29th October

FJ Williams Profile Picture
FJW 1955-2007
CH Williams Profile Picture
CHW 2015-
JC Williams Profile Picture
JCW 1897-1939
C Williams Profile Picture
CW 1940-1955

2019 – CHW

A search for some surviving autumn colour after the gales have led to heavy leaf falls. Most trees and shrubs with heavy seeds will now be scattered on the ground and not on the tree.

Enkianthus can be a startling mix of colours even as small plants.

Enkianthus
Enkianthus
Rhododendron schlippenbachii is even finer than we saw it starting to turn colour a few weeks ago in this diary.
Rhododendron schlippenbachii
Rhododendron schlippenbachii
I am worried at the state of the leaves on the record sized evergreen Quercus lamellosa. It has not been cold and yet the leaves already look as though they have had a cold winter.
Quercus lamellosa
Quercus lamellosa
Acer takesimense has coloured even more in the last three days.
Acer takesimense
Acer takesimense
Acer takesimense
Acer takesimense
Acer rubrum ‘Red Sunset’ is now 20ft+ tall but the leaf is being blown away before it can begin to colour up properly as it should. At Burncoose this tree has performed well in the garden but only in a crisp, dry and coldish autumn. We are currently in a prolonged wet patch.
Acer rubrum ‘Red Sunset’
Acer rubrum ‘Red Sunset’
Acer rubrum ‘Red Sunset’
Acer rubrum ‘Red Sunset’
Acer heldreichii only has half decent autumn colour on one more sheltered branch. The rest already blown away. This species would have good potential in a different autumn.
Acer heldreichii
Acer heldreichii
Prunus incisa looks as though it is about to produce a decent show of autumn colour if the gales abate.
Prunus incisa
Prunus incisa
Prunus incisa
Prunus incisa
Cotoneaster moupinensis still has a fine crop of black berries intact on the shrub which is now 6-8ft tall.
Cotoneaster moupinensis
Cotoneaster moupinensis
Cotoneaster moupinensis
Cotoneaster moupinensis
Prunus ‘Hally Jolivette’ might also produce some half decent colour if we had the appropriate weather but, I suspect, it too will be blown away in the wet before anything much happens.
Prunus ‘Hally Jolivette’
Prunus ‘Hally Jolivette’
Prunus ‘Hally Jolivette’
Prunus ‘Hally Jolivette’

2018 – CHW
Sorbus forrestii by the Top Lodge. This plant was given to us by Trevor Green in 2003.
Sorbus forrestii
Sorbus forrestii
Sorbus forrestii
Sorbus forrestii
A Mahonia lomariifolia which I had forgotten about near the Top Lodge.
Mahonia lomariifolia
Mahonia lomariifolia
Another unidentified Sorbus near the Top Lodge.
unidentified Sorbus
unidentified Sorbus
unidentified Sorbus
unidentified Sorbus
The tree fern on the Main Ride now uncovered as the laurel has been cut back around it.
tree fern
tree fern
Good autumn colour on Stewartia pseudocamellia. Considerably better than last year’s effort.
Stewartia pseudocamellia
Stewartia pseudocamellia

2017 – CHW
Good yellow colouring on Halesia carolina above the Auklandii Garden.
Halesia carolina
Halesia carolina
Halesia carolina
Halesia carolina
Also on Cornus ‘Eddies White Wonder’ nearby.
Cornus ‘Eddies White Wonder’
Cornus ‘Eddies White Wonder’
Cornus ‘Eddies White Wonder’
Cornus ‘Eddies White Wonder’
The stump of the old oak tree felled by tree surgeons recently has been turned into a seat for visitors.
turned into a seat
turned into a seat
turned into a seat
turned into a seat
The new shop and sales point is taking shape and now has a waterproof roof!
new shop and sales point
new shop and sales point

2016 – CHW
Just look and wonder at this lot as a comparison of wonderful colour:Pseudowintera colorata ‘Red Leopard’ – stunning form.
Pseudowintera colorata ‘Red Leopard’
Pseudowintera colorata ‘Red Leopard’
Pseudowintera colorata ‘Red Leopard’
Pseudowintera colorata ‘Red Leopard’
Pseudowintera colorata – quite bland by comparison.
Pseudowintera colorata
Pseudowintera colorata
Pseudowintera colorata
Pseudowintera colorata
Pseudowintera colorata ‘Red Glow’ – different again.
Pseudowintera colorata ‘Red Glow’
Pseudowintera colorata ‘Red Glow’
Pseudowintera colorata ‘Red Glow’
Pseudowintera colorata ‘Red Glow’
Pseudowintera colorata ‘Moulin Rouge’ – some way between all of them.
Pseudowintera colorata ‘Moulin Rouge’
Pseudowintera colorata ‘Moulin Rouge’
Pseudowintera colorata ‘Moulin Rouge’
Pseudowintera colorata ‘Moulin Rouge’
These pseudowintera are each very aptly named but you can only really see them at their best together in October/November. What a thing to brighten up an overcast autumn day!
Compare these to the show today of the cotinus varieties in the nursery:Cotinus coggygria – who would not grow this for autumn colour!
Cotinus coggygria
Cotinus coggygria
Cotinus coggygria
Cotinus coggygria
Cotinus coggygria ‘Smoky Joe’ – hints of yellow in the darker red.
Cotinus coggygria ‘Smoky Joe’
Cotinus coggygria ‘Smoky Joe’
Cotinus coggygria ‘Smoky Joe’
Cotinus coggygria ‘Smoky Joe’
Cotinus coggygria ‘Young Lady’ – some yellow with the red.
Cotinus coggygria ‘Young Lady’
Cotinus coggygria ‘Young Lady’
Cotinus coggygria ‘Young Lady’
Cotinus coggygria ‘Young Lady’
Put the two together and you would have one hell of an autumn colour border. Just add a few nerines and there you are!

2015 – CHW
Two more sarcococcas out (or nearly out) in the Auklandii Garden. Both are less well known species in UK gardens and undeservedly so.

Sarcococca wallichii has a strong and not unpleasant smell with large flowers by sarcococca standards. Planted in 2008 it looks to be taller growing than other species and seems to like shade as here. Eventually four to five feet in height I would guess.

Sarcococca wallichii
Sarcococca wallichii
Sarcococca wallichii
Sarcococca wallichii

Sarcococca orientalis was a Roy Lancaster introduction in 1980. It has an attractive domed and compact habit which makes it a good small garden plant for a shady site. Not really a Caerhays type plant atall but none the worse for that. I think Roy gave it to us in 2006.

Sarcococca orientalis
Sarcococca orientalis

2001 – FJW
Thomas Williams arrived in the world.

1968 – FJW
Nov Pink flower picked.

1961 – FJW
Poppet died [Pekinese].

1950 – CW
Camellia oleifera picking for house otherwise as 10 days ago.

1924 – JCW
(Election Day). A long continued shower began in April not finished yet. No Sasanquas open, not many hybrids. Hydrangeas good.

1923 – JCW
Great rains this month and winds but after the hard summer of 1921 some ground is quite dry. 4 big old Argenteums are killed by it.

1922 – JCW
Three weeks of dry, cold winds and now snow. No planting so far.

1921 – JCW
The ground remains too dry to plant and has been since May. Roses and lapagerias are nice. So far the autumn colours have not come.

1907 – JCW
A Camellia sasanqua is just open, a fair lot of roses, many lapagerias, ¾ of the cyclamen, some are over. Very heavy rains for weeks on most days, some corn cut in Wendron now.

1905 – JCW
Two or three Cam sasanqua’s open, one (M x jonq) seedling up in the pans, the rain began two days ago.

1904 – JCW
Camellia sasanqua well out, some nice roses. Lapagerias and solanums good. It remains very fine up to now and dry.

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