16th October

FJ Williams Profile Picture
FJW 1955-2007
CH Williams Profile Picture
CHW 2015-
JC Williams Profile Picture
JCW 1897-1939
C Williams Profile Picture
CW 1940-1955

2017 – CHW

The second ancient Camellia sasanqua (pink) is suddenly out too.

Camellia sasanqua (pink)
Camellia sasanqua (pink)
Camellia sasanqua (pink)
Camellia sasanqua (pink)
Camellia sasanqua (pink)
Camellia sasanqua (pink)
Also the first flowers on the largest white Camellia sasanqua.
largest white Camellia sasanqua
largest white Camellia sasanqua
The second, smaller, white Camellia sasanqua is further out. Two days ago nothing.
smaller, white Camellia sasanqua
smaller, white Camellia sasanqua
smaller, white Camellia sasanqua
smaller, white Camellia sasanqua
Fuchsia and white Camellia sasanqua both in flower side by side!
Fuchsia and white Camellia sasanqua
Fuchsia and white Camellia sasanqua
The first Camellia sasanqua which suddenly flowered 10 days ago is now over and shedding petals furiously as the wind gets up. A short and sweet flowering season.
Camellia sasanqua which suddenly flowered 10 days ago
Camellia sasanqua which suddenly flowered 10 days ago
Camellia sasanqua which suddenly flowered 10 days ago
Camellia sasanqua which suddenly flowered 10 days ago
A little passing damage which blocked the drive, thanks to Ophelia.

2016 – CHW
To Bond Street for a quick review of newer plants here and one or two surprises.Eupatorium ligustrinum, the late season flowering plant which butterflies adore, is nearly over with some flower head clusters already brown and seed setting while others are still out and a fluffy white. I see this is now renamed as Agerantina liguistrina at some botanist’s whim. A plant from Mexico and Costa Rica.
Eupatorium ligustrinum
Eupatorium ligustrinum
Eupatorium ligustrinum
Eupatorium ligustrinum
This clump of five malus came as seed from Werrington ages ago. The crab apple fruits are golden yellow and ripe now but I do not know the species. Slow growing and only about 8ft tall after 25 to 30 years. Quite large leaves for a malus.
fruits are golden yellow
fruits are golden yellow
fruits are golden yellow
fruits are golden yellow
One seedling however is clearly a hybrid with reddish fruits and a larger taller tree. Could it be a pyrus rather than a malus?
reddish fruits
reddish fruits
Taxodium distichum var imbricatum’Nutans’ is new in the Burncoose catalogue for 2017. Here is a more mature plant with graceful ascending branches about to turn yellow. Again the name has been ‘botanised’ to make it more complicated.
Taxodium distichum var imbricatum’Nutans’
Taxodium distichum var imbricatum’Nutans’
2015 – CHW
Some rather dull subjects today in an admittedly dull part of the garden around the camellia foliage plantation above the Auklandii Garden. There are three possibly self sown or possibly hidden because dull plants of Photinia (I think) davidiana with nearly ripe fruit. The leaf looks a bit different to the Burncoose plants above the tennis court in full sun. Here they are in full shade.
Photinia davidiana
Photinia davidiana
Photinia davidiana
Photinia davidiana

I have tried several times to get young plants of Quercus suber away but they have always died of cold in immaturity. Here one is at last growing in a very poor position and heavily propped up by stakes. The bark is beginning to look cork like as it should.

Quercus suber
Quercus suber
Quercus suber
Quercus suber
Quillaja saponaria
Quillaja saponaria

Quillaja saponaria, the soap bark tree, is rather aptly alongside the cork oak. It is a tender evergreen of little merit and one of the dullest worst selling items in the Burncoose catalogue. Then an ilex which I had always believed to be Ilex verticellata but now I am not so sure as this looks like an evergreen to me and Ilex verticellata is deciduous. The new growth stems are black so I should easily be corrected by someone on this old plant.Looking around this whole area is shaded by four or five large sycamores which have no place here and are taking all the light. Could we fell them easily? Probably but we would gain little new planting space. Jaimie wants to ditch the nearby laurel clump this autumn which will make a little space.

1961 – FJW
First flowers Nov Pink well out.

1954 – CW
Only one or 2 white buds on Camellia sasanqua – most of whites over are Maddeni x . Royal Flush a lot out. Hydrangeas some well. All very late and a wet summer. Rockery Tree ferns picked up a bit but old ones in Drive very bad. Fuchsias nice. Some lapagerias.

1948 – CW
Returned from North. Harvest good but plenty of rain. Fuchsias very good. Lapagerias still nice. Stable white Sasanqua out and an odd bit of pink. Pound gate Yellow Hammer rhododendron has been good. Almost no magnolia seed. Some bits of Auriculatum and its hybrid. A few daffs breaking ground. A few bits of Maddeni hybrid. Both plants of best dead.

1944 – CW
The white Camellia sasanqua by stables fully out and a few pink. Rho Yellow Hammer good. A few Auriculatum hybrids left. There have been some bad storms and a lot of rain. Last week 3 big branches off the tall Insignis.

1924 – JCW
I took a nice bunch of Hippophaeoides, Scintillans, Saluensis, Russatum x Primulinum to Wilson. C panniculata nice but not good. It is the same with bloom on many things. A late and sunless season but great growth.1908 – JCW
See some Polyanthus above ground, Camellia sasanqua is open. R nobleanum open in the drive.

1903 – JCW
I saw the first of the above in flower, Sasanqua well out.

1898 – JCW
Several Polyanthus above ground.

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