13th January

FJ Williams Profile Picture
FJW 1955-2007
CH Williams Profile Picture
CHW 2015-
JC Williams Profile Picture
JCW 1897-1939
C Williams Profile Picture
CW 1940-1955

2021 – CHW

The first snowdrops really are out.

snowdrops
snowdrops
The Trevanion holly on the drive is shedding a lot of green leaves. We have seen this before on common hollies in damp wet periods in winter. Another Phytophthora which seems to harm, but not kill, holly trees. They end up with dead lower branches. I have not seen much of this this year but it would be sad to lose this historic plant which must be 200 years old.
Trevanion holly
Trevanion holly

Then to Burncoose – facemasks now and the nursery is shut to the public to show pandemic solidarity but also to prepare for the spring rush and get the place tidy without customers.

The new lorry loading and EU plant quarantine shed by the main packing shed is now finished and the concrete dry. A great achievement by the landscape team and nursery staff.

shed
shed
shed
shed
shed
shed
Newly potted herbaceous plants outside now fill half the long bed to start the season off again in earnest.
herbaceous plants
herbaceous plants
The Musa basjoo (banana) has not enjoyed the recent cold.
Musa basjoo
Musa basjoo
A huge seedpod fell off a cycad during unloading and ripe seeds are starting to pop out. Not sure which species this was from.
seedpod
seedpod
seedpod
seedpod

Lots of Hamamelis looking splendid:Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Arnold Promise’

Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Arnold Promise’
Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Arnold Promise’
Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Copper Beauty’ (syn. ‘Jelena’)
Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Copper Beauty’ (syn. ‘Jelena’)
Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Copper Beauty’ (syn. ‘Jelena’)
Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Diane’
Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Diane’
Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Diane’
Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Aphrodite’
Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Aphrodite’
Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Aphrodite’
Hamamelis japonica ‘Brentry’
Hamamelis japonica ‘Brentry’
Hamamelis japonica ‘Brentry’
Hamamelis mollis ‘Coombe Wood’
Hamamelis mollis ‘Coombe Wood’
Hamamelis mollis ‘Coombe Wood’
Hamamelis mollis ‘Jermyn’s Gold’
Hamamelis mollis ‘Jermyn’s Gold’
Hamamelis mollis ‘Jermyn’s Gold’
Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Firecracker’ (syn. ‘Magic Fire’ or ‘Feuerzauber’)
Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Firecracker’ (syn. ‘Magic Fire’ or ‘Feuerzauber’)
Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Firecracker’ (syn. ‘Magic Fire’ or ‘Feuerzauber’)
The Northern Polytunnels lorry unloads our new multi span tunnel.
Northern Polytunnels
Northern Polytunnels
The Pittosporum tunnel all tidied and ready for spring.
Pittosporum tunnel
Pittosporum tunnel
Similarly the Yuccas, Cordyline and Phormium.
Yuccas, Cordyline and Phormium
Yuccas, Cordyline and Phormium
Acacia rhetinodes just coming out.
Acacia rhetinodes
Acacia rhetinodes
Ribes sanguineum ‘White Icicle’ just out but frosted.
Ribes sanguineum ‘White Icicle’
Ribes sanguineum ‘White Icicle’

2020 – CHW
The new bait in the squirrel traps is showing signs of working immediately! Sunflower seeds are working.

A large tree falls at the Green Gate blocking the drive and making quite a mess. The rotten beech tree had a nest of honey bees in it but they appear to have moved on.

nest of honey bees
nest of honey bees
nest of honey bees
nest of honey bees
nest of honey bees
nest of honey bees
nest of honey bees
nest of honey bees
This is what happens when you plant a Fraxinus excelsior ‘Jaspidea’ too close to a bonfire. I fear the tree may succumb to ash dieback disease soon anyway.
Fraxinus excelsior ‘Jaspidea’
Fraxinus excelsior ‘Jaspidea’

2019 – CHW
The last bit of leaf blowing up on the garden paths prior to opening in mid February. A few branches had fallen down onto some camellias beside the path below Burns Bank. These have now been pollarded and tidied up.
tidied up
tidied up
tidied up
tidied up
Camellia ‘Cornish Spring’ is one of those that did not need tidying up – with just a few early flowers.
Camellia ‘Cornish Spring’
Camellia ‘Cornish Spring’
John Anderson, the keeper of the gardens from The Crown Estate at Windsor, called this week with a few plants as gifts for us. Sadly I have been tied up with the funeral arrangements and have not yet even been able to see the plants or begin to look up what peculiar, rare, unusual and possibly tender introductions these might be. This will have to wait until after the funeral on 19th January. However, the list is as follows:

Cyclocurya paliuris (SICH 1784)

Cyclocurya paliuris
Cyclocurya paliuris
Ehreitia macrophylla
Ehreitia macrophylla
Ehreitia macrophylla
Ehreitia macrophylla
Ehreitia macrophylla
Liquidambar styraciflua ‘Silver King’
Liquidambar styraciflua ‘Silver King’
Liquidambar styraciflua ‘Silver King’
Acer tegmentosum ‘Valley Phantom’
Acer tegmentosum ‘Valley Phantom’
Acer tegmentosum ‘Valley Phantom’
Acer tegmentosum ‘Valley Phantom’
Acer tegmentosum ‘Valley Phantom’
Acer tegmentosum ‘Valley Phantom’
Acer tegmentosum ‘Valley Phantom’
Mahonia x savilliana Clone 7
Mahonia x savilliana Clone 7
Mahonia x savilliana Clone 7
Mahonia x savilliana Clone 7
Mahonia x savilliana Clone 7
Mahonia x savilliana Clone 7
Mahonia x savilliana Clone 7

2018 – CHW
Acer albopurpurascens (CWJ 12361) is another new one to us. Clearly evergreen here and not much like an acer in leaf at all. New growth has just hardened off – hopefully enough to survive a cold snap.

Acer albopurpurascens
Acer albopurpurascens
Acer albopurpurascens
Acer albopurpurascens
Acer albopurpurascens
Acer albopurpurascens
Self sown rhododendron seedlings near the stump of a dead plant. Clearly all sorts of pollination here.
rhododendron seedlings
rhododendron seedlings
Ucodendron whartonii (BJWJ 11706) is doing well in its deer shelter and there may even be flower buds forming. Older leaves have good white undersides. Younger leaves have a touch of purple indumentum underneath. Those in between nothing. The plant is again evergreen with us and still putting on growth in winter which may well prove to be a mistake in future cold spells.
Ucodendron whartonii
Ucodendron whartonii
Ucodendron whartonii
Ucodendron whartonii
Ucodendron whartonii
Ucodendron whartonii
Ucodendron whartonii
Ucodendron whartonii
Ucodendron whartonii
Ucodendron whartonii
As we saw earlier the base of the largest Daphniphyllum macropodum is now completely rotten and the plant is turning yellow. This is the second or third mature plant to have died from the base up. I do not think it was rabbits originally. Only one decent plant of this size left now on the drive.
Daphniphyllum macropodum
Daphniphyllum macropodum
Daphniphyllum macropodum
Daphniphyllum macropodum

2017 – CHW
First wild daffodil out at the Four in Hand.
wild daffodil
wild daffodil

Snowdrops around the daffodils.

Snowdrops
Snowdrops

A pheasant has half eaten this early daffodil flower.

A pheasant has half eaten this early daffodil flower.
A pheasant has half eaten this early daffodil flower.

More snowdrops are out properly. First individual flower a week ago.

More snowdrops
More snowdrops

2016 – CHW
Azalea ‘Hinomayo’ now nearing a full flush of flower.

Azalea ‘Hinomayo’
Azalea ‘Hinomayo’
Azalea ‘Hinomayo’
Azalea ‘Hinomayo’

Fuchsia flowers still in abundance and some leaves still on the plants.

Fuchsia
Fuchsia
Fuchsia
Fuchsia

1964 – FJW
Cold spell back after a fortnight of warm.

1931 – JCW
This varies hardly at all from the last few years, it is really the worst time in all the year, if the H mollis were taken away there would be nothing but Camellia speciosa.

1929 – JCW
Just as in 1923 and very little to be seen, it is cold for planting, the wind has been East for some time.

1924 – JCW
R lutescens the early form is vg and so is mucronulatum at its very best.

1923 – JCW
This follows a late cold and wet summer and not much is moving, but after the Hamamelis mollis and E darleyensis there is not very much else.

1919 – JCW
I saw a plant of Ordus mascula coming up. 10 species of Rhodoⁿ show flower of which Barbatum and moupinense at the best. Cyclamen coum is coming on. Hamamelis mollis has been out for a fortnight.

1912 – JCW
A seedling trumpet (poor) is in flower and 35 blooms of Narcissus clusii are open at once, a good few Soleil D’or open.

1909 – JCW
One third of the daffs show up. Several Camellias, C coum very good, R nobleanum is nice, Ericas good – very. Snowdrops are nice, one trumpet shows colour.

1898 – JCW
40 or 50 Crocus out. Picked several spikes of Iris germanica. Most of the tulips above ground. No sign of Madam de Graaf, about 100 of Engelhart’s seedlings show up.