24th June

FJ Williams Profile Picture
FJW 1955-2007
CH Williams Profile Picture
CHW 2015-
JC Williams Profile Picture
JCW 1897-1939
C Williams Profile Picture
CW 1940-1955

2023 – CHW

The very ancient dark red Azalea indica outside the front door.

Azalea indica
Azalea indica
Below the lawn a rather attractive wild flower which I do not remember seeing before, at least as such a stand out flower. Galium verum or Lady’s Bedstraw I think.
Galium verum or Lady’s Bedstraw
Galium verum or Lady’s Bedstraw
Galium verum or Lady’s Bedstraw
Galium verum or Lady’s Bedstraw
Lady Cynthia Carew Pole’s day lilies as good as over by the tower. The original names long last but I try to piece together what they might be.
This looks like Hemerocallis ‘Marion Vaughn’.
Hemerocallis ‘Marion Vaughn’
Hemerocallis ‘Marion Vaughn’
Hemerocallis ‘Marion Vaughn’
Hemerocallis ‘Marion Vaughn’
Unknown.
Unknown
Unknown
Perhaps Hemerocallis lilioasphodelus.
Hemerocallis lilioasphodelus
Hemerocallis lilioasphodelus
Unknown.
Unknown
Unknown
Hemerocallis ‘El Desperado’.
Hemerocallis ‘El Desperado’
Hemerocallis ‘El Desperado’
Possibly Hemerocallis ‘Catherine Woodbury’.
Hemerocallis ‘Catherine Woodbury’
Hemerocallis ‘Catherine Woodbury’
Tropaeolum ciliatum full out by the Georgian Hall.
Tropaeolum ciliatum
Tropaeolum ciliatum

2022 – CHW
Grass cutting starts in Penvergate with two machines. There are two plants of Aesculus wilsonii here and one has done especially well.
Aesculus wilsonii
Aesculus wilsonii
Aesculus wilsonii
Aesculus wilsonii
The Azalea indica by the front door is covered in flower all at once. A far better flowering than for years.
Azalea indica
Azalea indica
Flower buds nearly open on Clethra kaipoensis.
Clethra kaipoensis
Clethra kaipoensis
Syringa yunnanensis (SBEC 1022) planted in 2015 is now multi stemmed and 10-12ft tall with most flowers at the top of the new large shrub.
Syringa yunnanensis
Syringa yunnanensis
Cornus hongkongensis just coming out. Not many bracts this year and the best plant blown over last year below Hovel Cart Road.
Cornus hongkongensis
Cornus hongkongensis
Rhododendron auriculatum with some drought dieback. One to collect seed from in case it dies after this excessive flowering.
Rhododendron auriculatum
Rhododendron auriculatum
A young Euonymus tingens with its purple speckled flowers. This becomes a tree but our original introduction has few flowers in its old age.
Euonymus tingens
Euonymus tingens
Ilex gagnepaniana going ahead well.
Ilex gagnepaniana
Ilex gagnepaniana
A young Staphylea bumalda (BSWJ 11053) has dieback after planting last year. It appears to be the true species unlike the plant on Rookery Path which is labelled S. bumalda but is probably a hybrid with S. colchica.
Staphylea bumalda
Staphylea bumalda
Dipelta floribunda with seed capsules. Dipelta have short but spectacular lives.
Dipelta floribunda
Dipelta floribunda
Styrax americanus – Kankakea Form – is now properly out.
Styrax americanus – Kankakea Form
Styrax americanus – Kankakea Form
A wonderful show on Magnolia sieboldii on the Main Ride. Small flowers on this form.
Magnolia sieboldii
Magnolia sieboldii
I have missed the flowers on Magnolia rostrata this year.
Magnolia rostrata
Magnolia rostrata
Schefflera species Nova (NJM 13.118) with its gigantic new growth.
Schefflera species Nova
Schefflera species Nova
Metapanax davidii with slug damage on the new growth.
Metapanax davidii
Metapanax davidii
Now off to the Isle of Wight.

2021 – CHW
Hydrangea seemanii will shortly be out.

Hydrangea seemanii
Hydrangea seemanii
The pink form of Rhododendron decorum at its best.
Rhododendron decorum
Rhododendron decorum
Styrax wilsonii now properly out with bees in attendance.
Styrax wilsonii
Styrax wilsonii
Styrax americanus is not quite out yet beside it.
Styrax americanus
Styrax americanus
Fagus sylvatica ‘Purpurea Pendula’
Fagus sylvatica ‘Purpurea Pendula’
Fagus sylvatica ‘Purpurea Pendula’
Fagus sylvatica ‘Purpurea Pendula’
Fagus sylvatica ‘Purpurea Pendula’
Had we been at the Hampton Court show in 10 days’ time this would have been a feature plant – Lomatia ferruginea at its best. We pruned up the lower branches last autumn and the trunk is producing new shoots.
Lomatia ferruginea
Lomatia ferruginea
Lomatia ferruginea
Lomatia ferruginea
Ligustrum confusum with huge inflorescences.
Ligustrum confusum
Ligustrum confusum
The attractive bark of Maytenus boaria with some branches weeping and drooping as is normal.
Maytenus boaria
Maytenus boaria
Maytenus boaria
Maytenus boaria
Another separate plant of Maytenus boaria has much more erect and upright branches.
Maytenus boaria
Maytenus boaria
The oldest plant left of Rehderodendron macrocarpum is dying and half the stem is rotten.
Rehderodendron macrocarpum
Rehderodendron macrocarpum
Rehderodendron macrocarpum
Rehderodendron macrocarpum

2020 – CHW
Hovel Cart Road has been cut first this year so a trip to investigate. There are four well developed Cornus here (one over) and several younger plants with, as yet, no flower.Cornus kousa ‘Summer Stars’ is laden with bracts just turning pink. A spreading pendulous habit.
Cornus kousa ‘Summer Stars’
Cornus kousa ‘Summer Stars’
Cornus kousa ‘Summer Stars’
Cornus kousa ‘Summer Stars’
Cornus kousa ‘Schmetterling’ only has a few on the very tips of its spreading and equally pendulous branches.
Cornus kousa ‘Schmetterling’
Cornus kousa ‘Schmetterling’
Cornus kousa ‘Schmetterling’
Cornus kousa ‘Schmetterling’
Cornus ‘Eddie’s White Wonder’ is long over elsewhere but this one seems to be having a secondary flush after the recent rains. The flowers are within the plant and not standing proud to it as is normal.
Cornus ‘Eddie’s White Wonder’
Cornus ‘Eddie’s White Wonder’
Cornus ‘Eddie’s White Wonder’
Cornus ‘Eddie’s White Wonder’
The young Quercus cleistocarpa which produced a few seed heads last year with viable seed has plenty more forming this year again with secondary male flower spikes alongside. Odd bronzy new growth.
Quercus cleistocarpa
Quercus cleistocarpa
Quercus cleistocarpa
Quercus cleistocarpa
This may or may not be Viburnum globosum. Just over. There are two on the planting plans but no other Viburnums shown in this location.
Viburnum globosum
Viburnum globosum
Viburnum globosum
Viburnum globosum
Rhododendron maddenii below Donkey Shoe below the laurel hedge. Sparse flowering this year.
Rhododendron maddenii
Rhododendron maddenii
A couple of Tilia species leaves which I may have missed before at Tin Garden:
Tilia amurensis from Cholipo.
Tilia amurensis
Tilia amurensis
Tilia paucicostata recovering from drought and roe deer.
Tilia paucicostata
Tilia paucicostata
Eucryphia lucida ‘Pink Cloud’ is exceptional today at Donkey Shoe.
Eucryphia lucida ‘Pink Cloud’
Eucryphia lucida ‘Pink Cloud’
Eucryphia lucida ‘Pink Cloud’
Eucryphia lucida ‘Pink Cloud’
Magnolia ‘Silk Road’ did have its first bud but it got eaten by a squirrel as you can see. Good new growth from the rains (Magnolia tripetala x (Magnolia tripetala x Magnolia obovata)).
Magnolia ‘Silk Road’
Magnolia ‘Silk Road’
Magnolia ‘Silk Road’
Magnolia ‘Silk Road’

2019 – CHW
Time to investigate our Manglietias in flower. I have always known we had three ancient trees and been led to believe that two were M. insignis and one M. hookeri. In the event today I have actually found four veteran trees which I have tried to photograph but they are so huge and tall or enclosed by other things that I have not done this very well. Frankly I am still very puzzled as to which is which and need guidance. More excitingly, I have found three more species of Manglietia with their first flower buds here following last summer’s heat I assume.

Manglietia moto (now Magnolia kwangtungensis) with its first ever flower buds – about 10. Tom Hudson collector’s number TH 2777. Planted 2008. Orange indumentum covers the buds as well as the earlier new growth.

Manglietia moto
Manglietia moto
Manglietia moto
Manglietia moto
These two ancient Manglietias are above Crinodendron Hedge and planted side by side. The outer tepals are pink at first as you would expect with M. insignis. However the tepals recurve back under the flower as it comes out fully and the inner tepals are initially fairly erect and creamy white. Both trees are, I think, the same in flower although it can be confusing looking at the odd lower flower against the multitude at the top of the tree. The flowers are a great deal smaller than those on the young M. insignis we saw in flower last week but they would be on such an old tree. Beside these trees I find a forgotten second mature Lithocarpus cleistocarpa. Did I know it was there? Once perhaps but long since forgotten!
M. insignis
M. insignis
M. insignis
M. insignis
M. insignis
M. insignis
M. insignis
M. insignis
M. insignis
M. insignis
This is the Manglietia below Donkey Shoe. It is full out. After a great deal of looking I see no pink outer tepals but they may just have recurved under the now open flowers. From memory I have seen them pink here before. It is difficult to see how this tree is much different from M. insignis but I have no idea what M. hookeri looks like by way of comparison. So it will be down not to flower size or colour but to leaf stipule sizes and leaf nodes. New Trees does not list insignis or hookeri so I am stumped for detailed information.
Manglietia below Donkey Shoe
Manglietia below Donkey Shoe
Manglietia below Donkey Shoe
Manglietia below Donkey Shoe
Manglietia below Donkey Shoe
Manglietia below Donkey Shoe
Manglietia below Donkey Shoe
Manglietia below Donkey Shoe
Manglietia below Donkey Shoe
Manglietia below Donkey Shoe
Manglietia below Donkey Shoe
Manglietia below Donkey Shoe
I cannot find this young Manglietia caveana on any list? Perhaps I am wrong in thinking it is a Manglietia? [No it is after checking but Magnolia caveana now of course.]
Manglietia caveana
Manglietia caveana
Manglietia caveana
Manglietia caveana
Manglietia caveana
Manglietia caveana
This one is supposedly Manglietia yuyuanensis (now Magnolia yuyuanensis but apparently a synonym for Magnolia floribunda var. fardiano in Flora of China). Also with its first flowers here which we look forward to.
Manglietia yuyuanensis
Manglietia yuyuanensis
Manglietia yuyuanensis
Manglietia yuyuanensis
Manglietia yuyuanensis
Manglietia yuyuanensis
Manglietia yuyuanensis
Manglietia yuyuanensis
Manglietia yuyuanensis
Manglietia yuyuanensis
A young Magnolia sapaensis from Crug Farm (FMWJ 13315) is doing well. Only when I passed it for the third time did I notice the first three buds at different stages of development. Only three years from planting which is a big bonus. I guess it must be a Manglietia but it is, again, not on the definitive name change list.
Magnolia sapiensis
Magnolia sapiensis
Magnolia sapiensis
Magnolia sapiensis
Magnolia sapiensis
Magnolia sapiensis
Magnolia sapiensis
Magnolia sapiensis
Now to the Rookery to look at the fourth ancient tree which I had been led to believe was Manglietia hookeri (now Magnolia hookeri). The tree is so tall and enclosed by other evergreen oaks that I find more petals on the ground than I can make out clear flowers on the tree. No pink outer tepals visible but otherwise I am no further forward.
Manglietia hookeri
Manglietia hookeri
Manglietia hookeri
Manglietia hookeri
Manglietia hookeri
Manglietia hookeri
Manglietia hookeri
Manglietia hookeri
Manglietia hookeri
Manglietia hookeri
So at least we have come across three species of Manglietia which will be flowering in the next month. I wonder if they will prove to be true to name?

2018 – CHW
Yesterday a garden tour with a family whose mother works at KPK.
Chionanthus virginicus in full flower hidden away at the top of the garden in a poor spot. The one at Burncoose flowers much better albeit in dappled shade. The American fringe tree is a better bet than the Chinese one in terms of flower and shape of the plant I think (Chionanthus retusus).
Chionanthus virginicus
Chionanthus virginicus
Chionanthus virginicus
Chionanthus virginicus
Robinia hispida var kelseyi or var rosea. I am not sure and planting predates 1997 so is not yet computerised. A medium shrub with arching branches and no spines but its leaf form is not that of the R. hispida which we sell in the nursery and the flowers are not pink. Robinia hispida var kelseyi has lilac-pink flowers so that seems the best bet as far as I know.
Robinia hispida var kelseyi
Robinia hispida var kelseyi
Robinia hispida var kelseyi
Robinia hispida var kelseyi
Deutzia pulchra with its ‘lily of the valley’ drooping racemes of flowers. The buds are globular. A splendid plant introduced and given to us by Roy Lancaster.
Deutzia pulchra
Deutzia pulchra
Deutzia pulchra
Deutzia pulchra
Deutzia pulchra
Deutzia pulchra
I have just missed the pink form of Rhododendron viscosum flowering away in Old Park. A big clump which it was a surprise to find last year. One for Asia to propagate as it is perhaps nicer than the white form at Burncoose.
Rhododendron viscosum
Rhododendron viscosum
Hydrangea seemanii just coming out on the wall. Its bulbous buds are starting to spring open. I first saw this then relatively new introduction at Trevarno gardens 35 years ago by torchlight after a drunken dinner there with Peter Bickford-Smith. The gardens are no longer open to the public and are now owned by an American and a Russian.
Hydrangea seemanii
Hydrangea seemanii

2017 – CHW
To West Sussex for a 60th birthday party. A good mixed garden with many Burncoose plants. Dry but on green sand so generally water not far down into the soil.Clerodendron trochotomum ‘Carnival’ as a large shrub. We have had this in the catalogue but not recently. Clearly not tender here.
Clerodendron trochotomum ‘Carnival’
Clerodendron trochotomum ‘Carnival’
Clerodendron trochotomum ‘Carnival’
Clerodendron trochotomum ‘Carnival’
This wonderful trachelospermum surrounds the door to the garden. Is it Trachelospermum jasminoides or Trachelospermum asiaticum? The small leaf suggests Trachelospermum asiaticum but the flower is pure white and does not look to be fading to yellow as it should. The pure white flowers mean it is actually Trachelospermum jasminoides although the leaves are much smaller than the norm. A brilliant scented surround. Is this a hybrid between the two species?
Trachelospermum jasminoides
Trachelospermum jasminoides
Trachelospermum jasminoides
Trachelospermum jasminoides
Trachelospermum jasminoides
Trachelospermum jasminoides
Trachelospermum jasminoides
Trachelospermum jasminoides
Schizophragma integrifolium standing proud on a wall. Quite a sight.
Schizophragma integrifolium
Schizophragma integrifolium
Schizophragma integrifolium
Schizophragma integrifolium
Cedrus atlantica f. glauca with plenty of new cones formed on a 50 to 60 year old tree.
Cedrus atlantica f. glauca
Cedrus atlantica f. glauca
Cedrus atlantica f. glauca
Cedrus atlantica f. glauca

2016 – CHWLiberation Day!

Having spent another four hours yesterday working out how to fill in the new European woodland grant applications I now do not have to bother. So no more nonsense about climate change, priority species etc and hopefully back to basics in a new UK scheme based on timber production and landscape value. How long will that take I wonder?

2015 – CHW

Styrax japonicas
Styrax japonica
The last of the original Styrax japonicas is full out and plastered in bees. The flowers are already carpeting the ground. Two other original plants here and at Burncoose both suddenly died of old age two years ago. Over flowering probably hastened their demise.
I had forgotten that we still have one really decent clump of Rhododendron royalii ‘Pink Flush’.
Rhododendron royalii ‘Pink Flush’
Rhododendron royalii ‘Pink Flush’
Rhododendron royalii ‘Pink Flush’
Rhododendron royalii ‘Pink Flush’
Rhododendron royalii ‘Pink Flush’
Rhododendron royalii ‘Pink Flush’

Probably the best thing in the garden today and a must for propagation.  Further up Burns Bank is a large mature plant of Stewartia sinensis which is still in tight bud. The way that the bark flakes is entirely consistent with this species.

Stewartia sinensis
Stewartia sinensis
Stewartia sinensis
Stewartia sinensis
Stewartia sinensis
Stewartia sinensis

2003 – FJW
Catalpa duclouxii in flower from suckers (sign of hot summer?). Quercus oxyodon in flower (first time?).1998 – FJW
Picked flower of Sinocalyanthus – first time it has flowered here. Young Lithocarpus pachyphyllus by Charlie Michaels Nursery setting seed. Two Mag rostrata still some.1965 – FJW
A sad day, Laurence Trudgeon left after 16 years in the garden. he worked as hard on his last day as he did on his first.1962 – FJW
This has been a very late year. The drive Azaleas were at their best between June 5-15th. Falconeri is still out. Camellias in main piece and up the drive are still out. It is now hot and the first field of hay bailed.

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