26th June

FJ Williams Profile Picture
FJW 1955-2007
CH Williams Profile Picture
CHW 2015-
JC Williams Profile Picture
JCW 1897-1939
C Williams Profile Picture
CW 1940-1955

2018 – CHW

Hot as hell and a very dry week. Drought conditions soon.

Cotoneaster ‘Rothschildianus’ is very similar to Cotoneaster ‘Exburyensis’ except in the fruit colour. Here the former is flowering well in full sun. Sometimes referred to as Cotoneaster x walteri ‘Rothschildianus’ but Hillier’s now list it just as ‘Rothschildianus’.

Cotoneaster ‘Rothschildianus’
Cotoneaster ‘Rothschildianus’
Cotoneaster ‘Rothschildianus’
Cotoneaster ‘Rothschildianus’
Cotoneaster ‘Rothschildianus’
Cotoneaster ‘Rothschildianus’
Tilia tomentosa ‘Brabant’ has whitish new growth fading to lime green and, today, gives an interesting colour variation in foliage from a distance. This is already a big tree 10 years from planting.
Tilia tomentosa ‘Brabant’
Tilia tomentosa ‘Brabant’
Tilia tomentosa ‘Brabant’
Tilia tomentosa ‘Brabant’
Fagus sylvatica ‘Bicolor Sartinii’ has grown slowly but its leaves are an odd shape for a beech and the colour variegation is certainly unusual.
Fagus sylvatica ‘Bicolor Sartinii’
Fagus sylvatica ‘Bicolor Sartinii’
Cotoneaster salicifolius ‘Pink Champagne’ is in full flower too. We have been trying to grow the berries of this fairly rare hybrid along with others who we have given it to. It is no longer offered for sale in the horticultural trade as far as I know. Nothing pink about the flowers though.
Cotoneaster salicifolius ‘Pink Champagne’
Cotoneaster salicifolius ‘Pink Champagne’
Cotoneaster salicifolius ‘Pink Champagne’
Cotoneaster salicifolius ‘Pink Champagne’
Stewartia sinensis is still not out except for a few flowers at the very top of the tree. Stewartia pseudocamellia is long over, Stewartia rostrata going over and Stewartia pteropetiolata just reaching its best.

2017 – CHW
My father always said that this ancient clump of deepest blue hydrangeas was the only clump of true blues in the garden. In shade and in the best acidic soil he said. Today we would say that Hydrangea ‘Taube’ or Hydrangea ‘Enziandom’ were the best blues. It has not got the black stems of Hydrangea ‘Nigra’ so I suppose the best guess at a name might be Hydrangea ‘Benelux’. However, even then, the shape of the florets is different.
blue hydrangeas
blue hydrangeas
blue hydrangeas
blue hydrangeas
blue hydrangeas
blue hydrangeas
Jamesia americana is about full out below Tin Garden. This rare small shrub, known as the ‘cliff bush’, was first introduced to the UK in 1862. Not a showstopper but unusual.
Jamesia americana
Jamesia americana
Jamesia americana
Jamesia americana
Jamesia americana
Jamesia americana
Styrax japonicus ‘Snow Cone’ is now full out and living up to its name. The flowers are all concentrated at the end of the branches in clusters in a rather different format to other clones of japonicus. Very much later into flower too and well worth growing.
Styrax japonicus ‘Snow Cone’
Styrax japonicus ‘Snow Cone’
Styrax japonicus ‘Snow Cone’
Styrax japonicus ‘Snow Cone’
Styrax japonicus ‘Snow Cone’
Styrax japonicus ‘Snow Cone’
Magnolia globosa is now full out with rather more flowers than I had expected.
Magnolia globosa
Magnolia globosa
Magnolia globosa
Magnolia globosa
Magnolia globosa
Magnolia globosa
The second Rhododendron auriculatum is now out but the third in this group is still some way off. The first plant does not have the greenish blotch in the funnel of the flower which this one does.
Rhododendron auriculatum
Rhododendron auriculatum
Rhododendron auriculatum
Rhododendron auriculatum
Styrax faberi is finally full out. The petals on individual flowers are recurved when full out. Not much scent today and few bees working the tree. The flowers tend to be hidden within the tree but are quite a sight none the less. Only Styrax serrulatus has still to flower this season but S. faberi is the second last species to perform and the third largest leaves of any species here today after Styrax serrulatus and Styrax odoratissimus.
Styrax faberi
Styrax faberi
Styrax faberi
Styrax faberi
Styrax faberi
Styrax faberi
Styrax faberi
Styrax faberi
Styrax faberi
Styrax faberi

2016 – CHW
I take Alice on a long garden tour in the car – plenty of questions!The lamb is delicious. Kevin’s venison less so!

2015 – CHWThe drooping new growth on Tilia henryana is most attractive when viewed from above. This rare autumn flowering tree has distinct leaves but I had not admired the form of the new growth before.

New growth on Tilia henryana
New growth on Tilia henryana
New growth on Tilia henryana
New growth on Tilia henryana
Liriodendron tulipifera ‘Aureomarginata’
Liriodendron tulipifera ‘Aureomarginata’
Liriodendron tulipifera ‘Aureomarginata’
Liriodendron tulipifera ‘Aureomarginata’

Right beside it and absolutely stunning in the sunlight is the fully fledged Liriodendron tulipifera ‘Aureomarginata’. My father detested variegated plants but I cannot see anyone disliking this. Note the reversion to green leaves on one branch as so often happens in genetic variations of this sort. One should cut this out really but it is far too far from the ground.

Liriodendron tulipifera ‘Aureomarginata’
Liriodendron tulipifera ‘Aureomarginata’
Liriodendron tulipifera ‘Aureomarginata’
Liriodendron tulipifera ‘Aureomarginata’

2004 – FJW
Nice rain on and off for 3 days after a longer dry spell than 1988 – the best flowering season for years for nearly everything – including Philip’s one flowering for first time and Ligustrum really flowering. Azalea by front door at its best.

1988 – FJW
First rain since June 9th. A gentle soak – no great storm.

1948 – CW
The pond boat house tulip tree in flower, probably first time. Few fuschias out cut back last 2 winters. Rho stericulum x eriogonum is good also Maddeni series. Hilliers Mag macrophylla out but not true. Warm nights only now started.

1922 – JCW
These last few days have given us a little rain ¾ inch, the first for about 5 weeks of any value but the lawn is hard now.

1899 – JCW
Arums and I. throbuca very good. Some of the Henonis have only lately started. I have picked all the seed but Marvel and Recurvas, a good year for seed, but bad for bamboos. Fern spores have lately started.

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