17th October

FJ Williams Profile Picture
FJW 1955-2007
CH Williams Profile Picture
CHW 2015-
JC Williams Profile Picture
JCW 1897-1939
C Williams Profile Picture
CW 1940-1955

2017 – CHW

Asia has very cleverly spotted that what is labelled Lardizabala biternata in the greenhouse does not conform with a Google search. Although it does look quite similar until it is actually in flower. What we have I think, as Asia has correctly identified, is something called Boquila trifoliolata. I had not realised we had a picture of the boquila actually in flower but here it is. I cannot remember who gave us this plant originally, which we had been propagating for the last three years. Two have been planted out this spring so we will have to check if they are hardy enough to survive! Pictures of the lardizabala and our boquila are attached.

Lardizabala biternata
Lardizabala biternata
More damage in the garden from ‘storm’ Ophelia than we thought!
damage in the garden from ‘storm’ Ophelia
damage in the garden from ‘storm’ Ophelia
damage in the garden from ‘storm’ Ophelia
damage in the garden from ‘storm’ Ophelia
damage in the garden from ‘storm’ Ophelia
damage in the garden from ‘storm’ Ophelia
damage in the garden from ‘storm’ Ophelia
damage in the garden from ‘storm’ Ophelia

2016 – CHW
Still carrying on in Bond Street.Clethra delavayi, planted in 2008, is laden with ripening seed. The plant by Higher Quarry Nursery died this year after only about 20 years of over-seeding. One flower remains out hidden in the small tree which this plant now is.
Clethra delavayi
Clethra delavayi
Clethra delavayi
Clethra delavayi
Clethra delavayi
Clethra delavayi
Pterostyrax corymbosus was also planted in 2008 by the clethra. Pterostyrax hispida is much better known than this rarity which has yet to flower. The habit is erect and the leaves not entirely styrax-like.
Pterostyrax corymbosus
Pterostyrax corymbosus
Pterostyrax corymbosus
Pterostyrax corymbosus
Ailanthus altissima var tanake was planted in 2015 but is already quite huge. Something has eaten out the leading leaf bud for next year which I fear is a squirrel. The leaves are even larger than the ‘ordinary’ ailanthus. A ‘tree of heaven’ indeed!
Ailanthus altissima var tanake
Ailanthus altissima var tanake
Ailanthus altissima var tanake
Ailanthus altissima var tanake
A dwarfish sorbus species growing with several stems to 5 or 6ft only has a few small clusters of pure white berries. Cannot find this in the planting records but it has been here for 20 years or more.
a few small clusters of pure white berries
a few small clusters of pure white berries
Cornus florida ‘Daybreak’ is turning colour nicely at the Four in Hand.
Cornus florida ‘Daybreak’
Cornus florida ‘Daybreak’
Cornus florida ‘Daybreak’
Cornus florida ‘Daybreak’

2015 – CHW
Double day let shoot starts today but a quick early sprint to the Rookery finds yet another magnolia with a few shitty secondary flowers. This time Magnolia ‘Apollo’ hidden away beside three rather thriving young Michelia doltsopas which are well on their way.

A good well established Styrax hookeri nearby too. I fear that I made a terrible cock up in the early summer when I called these Styrax hemsleyanus in error. Quite a few times too but no one called me out. The bark colouration is very distinct. It is only when you get together with someone who really knows like Tom Hudson that you can start to correct your own howlers.

Styrax hookeri (1)
Styrax hookeri
Styrax hookeri (2)
Styrax hookeri
Styrax hookeri (3)
Styrax hookeri

I am pretty certain too now that what I photographed as Osmanthus yunnanensis last week was wrong too. Another plant seen today has absolutely no spines on its leaves and what I saw was probably Osmanthus armatus or Osmanthus x burkwoodii. If the former it should flower soon. Another young Osmanthus yunnanensis has been trimmed by deer and is nearly dead.Perhaps, over the weekend, I will photograph all the seven youngish styrax species with leaf and fruit above the Crinodendron Hedge or perhaps all the other new liquidamber varieties planted along Sinogrande Walk. The styrax you will say are rather dull but not to me!

I actually went to the Rookery to look again at the possibility of felling the laurel and four to six over mature beeches castle side of the nursery bed to make a big new planting area. The last surviving mature elm in the garden is hidden away here and it is a cold spot. Perhaps more crucially a big new clearing here would encourage the pheasants to fly the wrong way out of the Rookery. Needs more thought but not a huge job to achieve.

1992 – FJW
First proper frost last night – a good year for Ilex seed.

1987 – FJW
During night major 15/16 great storm hit London and Kent – Kew very badly damaged and Royal Parks.

1927 – JCW
Not so many rhodo’s as in 1917. Hoheria on the wall is good, the hydrangeas in the Drive remarkable, some Maddeni x and a Decorum are in the back.

1917 – JCW
Much as in 1916, we have corn out now, Clematis panniculata is very good indeed.

1916 – JCW
No frost. Solanum, lapagerias, cyclamen, hydrangeas all useful. Rhodo’s neriiflorum, decorum, scintillans, 10333, fastigiatum, raniosisimums, lepidotum and racemosum all show bits of flower, and primulinum.

1906 – JCW
No frost and begonia etc etc V.G. Sweet peas just over.

1905 – JCW
First hard and white frost knocked out the gunnera. No rain for weeks and no daffs but polyanthus in sight. Roses good, all fuchsias and soft stuff cut out.

1901 – JCW
A few daffs besides Polyanthus coming through the ground, mainly maximus. I picked a lot of yellow Polyanthus Primrose. D phaloenopsis is at its best. I saw the first Iris stylosa.

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