23rd November

FJ Williams Profile Picture
FJW 1955-2007
CH Williams Profile Picture
CHW 2015-
JC Williams Profile Picture
JCW 1897-1939
C Williams Profile Picture
CW 1940-1955

2020 – CHW

Cornus capitata with its huge ripe and over ripe strawberry-like fruits which the pheasants are now starting to eat. The branches are bowed down with the weight of the fruits.

Cornus capitata
Cornus capitata
Cornus capitata
Cornus capitata
Cornus capitata
Cornus capitata
Malus x micromalus still covered in yellow fruits and standing out well with no leaves now above the greenhouse.
Malus x micromalus
Malus x micromalus
Malus x micromalus
Malus x micromalus
Ilex latifolia now with ripe red berries which the birds have already been eating.
Ilex latifolia
Ilex latifolia
Camellia sasanqua ‘Gay Border’ seems very similar to ‘Versicolor’ and ‘Narumigata’ to me. Nice enough today with perhaps slightly larger flowers than the other two and an upright habit.
Camellia sasanqua ‘Gay Border’
Camellia sasanqua ‘Gay Border’
Camellia sasanqua ‘Gay Border’
Camellia sasanqua ‘Gay Border’
Camellia sasanqua ‘Gay Border’
Camellia sasanqua ‘Gay Border’
Zanthoxylum coreanum is another species with nasty prickles and ‘pepper’ fruits. We now have four species at least of this gardener’s horror.
Zanthoxylum coreanum
Zanthoxylum coreanum
Zanthoxylum coreanum
Zanthoxylum coreanum
A cluster of berries on Photinia niitakayamensis. We saw this once before when it was outside the greenhouse awaiting planting out.
Photinia niitakayamensis
Photinia niitakayamensis
Quercus rugosa is getting away well and now around 7ft tall.
Quercus rugosa
Quercus rugosa
Quercus rugosa
Quercus rugosa
Nice colours on the yellow leaved Liquidambar styraciflua ‘Golden Sun’.
Liquidambar styraciflua ‘Golden Sun’
Liquidambar styraciflua ‘Golden Sun’
Liquidambar styraciflua ‘Golden Sun’
Liquidambar styraciflua ‘Golden Sun’
Carpinus rankanensis still in full leaf. The other species in Kennel Close have already shed.
Carpinus rankanensis
Carpinus rankanensis
Carpinus kawakamii proving it is an evergreen tree here.
Carpinus kawakamii
Carpinus kawakamii
A good clump of Camellia sasanqua ‘Narumigata’ in Rogers Quarry showing up well today.
Camellia sasanqua ‘Narumigata’
Camellia sasanqua ‘Narumigata’
Seeds picked from Crataegus aprica today in the drizzle. Another thing for Asia to try to grow. Our plant is grafted.
Crataegus aprica
Crataegus aprica

2019 – CHW
Two cherries stand out with autumn colour below the castle today:Prunus ‘Gyoiko’ has a dullish brown hue as its leaves turn but not bad from a distance.

Prunus ‘Gyoiko’
Prunus ‘Gyoiko’
Prunus ‘Gyoiko’
Prunus ‘Gyoiko’
However Prunus ‘Matsumae Beni-yutaka’ has exceptional orange and red autumn colour as you can see here in various stages. Not sure how these two have survived the recent gales.
Prunus ‘Matsumae Beni-yutaka’
Prunus ‘Matsumae Beni-yutaka’
Prunus ‘Matsumae Beni-yutaka’
Prunus ‘Matsumae Beni-yutaka’
Prunus ‘Matsumae Beni-yutaka’
Prunus ‘Matsumae Beni-yutaka’
Prunus ‘Matsumae Beni-yutaka’
Prunus ‘Matsumae Beni-yutaka’
Liquidambar styraciflua ‘Golden Sun’ with wonderful red autumn colour. The new leaves may be yellow but the winter colour is not!
Liquidambar styraciflua ‘Golden Sun’
Liquidambar styraciflua ‘Golden Sun’
Liquidambar styraciflua ‘Golden Sun’
Liquidambar styraciflua ‘Golden Sun’
Betula luminifera ‘White House Farm’ is in the frames for planting out but its yellow autumn colours nearly hide next spring’s catkins.
Betula luminifera ‘White House Farm’
Betula luminifera ‘White House Farm’
Betula luminifera ‘White House Farm’
Betula luminifera ‘White House Farm’
Betula luminifera ‘White House Farm’
Betula luminifera ‘White House Farm’

2018 – CHW
Strong easterly gales persist.A week or 10 days on the autumn colours on Liriodendron chinense have darkened and easterly gales have removed most of the show. What is left is a gorgeous yellow. This was the best autumn colour in the garden this year I think.
Liriodendron chinense
Liriodendron chinense
Liriodendron chinense
Liriodendron chinense
Liriodendron chinense
Liriodendron chinense
Liriodendron chinense
Liriodendron chinense
The first flowers on Camellia ‘Cornish Snow’ are too high up the plant to photograph properly in the wind but plenty of lower buds nearly out. A little early in comparison to previous years?
Camellia ‘Cornish Snow’
Camellia ‘Cornish Snow’
Magnolia leaves everywhere under the Magnolia x veitchii and Magnolia campbellii after the east wind.
Magnolia leaves
Magnolia leaves

2017 – CHW
Stones raked off the new Isla Rose Plantation ready for planting soon. A huge area to deal with.
Stones raked off the new Isla Rose Plantation
Stones raked off the new Isla Rose Plantation
Stones raked off the new Isla Rose Plantation
Stones raked off the new Isla Rose Plantation

2016 – CHW
The ancient Camellia sasanqua ‘Narumigata’ on the top wall is full out. The size is slightly smaller than the newer plants photographed a few days ago. There is certainly far less of a pink flash on the buds and on the petals especially when they are fully open. The tree is flowering well now that some of the overhanging ilex oak has been pruned back to give more light. An excellent display in fact. The leaves are smaller and lighter green too than the modern plant sold under the same name. One could argue that the newer version is better but there is far more scent on this much older plant which I think I personally prefer. John Bond, a former Keeper of the Gardens at Windsor, always said ours was the true original sasanqua ‘Narumigata’.
Camellia sasanqua ‘Narumigata’
Camellia sasanqua ‘Narumigata’
Camellia sasanqua ‘Narumigata’
Camellia sasanqua ‘Narumigata’
Camellia sasanqua ‘Narumigata’
Camellia sasanqua ‘Narumigata’
Camellia sasanqua ‘Narumigata’
Camellia sasanqua ‘Narumigata’
Camellia sasanqua ‘Narumigata’
Camellia sasanqua ‘Narumigata’
Camellia sasanqua ‘Narumigata’
Camellia sasanqua ‘Narumigata’

2015 – CHW

I have resisted the opportunity in this diary to pay my most sincere compliments and respects to Anthony Fortescue and his family for over a fortnight. Anthony was my successor as High Sheriff of Cornwall last spring but sadly and inexplicably committed suicide a fortnight ago. His achievements in restoring Boconnoc House to its former glory are immense. My Aunt Veryan worked there for several years helping organise events in the house. Not long ago I attended an excellent High Sheriff dinner there hosted by Anthony. Why do gentle, nice and capable friends do something like this? I will never understand but let us stick to plants and their problems here.

The revolting Jeremy Corbyn is making a buffoon of himself over war in Syria. Last week Edwina found, in the archives, an account of my great uncle’s death in the Great War and I include it here for (further) posterity. How my great grandfather ‘gardened’ after this which clearly nearly destroyed him?  Perhaps he enjoyed gardening because of this (and other) wartime tragedies.

More photos of nice plants. Let us stop being morbid!

1989 – FJW
First frost of the back end.

1959 – FJW
Extraordinary year. November Pink never better. Flowers on Oleifera very large. Early plant of the Rho ruboginosum by Georges Hut covered with flower. Arboreums above Orchid House trying to come out. Enkianthus colour excellent. Fear few magnolias to flower in spring.

1926 – JCW
The Cardinal willow in the sun is very good indeed. Sasanquas are nice. The first white Daphne mezereum has been showing colour for some days. Two of the Maddeni hybrids on the hall mantlepiece have remained good there for 12 days, buds opening really well. Picked I stylosa.

1919 – JCW
Bits of Rhodo’n flower have begun to push again after the frost. Hydrangeas remain good also some roses and lapagerias.