16th November

FJ Williams Profile Picture
FJW 1955-2007
CH Williams Profile Picture
CHW 2015-
JC Williams Profile Picture
JCW 1897-1939
C Williams Profile Picture
CW 1940-1955

2017 – CHW

Only one seed pod on Stewartia sinensis and poor autumn colour or I have missed it?

Stewartia sinensis
Stewartia sinensis
A young Stewartia monodelpha has rather nice autumn tints.
Stewartia monodelpha
Stewartia monodelpha
Stewartia monodelpha
Stewartia monodelpha
Another young Stewartia sinensis has some decent autumn colour still in place.
A young Stewartia pseudocamellia var koreana is not bad either.
Stewartia pseudocamellia var koreana
Stewartia pseudocamellia var koreana
Pterostyrax triloba is however still green.
Pterostyrax triloba
Pterostyrax triloba
Pterostyrax triloba
Pterostyrax triloba
Stewartia serrata is colouring as a young plant in a similar manner to some (not all) of our Stewartia rostratas. It can only get better with age.
Stewartia serrata
Stewartia serrata
Stewartia serrata
Stewartia serrata

2016 – CHW
Camellia x williamsii ‘November Pink’ has only two flowers out and the odd bud showing on the now huge and very elderly plant in the Main Quarry. We have all known it out earlier and this is easily proved if you examine the diary. I fear the plant will need a stern pruning soon as it is getting straggly with some dieback. It has not enjoyed the wind up its bum for the last 10 years since all the ponticum was
removed from the nearby hedge.
Camellia x williamsii ‘November Pink’
Camellia x williamsii ‘November Pink’
Camellia x williamsii ‘November Pink’
Camellia x williamsii ‘November Pink’
2015 – CHW
The ancient bank of erica at the Four in Hand is just starting to come out as a light pink. Is this one of the Lanarth bred hybrids by P D Williams? Perhaps ‘St Keverne’. By heather standards it has already lived three lifetimes on this hot dry bank which was completely covered 40 years ago.
bank of erica
bank of erica
bank of erica
bank of erica
Liriodendron tulipifera has shed in the wind but the sides of the drive show what the gales tore off.
Liriodendron tulipifera
Liriodendron tulipifera
The first daffodil bulbs are just showing by The Fernery on the edge of the drive. Not unusual but quite a surprise as it is every year in a mild wet autumn with no hint of a frost as yet. They will be in flower in February.
The first daffodil bulbs
The first daffodil bulbs
Carpinus betulus still retains enough leaves to show itself off but it is too dull a day for a decent show. Hornbeams are seldom found in Cornish woodland but are an attractive tree, especially the fastigiate form planted along the roadsides below Two Hills which will one day be a feature avenue.
Carpinus betulus
Carpinus betulus
Carpinus betulus
Carpinus betulus

A few nasty looking red fungi on the lawn which the pheasants are clearly enjoying – or something is! No idea what they are or if poisonous.

red fungi
red fungi

1992 – FJW
November Pink has been out for some time – wet and warm alternates with cold.

1947 – CW
Almost frost last night. Cam sasanqua very good seldom more flower at one time. Oleifera out on wall and just one in wood. Lapageria and Yellow Hammer (Rho) good. Hardly any other flower except fuchsias.

1935 – JCW
Cold but no real cold. Magnolia delavayi is moving past notwithstanding the rough and cold winds.

1932 – JCW
Several C sasanqua are very good indeed. Lapagerias holding on well. We cleared the big fuchsia hedge next to the Green Gate.

1926 – JCW
C sasanqua and lapageria remain good. No E darleyense yet. Many scraps of rhodo species as Mucronulatum, Neriiflorum, Decorum, Lutescens, perhaps out forms Dicroanthum hybrid wild. Cotoneaster salicifolia and Stransvaesia salicifolia are the best things showing colour.

1915 – JCW
Only about 6 buds on Camellia sasanqua here but plenty at Werrington. The heath, E darleyense have begun to open, but the lapageria is the only thing really making a show.

1904 – JCW
Camellia sasanqua very fine indeed. No break in the weather, much leaf on yet, a few more daffs up.

1900 – JCW
Picked an Iris stylosa.