected and given to us originally by Roy Lancaster)

Forsythia mandschurica (no idea but dwarf?)

Hydrangea serratifolia (as at Tregothnan – climber)

Polyspora axillaris (see early February for pictures)

Torreya nuncifera (endangered in the wild)

I end up ordering lots for Caerhays and Burncoose gardens and will leave Clare to do the serious catalogue stuff. Quite fun spending a little (£5,000) of the Burncoose spring profits! Easy to get carried away by my personal preferences and then a bollocking no doubt from Andrew, the nursery manager, for increasing our stock too much.Then on to photograph oaks planted in Penvergate (Forty Acres Wood) and Giddle Orchard (Old Park Wood) since 1997. Time is so limited apart from July and August to actually look at what has been as prolific and extensive a planting programme as the garden as ever seen since 1910 to 1930. Many failures and losses. The further you go from Castle Wood the less maintenance and care has been undertaken and the greater the losses. Still we did find a few successes for the next 50 plus years to enjoy!

In March 1997 Quercus variabilis was planted in Giddle Orchard. Although the leaves do not quite match the picture in the Chevithorne oak book the trunk certainly does. A 15 to 20ft tree in 18 years and doing well. We clearly now have two or three of these dotted about.
Quercus variabilis
Quercus variabilis
Quercus variabilis
Quercus variabilis
Of the other six Mexican oaks planted in Giddle Orchard in March 1999 I can find no obvious trace. Uxoris, lancefolia, acutifolia and candicans. We just also lost a Quercus candicans above the veitchiis but this had blown over. Unless I am being dim a total wipeout but trees did come down here and plenty of space to try again.
Moving on to Penvergate we planted Quercus castaneifolia and Quercus coccifera. The former has done well although it is a bit like Quercus x pseudoturneri. Planted in 1998 and a good 20 feet today.
Quercus castaneifolia
Quercus castaneifolia
Quercus castaneifolia
Quercus castaneifolia
Quercus castaneifolia
Quercus castaneifolia
Quercus coccifera, the Kermes Oak, is really a bushy shrub and has done very well in Penvergate just below the pheasant pen at the far end. Probably badly sited.
Quercus coccifera
Quercus coccifera
Quercus coccifera
Quercus coccifera
Of the four other oaks planted in Penvergate in 2000 only two remain. A very poor and stunted Quercus acutifolia which is only 4ft tall and has much salt spray dieback. Secondly, what I think is Quercus castanena x sapadifolia growing reasonably beside Acer sterculiaceum which is doing well. Of Quercus affinis and Quercus rugosa there is no sign. Major casualties because of minimal care and maintenance on the periphery of the garden.
One cannot help admiring Betual albosinensis ‘Bowling Green’ from Werrington via Wilson in 1901. Amazing bark and just as I remember it. Planted 15 years ago. Nice to see several crabiodendron doing well here too.
Betual albosinensis ‘Bowling Green’
Betual albosinensis ‘Bowling Green’
Betual albosinensis ‘Bowling Green’
Betual albosinensis ‘Bowling Green’
Betual albosinensis ‘Bowling Green’
Betual albosinensis ‘Bowling Green’
Betual albosinensis ‘Bowling Green’
Betual albosinensis ‘Bowling Green’
On the way back down the drive we spot Quercus x bushii with its extraordinary leaf form. Planted in 1997/8. A hybrid of Quercus marylandica and Quercus velutina. Our Quercus marylandica above Higher Quarry Nursery now looks sickly with major dieback.
Quercus x bushii
Quercus x bushii
Quercus x bushii
Quercus x bushii
Quercus x bushii
Quercus x bushii

1989 – FJW
A little rain is falling. We need a great deal – last proper rain June 3rd.

1965 – FJW
First Young Farmers Rally. Lost 1 pair of trousers and a parrot. A wet year – hay difficult – new growth on plants very marked.

1929 – JCW
Hybrids of Ungernii, Decorum and Discolor x Auriculatum are very good, Rosa Brunonis and American Pillar are very and so is the Romneya. One or two Eriogynum have flowers now. Mag delavayi a lot of flowers.

1917 – JCW
Buddleias are good now there is very little else. The Gros au Felicity rose has been very good since May, but wants food.

1916 – JCW
Much as above. Plagianthus begins to go yellow in the leaf, flowers good yet.

1910 – JCW
The buddleias are just starting. Mitraria are good. Ferns by the mitrarias good. Honeysuckles good, not much else, an odd lapageria and so cyclamen.

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