13th October

FJ Williams Profile Picture
FJW 1955-2007
CH Williams Profile Picture
CHW 2015-
JC Williams Profile Picture
JCW 1897-1939
C Williams Profile Picture
CW 1940-1955

2019 – CHW

The sasanqua camellias have arrived from France for Beatrice’s christening planting at the entrance to the Old Park probably in February 2020. There may be a chance to get these in the ground shortly. Most of the
flowers have been shaken off or damaged in transit but more buds to come. Exciting new things for the garden!

sasanqua camellias
sasanqua camellias
Amongst them is Camellia sasanqua ‘Elfin Rose’ which is new to us. Small but pretty and an odd pinkish-red colour.
Camellia sasanqua ‘Elfin Rose’
Camellia sasanqua ‘Elfin Rose’
I went to see if there was any fallen seed under the Manglietia insignis in the Rookery. Nothing, sadly, but underneath the adjacent Quercus acuta there were loads of acorns. All the clusters are sadly too small to be viable (like the Q. lamellosa acorns seen earlier) BUT I did find 2 decent acorns which had formed properly as you can see. Asia can try these and perhaps inspect the other large Q. acuta trees to try to find a few more decent acorns. We have never found acorns on Q. acuta in the past.
Quercus acuta
Quercus acuta

Quercus acuta

So back to the Sorbus problems mentioned a day or two ago. The first of these leaves is from what is labelled here as Sorbus wilsoniana. Most of the leaves on this young plant have already fallen and this small leaf does not have 7-9 pairs of leaflets but I suspect it is true to name nevertheless. The second two pictures are of a leaf from the supposed Sorbus sargentiana which does key out more or less correctly (IDS yearbook 2019 again Pages 62 – 66) as far as I can see EXCEPT that the fruits are bright red and not orange as they should be. Neither appear to be Sorbus splendens. So the muddle and confusion persists unabated. I must get Tom involved in this quiz or debate.
Sorbus wilsoniana
Sorbus wilsoniana
Sorbus wilsoniana
Sorbus wilsoniana
Sorbus wilsoniana
Sorbus wilsoniana
To try to explain – these 3 Sorbus species have been muddled for years but, only recently, has S. splendens been determined as a separate and exciting new species.
Sorbus splendens – leaflets in 4-6 pairs equal at base, fruits dark orangeSorbus sargentiana – leaflets in 4-7 pairs with pale hairs below, fruits orange (not how the
third picture shows the leaves)

Sorbus wilsoniana – leaflets in 7-9 pairs, glabious but pale in colour below, fruits red. (ie the second 2 pictures featured here – PERHAPS! but search also for earlier pictures of fruit of this species in the diary)

I am not allowed to copy the IDS yearbook but you can see more details of these 3 species (without being and IDS member) on their website.

2018 – CHW
Cotoneaster moupinensis with large black fruits. The first time we have seen these on a young plant.
Cotoneaster moupinensis
Cotoneaster moupinensis
The seeds I photographed earlier on Sorbus wilsoniana have now turned an attractive bright red.
Sorbus wilsoniana
Sorbus wilsoniana
Sorbus wilsoniana
Sorbus wilsoniana
Even now the remnants of The Beast are still showing up. Luma apiculata (Myrtus luma) has considerable bark split from the cold although the scars are starting to heal naturally. I was quite surprised that more of our Myrtus luma did not die in the cold easterly blast but the damage is still evident.
Luma apiculata
Luma apiculata
Luma apiculata
Luma apiculata
Nearly ripe seeds on Camellia reticulata ‘Mary Williams’.
Camellia reticulata ‘Mary Williams’
Camellia reticulata ‘Mary Williams’
Clethra pringlei is now full out. The very last of the Clethra to flower here. It looked badly damaged in March but has clearly recovered enough to flower properly.
Clethra pringlei
Clethra pringlei
Clethra pringlei
Clethra pringlei

2017 – CHW

Another clump of Rhododendron ‘Norfolk Candy’ full out by Georges Hut.

Rhododendron ‘Norfolk Candy’
Rhododendron ‘Norfolk Candy’
Rhododendron ‘Norfolk Candy’
Rhododendron ‘Norfolk Candy’
The Cladastris kentuckea has already shed almost all its leaves. We saw it starting to colour only three weeks ago but have missed it at its very best.
Cladastris kentuckea
Cladastris kentuckea
Another one for David West! What is this cotoneaster then? Berries just starting to turn yellow and plenty of them. A drooping habit from 20ft or so and very distinct bark. This, like the other cotoneaster, was a 1991 gift from Windsor.
What is this cotoneaster
What is this cotoneaster
What is this cotoneaster
What is this cotoneaster
What is this cotoneaster
What is this cotoneaster
What is this cotoneaster
What is this cotoneaster
What is this cotoneaster
What is this cotoneaster
Little seed on any of the Michelia doltsopas this year and far from ripe yet.
Michelia doltsopas
Michelia doltsopas
Michelia doltsopas
Michelia doltsopas
The huge seed pods on Magnolia sargentiana robusta in the ririei clearing are shedding to the ground from the open pods high up the tree. Time to start collecting them on the ground before the mice get them.
Magnolia sargentiana robusta
Magnolia sargentiana robusta
Magnolia sargentiana robusta
Magnolia sargentiana robusta

2016 – CHW
I thought we had a second, more mature, medlar and here it is, laden with large fruits, in Kennel Close. The tree needs re-staking but may already be too large to re-erect.
more mature, medlar
more mature, medlar
more mature, medlar
more mature, medlar
Sorbus japonica has its first ever ripe seeds. Only two clusters and I missed the flowers. Nice foliage with silvery undersides. It has made good growth since planting in 2009 although not in a very visible place.
Sorbus japonica
Sorbus japonica
The rare Carpinus tschonoskii has reddening autumn leaves on the ends of its new growth. Rather attractive and unexpected on a hornbeam. There are several new (to us) species in Kennel Close and this is the only one with decent autumn colour.
Carpinus tschonoskii
Carpinus tschonoskii
Carpinus tschonoskii
Carpinus tschonoskii
Styrax americanus is laden with seed and, although the leaf is dropping, they are still not ripe.
Styrax americanus
Styrax americanus
Styrax americanus
Styrax americanus

2015 – CHW

No hint of autumn yet on Quercus dentata ‘Carl Ferris Miller’ which has enormous and beautifully formed leaves. These fade late in the year and remain on the tree over winter. Signs here and there of major secondary new growth after the rain. What a tree!

Quercus dentata ‘Kal Ferris Miller’
Quercus dentata ‘Carl Ferris Miller’
Quercus dentata ‘Kal Ferris Miller’
Quercus dentata ‘Carl Ferris Miller’

1997 – FJW
November Pink had a flower – seen by John Morley.

1994 – FJW
After a wet September, we are now enjoying a fortnight of Indian summer.

1945 – CW
Very little out. Cyclamen, Rho Yellow Hammer and a few Decorums. Camellia sasanqua – many have flowers. Lapagerias and fuchsias still nice. No frost.

1933 – JCW
I came home from the north. There has been a lot of rain after a big shortage.

1932 – JCW
I came home from the north, a very favourable summer and it looks as if magnolias and rhododendrons have a fair lot of buds. Clematis panniculata is very good indeed. Hydrangeas are nice, are not very blue.
Fuchsias for the first time are most excellent, they give us more colour and variety of colour than any other shrub.

1912 – JCW
I came from Scotland. Hydrangeas good, and so Solanum.. The flower of Rho auriculatum open and some R decorum and keysii. C corymbosa good, a few roses about.

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