9th June

FJ Williams Profile Picture
FJW 1955-2007
CH Williams Profile Picture
CHW 2015-
JC Williams Profile Picture
JCW 1897-1939
C Williams Profile Picture
CW 1940-1955

2017 – CHW

Time to take consolation in the styrax collection which is, in the main, now full out and rather splendid although not that obvious as you go around the garden. We need a styrax location map.

There are six separate species located above the Crinodendron Hedge. Apart from a) all were planted in only 2008 but are now 15ft plus small trees.

a) Styrax wuyuanensis has much more flower on show than last year but its semi trailing habit has led to one branch being snapped off in Monday’s storm. Good scent and loads of bees. Unusual bark too.

Styrax wuyuanensis
Styrax wuyuanensis
Styrax wuyuanensis
Styrax wuyuanensis
Styrax wuyuanensis
Styrax wuyuanensis
Styrax wuyuanensis
Styrax wuyuanensis
Styrax wuyuanensis
Styrax wuyuanensis
b) Styrax japonicus ‘Fargesii’ is only just out. The numbers of flowers in each cluster is less than on our older Styrax japonicus and the leaves are slightly larger and darker green. The individual flowers are perhaps a little larger too but you would be pushed to separately identify the two if you did not know. Clearly this is a clonal variety and not a separate species as thought until fairly recently.
Styrax japonicus ‘Fargesii’
Styrax japonicus ‘Fargesii’
Styrax japonicus ‘Fargesii’
Styrax japonicus ‘Fargesii’
Styrax japonicus ‘Fargesii’
Styrax japonicus ‘Fargesii’
Styrax japonicus ‘Fargesii’
Styrax japonicus ‘Fargesii’
Styrax japonicus ‘Fargesii’
Styrax japonicus ‘Fargesii’
Styrax japonicus ‘Fargesii’
Styrax japonicus ‘Fargesii’
c) Styrax hemsleyanus – I had thought that we had not replaced our old original plant which died but I was wrong. This species has long racemes of flowers (rather than clusters) from the tip of the new growth. Not perhaps quite such a visual impact but conspicuously different. Quite different from Styrax hookeri and no confusion between the two once you see them together.
Styrax hemsleyanus
Styrax hemsleyanus
Styrax hemsleyanus
Styrax hemsleyanus
Styrax hemsleyanus
Styrax hemsleyanus
Styrax hemsleyanus
Styrax hemsleyanus
Styrax hemsleyanus
Styrax hemsleyanus
Styrax hemsleyanus
Styrax hemsleyanus
d) Styrax formosanus – today this small tree is absolutely plastered in flower. Quite the most floriferous of the species. Many more flowers than leaves on the tree. Bees aplenty and a strong jasmine scent pervades the air. The bark is quite striking too.
Styrax formosanus
Styrax formosanus
Styrax formosanus
Styrax formosanus
Styrax formosanus
Styrax formosanus
Styrax formosanus
Styrax formosanus
Styrax formosanus
Styrax formosanus
Styrax formosanus
Styrax formosanus
e) Alongside it is Styrax formosanus hayatianus which has different bark and is not nearly so floriferous or (today) as scented. The leaves are larger and darker. The leaf to flower ratio is much more in favour of the leaf too.
Styrax formosanus hayatianus
Styrax formosanus hayatianus
Styrax formosanus hayatianus
Styrax formosanus hayatianus
Styrax formosanus hayatianus
Styrax formosanus hayatianus
Styrax formosanus hayatianus
Styrax formosanus hayatianus
Styrax formosanus hayatianus
Styrax formosanus hayatianus
f) Styrax faberi has yet to come out but note how different in size the leaves are to Styrax formosanus and a very different shape to Styrax hemsleyanus too.
Styrax faberi
Styrax faberi
Styrax faberi
Styrax faberi
I had to ask Tom Hudson’s help in differentiating between Styrax hemsleyanus (right) and Styrax hookeri (left). Here is the picture he kindly sent me. Styrax hookeri has five to seven axillary leaf veins whereas Styrax hemsleyanus has seven to ten.
Styrax hemsleyanus and hookeri (Tom Hudson)
Styrax hemsleyanus and hookeri (Tom Hudson)
Here is Styrax hookeri, one of five semi mature trees, which we have grown from seed ourselves. The flowers are fairly sparse compared to other species and well hidden in the foliage. The leaves have yellowish brown stellate hairs and the flowers have very yellow pronounced anthers. This species is nearly over today and many flowers have dropped.
Styrax hookeri
Styrax hookeri
Styrax hookeri
Styrax hookeri
Styrax hookeri
Styrax hookeri
Another plant in Kennel Close of Styrax formosanus var hayatianus has more flower in full sun than e) above.
Styrax formosanus var hayatianus
Styrax formosanus var hayatianus
Then I discover yet another new variety – Styrax japonicus ‘Jippei-Kawamure’ flowering for the first time also in Kennel Close but only planted recently. Quite large flowers but too young to yet clearly identify exactly why this variety was given a clonal name.
Styrax japonicus ‘Jippei-Kawamure’
Styrax japonicus ‘Jippei-Kawamure’
Styrax japonicus ‘Jippei-Kawamure’
Styrax japonicus ‘Jippei-Kawamure’
Styrax japonicus ‘Jippei-Kawamure’
Styrax japonicus ‘Jippei-Kawamure’

2016 – CHW
Our hotel is Wolesley Lodge, a spanking new product of the Irish golfing boom and bust, just outside Tullow which, as a town, would rank below Redruth in terms of affluence. Its £53.40 per night for an excellent double room with bath and shower and air conditioning in including breakfast (€12.96). Two nights stay for both of us for £110! Clearly whichever bank own this emporium for golfers is making the best of a bankrupt job.A tedious and very delayed flight back where Aer Lingus cannot find a plane and we end up on a Belgian airline with rather puzzled cabin crew who have little idea where Newquay is. One passenger tells another that ‘Newquay is a shithole’. I get the impression all passengers are either not on the right flight or drunk. That is really how Ireland ‘works’! I am reminded of JCW’s will where he forbade the family ever from investing in Africa or Ireland.
Claimed a scalp
Claimed a scalp

Meanwhile the garden team have finished clearing in the rookery and claimed a scalp!

The caption says it all.

2015 – CHW
There are several ancient clumps of Rhododendron indicum alongside the Rockery, in the Auklandii Garden and near the Top Lodge.  These plants are commonly known as Indian azaleas or Azalea macrantha.  They were planted in large clumps and vary in colour from dark red to pink.  The flowers are often sparse and not all the flowers come out at once so the overall effect is limited.  Nevertheless these azaleas really are the last vestige of the spring woodland garden season.
AZALEA indica various colours
Rhododendron indicum
AZALEA indica various colours
Rhododendron indicum
AZALEA indica various colours
Rhododendron indicum
AZALEA indica various colours
Rhododendron indicum
AZALEA indica various colours
Rhododendron indicum
AZALEA indica various colours
Rhododendron indicum
AZALEA indica various colours
Rhododendron indicum
frogs
Tiny Frogs

While going past the Rockery Karol and I suddenly notice a swarm of tiny young frogs crossing the drive and heading away from the pond presumably to hide in the cool rocks and moss in the Rockery.  Lizzie noticed these three days ago going downhill so it must be a hell of a migration.  Presumably the tadpoles lived in the stream below Bond Street and, having developed into tiny frogs, have started a long and dangerous migration.  All very strange and novel.  Some look more like tiny toads while others are clearly frogs.  There are many thousands at it!

1941 – CW
Magnolias parviflora, wilsoni, sinensis at best as a whole. Watsoni, fraseri, prostrata, denudata all good. Still a few conspicua and double camellias. Rho Cornish Loderi fully out, Ponticum and Fortunei in Beech Walk really a fine mass – Auklandii almost over. Azaleas very good. Rain in time but not for Amoena, all small due to May drought and cold.

1897 – JCW
Sowed the first lot of daff seed.

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