15th June

FJ Williams Profile Picture
FJW 1955-2007
CH Williams Profile Picture
CHW 2015-
JC Williams Profile Picture
JCW 1897-1939
C Williams Profile Picture
CW 1940-1955

2020 – CHW

Good flowers on Magnolia grandiflora ‘Main Street’.

Magnolia grandiflora ‘Main Street’
Magnolia grandiflora ‘Main Street’
Magnolia grandiflora ‘Main Street’
Magnolia grandiflora ‘Main Street’
Pseudotaxus chienii is doing well on Sinogrande Walk. The white berry yew has yet to produce any fruits but is now about 4ft tall. In fact we have no idea yet if it is a female tree. Burncoose now stocks this dwarfish slow growing variety. Quite a difference between the arrangements of the older leaves and the new growth. I had forgotten that we had this established here in full sun; a hot and dry location.
Pseudotaxus chienii
Pseudotaxus chienii
Pseudotaxus chienii
Pseudotaxus chienii
Pseudotaxus chienii
Pseudotaxus chienii
Pseudotaxus chienii
Pseudotaxus chienii
Phellodendron japonicum is supposed to have corky bark but not yet. I had not spotted this new species to us before but it is doing well on Burns Bank.
Phellodendron japonicum
Phellodendron japonicum
Phellodendron japonicum
Phellodendron japonicum
Phellodendron japonicum
Phellodendron japonicum
Phellodendron japonicum
Phellodendron japonicum
I was confused by Amelanchier bartramiana and Amelanchier florida earlier this year hoping that their fruits might turn out to be different as I could see little difference in their flowers. A. florida has slightly more pinkish red fruits on more drooping stems as far as I can see today but the difference is, so far, slight.
Amelanchier bartramiana
Amelanchier bartramiana
Two out of three casualties in our deliberately closely planted trio of Betula albosinensis ‘China Rose’ (in the Isla Rose planting) due to the recent drought and last summer’s.
Betula albosinensis ‘China Rose’
Betula albosinensis ‘China Rose’
Pterocarya tonkinensis has moved in the wind and needs re-staking. Its bark is not that different (as a young tree) to the Phellodendron above.
Pterocarya tonkinensis
Pterocarya tonkinensis
Pterocarya tonkinensis
Pterocarya tonkinensis
First flowers coming on Cornus drummondii ‘Sunshiny Drops’ from America (where else a name like this!). It is said to be stunning as are the fruits so we will see. Gift from Jan-Willem.
Cornus drummondii ‘Sunshiny Drops’
Cornus drummondii ‘Sunshiny Drops’
Cornus drummondii ‘Sunshiny Drops’
Cornus drummondii ‘Sunshiny Drops’
Rhododendron megacalyx is pink in bud opening white and you can clearly see the huge calyxes here.
Rhododendron megacalyx
Rhododendron megacalyx
Rhododendron megacalyx
Rhododendron megacalyx
Rhododendron megacalyx
Rhododendron megacalyx
Rhododendron megacalyx
Rhododendron megacalyx

2019 – CHW
The St Michaels Caerhays flower festival themed as “Poldark’s Cornwall” has involved and brought together many people in the community who might otherwise not be churchgoers. A wonderful theme, superb standard and a delight to enjoy over three days culminating in the Caerhays charity fete tomorrow. The explanation of each arrangement was written by Gillian Fraser and is attached for anyone wanting to read more.

Matt Semmens had remade the ironwork on the bell tower door for the occasion.
bell tower door
bell tower door
bell tower door
bell tower door
‘Mining’ with the copper ingot. Clever!
‘Mining’
‘Mining’
‘Mining’
‘Mining’
“Ursula’s Baptism”. The font was decorated using an excellent colour combination of leptospermum, Thalictrum, pale pink Alstroemeria and Euonymus japonicus ‘Silver Queen’.
“Ursula’s Baptism”
“Ursula’s Baptism”
“Ursula’s Baptism”
“Ursula’s Baptism”
‘Tall Ships’ – superb.
St Michaels Caerhays flower festival
St Michaels Caerhays flower festival
Above the collection box.
Above the collection box
Above the collection box
‘Game keeping’ with the figures showing more than a passing resemblance to John & Caroline George. Slightly unchurchlike but splendid!
‘Game keeping’
‘Game keeping’
‘Game keeping’
‘Game keeping’
‘Game keeping’
‘Game keeping’
‘Fishing’ – modern and a glorious flower combination.
Fishing
Fishing
Fishing
Fishing
‘Gaming’ – notes not real!
Gaming
Gaming
‘Smuggling’ in the alcove – very clever.
‘Smuggling’
‘Smuggling’
The lectern also with beautiful flower combinations involving pinks, Hebe, callistemon and leptospermum in ‘The Apothecary’.
St Michaels Caerhays flower festival
St Michaels Caerhays flower festival
‘The Apothecary’
‘The Apothecary’
‘The Apothecary’
‘The Apothecary’
Beside the altar a magnificent ‘Transport’ with a cart and unusual but effective combinations of Hosta, laurel, ferns, chrysanthemum and Alstroemeria.
Beside the alter
Beside the alter
‘Smithy’
St Michaels Caerhays flower festival
St Michaels Caerhays flower festival
“Warleggan’s Bank” with coins and yellow lilies.
“Warleggan’s Bank”
“Warleggan’s Bank”
“Warleggan’s Bank”
“Warleggan’s Bank”
‘Grand Ball’ – Shasta daisies and Veronicastrum I think in the centre.
‘Grand Ball’
‘Grand Ball’
‘Grand Ball’
‘Grand Ball’
“Demelza’s Kitchen”
Demelza’s Kitchen
Demelza’s Kitchen
‘Country Inn’ by the lectern with wonderful use of ‘curly’ sycamore seeds.
Country Inn
Country Inn
Country Inn
Country Inn
The Burncoose sponsorship board.
Burncoose sponsorship board
Burncoose sponsorship board
‘Bodmin Market’ at the entrance.
‘Bodmin Market’
‘Bodmin Market’
‘Bodmin Market’
‘Bodmin Market’
The entrance decorated.
entrance
entrance
Dad and Mum’s graves awaiting the return of the headstone and granite surround but with sweet william and a wreath.
Dad and Mum’s graves
Dad and Mum’s graves
Quite a view over the River Luney valley for them both to enjoy!
view over the River Luney
view over the River Luney

2018 – CHW
Karpinus kawakamii restored to life and new growth after The Beast had, we thought, rendered it dead. The light pruning from six weeks ago has helped.

Karpinus kawakamii
Karpinus kawakamii
Karpinus kawakamii
Karpinus kawakamii
Leptospermum lonigerum full out and a blaze of white.
Leptospermum lonigerum
Leptospermum lonigerum
Leptospermum lonigerum
Leptospermum lonigerum
This I think might just be the true Magnolia ‘Yuchelia’. It is labelled as such and only just out now. I will be forwarding these pictures to my friend who pointed out my longstanding error and the impossibility of our original plant being true to name based on its parentage.
Magnolia ‘Yuchelia’
Magnolia ‘Yuchelia’
Magnolia ‘Yuchelia’
Magnolia ‘Yuchelia’
Magnolia ‘Yuchelia’
Magnolia ‘Yuchelia’

2017 – CHW
Garden visitors keep muttering that there is ‘nothing to see’. Although an early flowering year they simply do not take the trouble to look around even with a 2For1 entry offer.

Rhododendron viscosum on the drive. I have never taken in this elderly late flowering species here before. The one at Burncoose is paler and a bit later to flower. Nice scent.

Rhododendron viscosum
Rhododendron viscosum
Rhododendron viscosum
Rhododendron viscosum
Rhododendron viscosum
Rhododendron viscosum
There are three separate clumps of Rhododendron indicum on the drive. Perhaps some are Rhododendron nakaharae types? There are three distinct pink forms here and they flower sporadically over a long period.
Rhododendron indicum
Rhododendron indicum
Rhododendron indicum
Rhododendron indicum
Rhododendron indicum
Rhododendron indicum
This is a late evergreen azalea with orangeish flowers. More in a big clump by the Fernery. No idea of a name.
evergreen azalea with orangeish flowers
evergreen azalea with orangeish flowers
evergreen azalea with orangeish flowers
evergreen azalea with orangeish flowers
Another clump of low growing indicum or are they dwarf enough to be nakaharae? More assorted colours here as they cover the entire bank.
low growing indicum
low growing indicum
low growing indicum
low growing indicum
low growing indicum
low growing indicum
Another forgotten but now sizeable and mature Styrax japonicus ‘Pink Chimes’ hidden away in the back of the drive. Not quite as pink in bud or when first out as the one on the bank by the Trevanion Holly but a weeping habit here as there.
Styrax japonicus ‘Pink Chimes’
Styrax japonicus ‘Pink Chimes’
Styrax japonicus ‘Pink Chimes’
Styrax japonicus ‘Pink Chimes’
Deutzia ‘Strawberry Fields’ is just going over by the Hovel. Superb as usual.
Deutzia ‘Strawberry Fields’
Deutzia ‘Strawberry Fields’
Deutzia ‘Strawberry Fields’
Deutzia ‘Strawberry Fields’
First flowering of three small Rhododendron cumberlandense. One more red than the others which have a yellowish orange flash. Could the red one be Rhododendron flammeum instead? Both are native species to the southern USA.
Rhododendron cumberlandense
Rhododendron cumberlandense
Rhododendron cumberlandense
Rhododendron cumberlandense
The best thing in the ‘nothing to see’ garden today may well be Cornus kousa ‘Doubloon’ which is far further out than most others. Huge bracts which completely obscure the leaves. What a sight!
Cornus kousa ‘Doubloon’
Cornus kousa ‘Doubloon’
Cornus kousa ‘Doubloon’
Cornus kousa ‘Doubloon’
Cornus kousa ‘Doubloon’
Cornus kousa ‘Doubloon’

2016 – CHW
Here are the latest leaf pictures, studio taken by Karol, of Michelia floribunda and Michelia doltsopa from Tregrehan. These show that the former species has a leaf petiole or leaf ‘scar’ of circa 50mm in length while the latter has a ‘scar’ of only circa 20mm in length. Apparently this is the only way to separate these two pretty obviously identical species in terms of habit, leaf size/shape and flowers. My paper disputing this conclusion is nearly finished and I hope to promote some argument.
leaf petiole
leaf petiole
leaf petiole
leaf petiole
leaf petiole
leaf petiole
2015 – CHW
Another wander up the top part of the drive.  Just by the start of Hovel Cart Road is yet another rather good deciduous azalea with no name. There are several still out but you have to hunt them down amid the greenery.

Azalea no name
Azalea no name
Azalea no name
Azalea no name
Azalea no name
Azalea no name
Deutzia ‘Strawberry Fields’ by the Hovel Turning is one of those shrubs which can readily leap out of a smaller garden into a woodland context. For what it is worth I do not think you will find a better deutzia despite all the recent new species introduced by Roy Lancaster and others.
Deutzia ‘Strawberry Fields’
Deutzia ‘Strawberry Fields’
Deutzia ‘Strawberry Fields’
Deutzia ‘Strawberry Fields’
Deutzia ‘Strawberry Fields’
Deutzia ‘Strawberry Fields’

We have just missed Sorbus folgneri ‘Emiel’ in flower at Red Linney. This was a selection by Pavia nurseries and has attractive drooping new growth. Good autumn colour apparently but I have not noticed as yet.

Sorbus folgneri ‘Emiel
Sorbus folgneri ‘Emiel
Sorbus folgneri ‘Emiel’
Sorbus folgneri ‘Emiel’

After all the phytophthera ramorum scares I thought we had removed every larch on the place but I now discover, up from Red Linney, three cracking plants of Larix kaempferi which are looking good. This Japanese species has exceptional yellow autumn colour so we hope for the best.

Larix kaempferi
Larix kaempferi

One forgets just how large and attractive the flowers on young Quercus ilex can be. The avenue on the top drive do not all flower at the same time nor do all the trees yet seem to be old enough to do so.

Quercus ilex
Quercus ilex
Quercus ilex
Quercus ilex

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