11th October

FJ Williams Profile Picture
FJW 1955-2007
CH Williams Profile Picture
CHW 2015-
JC Williams Profile Picture
JCW 1897-1939
C Williams Profile Picture
CW 1940-1955

2017 – CHW

A trip to below Slip Rail to view the autumn colour.

Cotoneaster frigidus ‘Inchmery’ now has much more riper fruit than I saw a week ago. Asia will need the long handled pruners to gather up enough seed to send to David West. It is faintly apricot in colour now having been yellow earlier.

Cotoneaster frigidus ‘Inchmery’
Cotoneaster frigidus ‘Inchmery’
Cotoneaster frigidus ‘Inchmery’
Cotoneaster frigidus ‘Inchmery’
Cotoneaster frigidus ‘Inchmery’
Cotoneaster frigidus ‘Inchmery’
Cercidiphyllum japonicum nearby is turning colour nicely. Before the 1990 hurricane a UK record tree grew exactly here.
Cercidiphyllum japonicum
Cercidiphyllum japonicum
Cercidiphyllum japonicum
Cercidiphyllum japonicum
As is the old Acer henryi at the top.
Acer henryi
Acer henryi
Acer henryi
Acer henryi
Meanwhile Tetracentron sinense, with its odd leave structure, is not.
Tetracentron sinense
Tetracentron sinense
Tetracentron sinense
Tetracentron sinense
Eriobotrya deflexa still has its wonderful reddish-bronze new growth.
Eriobotrya deflexa
Eriobotrya deflexa
Eriobotrya deflexa
Eriobotrya deflexa
And Liriodendron chilense is just starting to turn.
Liriodendron chilense
Liriodendron chilense
Liriodendron chilense
Liriodendron chilense

2016 – CHW
The first flowering seen here of Clethra pringleyi and very late in the season it is too. Not remarkably different from other clethra species in all other respects I suggest but nice enough today.
Clethra pringleyi
Clethra pringleyi
Clethra pringleyi
Clethra pringleyi
Here is the split in half Magnolia ‘Tropicana’ which I mentioned as a recent wind casualty earlier last week.
Magnolia ‘Tropicana’
Magnolia ‘Tropicana’

2015 – CHWOsmanthus yunnanense now growing into a large shrub. We must cut the old plants back at Georges Hut so they can reshoot. The immature foliage here has spines on the leaves which you do not see on mature plants. Still too immature to flower but will not be long.

Osmanthus yunnanense
Osmanthus yunnanense
Osmanthus yunnanense
Osmanthus yunnanense

Just the odd flower left on Eucryphia lucida. This plant seems to be out much later than the plants at the top of the garden which I photographed ages ago.

Eucryphia lucida
Eucryphia lucida
Eucryphia lucida
Eucryphia lucida

1930 – JCW
Lapagerias and cyclamen are good. Neriiflorums quite nice. Several new rhodo’s to flower, also Sargentii and Denudata seedling.

1928 – JCW
Came home from the north, a good season for plants but a dry August to mid Sept, perhaps the best corn and hay harvest known, a bad season for rhodo buds.

1920 – JCW
Came from Scotland this morning. The villages and towns of Cornwall all lack water in many places as never before, but things like evergreen oaks, magnolias and the smaller rhodo’s in well dug and well mulched beds look very well indeed but it is a poor flowering year.

1925 – JCW
Came from Scotland and London last night, many things have done well, a few dead or sulky but on the whole a really good season with more flower bud on the small things than for some time.

1921 – JCW
Came from Scotland after the drought of our time. The ground is very dry now but I don’t see the dead plants I expected to see. N.B it took about 2-3 years to show them.

1917 – JCW
Home from Scotland, 24 species of rhodo’n in flower. it has been very hot and dry and there should be many deaths amongst the shrubs. N.B there were in 1920.

1911 – JCW
Solanums, lapagerias and cyclamen all very good. C paniculata very fine. Many, probably all the big Chinese have set for flowers, and many of them for the first time. Camellia sasanqua in flower and full of promise.

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