21st April

FJ Williams Profile Picture
FJW 1955-2007
CH Williams Profile Picture
CHW 2015-
JC Williams Profile Picture
JCW 1897-1939
C Williams Profile Picture
CW 1940-1955

2018 – CHW

After a week of incessant rain in Ireland we discover there has been a heatwave in England. The leaves on the trees have very noticeably rushed on and not before time. Today initially is more of the same.

Magnolia ‘Goldfinch’ now full out.

Magnolia ‘Goldfinch’
Magnolia ‘Goldfinch’
Likewise Magnolia ‘Petit Chicon’.
Magnolia ‘Petit Chicon’
Magnolia ‘Petit Chicon’
Magnolia ‘Petit Chicon’
Magnolia ‘Petit Chicon’
And Magnolia ‘Anya’. Not bad! I think I saw this in an article on Arboretum Westpelaar.
Magnolia ‘Anya’
Magnolia ‘Anya’
Magnolia ‘Anya’
Magnolia ‘Anya’
Magnolia ‘Slavins No 4’ is not one I have seen before and really quite large in flower for this sort of magnolia.
Magnolia ‘Slavins No 4’
Magnolia ‘Slavins No 4’
Magnolia ‘Slavins No 4’
Magnolia ‘Slavins No 4’
One of the first Gill Hybrids to show. This is what we call Rhododendron ‘Mrs Butler’.
Rhododendron ‘Mrs Butler’
Rhododendron ‘Mrs Butler’
Rhododendron ‘Mrs Butler’
Rhododendron ‘Mrs Butler’
More lining out of young rhododendrons in the much extended Rookery nursery bed.
Rookery nursery bed
Rookery nursery bed
The nearby clearance now means one can see properly the second of our huge Magnolia x veitchii ‘Isca’.
Magnolia x veitchii ‘Isca’
Magnolia x veitchii ‘Isca’
Magnolia x veitchii ‘Isca’
Magnolia x veitchii ‘Isca’
Cyclamen coum in a wonderful group.
Cyclamen coum
Cyclamen coum
Cyclamen coum
Cyclamen coum
Rhododendron albrectii in differing colours on two neighbouring plants.
Rhododendron albrectii
Rhododendron albrectii
Rhododendron albrectii
Rhododendron albrectii
Magnolia ‘Pickards Garnet’ as good as I have ever seen it. Actually I think it is ‘Pickards Ruby’ – Garnet is nearby.
‘Pickards Ruby’
‘Pickards Ruby’
‘Pickards Ruby’
‘Pickards Ruby’
‘Pickards Ruby’
‘Pickards Ruby’
‘Pickards Ruby’
‘Pickards Ruby’
Magnolia pseudokobus ‘Kubimishimodori’ at its very best.
Magnolia pseudokobus ‘Kubimishimodori’
Magnolia pseudokobus ‘Kubimishimodori’
Magnolia pseudokobus ‘Kubimishimodori’
Magnolia pseudokobus ‘Kubimishimodori’
First flowers on Magnolia ‘Yuchelia’ that may well be wrongly named according to recent correspondence I have had. Very fine anyway.
Magnolia ‘Yuchelia’
Magnolia ‘Yuchelia’
A view of Rhododendron williamsianum x decorum hybrids.
Rhododendron williamsianum x decorum hybrids
Rhododendron williamsianum x decorum hybrids
Prunus matsumae ‘Hokusai’ with huge flowers.
Prunus matsumae ‘Hokusai’
Prunus matsumae ‘Hokusai’
Prunus matsumae ‘Hokusai’
Prunus matsumae ‘Hokusai’
Prunus ‘Hally Jolievette’ with rather smaller ones.
Prunus ‘Hally Jolievette’
Prunus ‘Hally Jolievette’
Prunus ‘Hally Jolievette’
Prunus ‘Hally Jolievette’
Rhododendron suoilenhense at its very best. No flower on the ones at Mount Congreve two days ago.
Rhododendron suoilenhense
Rhododendron suoilenhense
At last a good show on our young clump of Rhododendron williamsianum.
Rhododendron williamsianum
Rhododendron williamsianum
My father’s Rhododendron moorii x Rhododendron euchates by Georges Hut (no name yet). There are better forms than this elsewhere in the garden and at Burncoose.
Rhododendron moorii x Rhododendron euchates
Rhododendron moorii x Rhododendron euchates
Rhododendron moorii x Rhododendron euchates
Rhododendron moorii x Rhododendron euchates
Rhododendron moorii x Rhododendron euchates
Rhododendron moorii x Rhododendron euchates
Rhododendron moorii full out and very splendid today.
Rhododendron moorii
Rhododendron moorii
Rhododendron moorii
Rhododendron moorii
Rhododendron moorii
Rhododendron moorii
First flowering here of Magnolia ‘Lu Shan’. A purchase from Cherry Tree nursery and strongly recommended by them.
Magnolia ‘Lu Shan’
Magnolia ‘Lu Shan’
Magnolia ‘Lu Shan’
Magnolia ‘Lu Shan’
The view across Hovel Cart Road today.
view across Hovel Cart Road
view across Hovel Cart Road
Magnolia – label unreadable and not on the plan.
Magnolia
Magnolia
Magnolia
Magnolia
Magnolia campbellii ‘Peter Borlaise’ is a gorgeous colour. Smallish flowers but superb. I do not remember seeing this one before either. Late for a campbellii. Excellent!
Magnolia campbellii ‘Peter Borlaise’
Magnolia campbellii ‘Peter Borlaise’
Magnolia campbellii ‘Peter Borlaise’
Magnolia campbellii ‘Peter Borlaise’
An excellent yellow – must ask Jaimie which one it is. [Jaimie later tells me it is Magnolia denudata ‘Yellow River’.]
An excellent yellow
An excellent yellow
An excellent yellow
An excellent yellow
An excellent yellow
An excellent yellow
Rhododendron rubiginosum ‘Desquamatum Group’ or Rhododendron desquamatum to you and I just coming out. A little lighter in colour so far than usual.
Rhododendron desquamatum
Rhododendron desquamatum
Rhododendron desquamatum
Rhododendron desquamatum
Magnolia ‘Blushing Belle’ with its first flower with us. A ‘Caerhays Belle’ seedling I assume. Again a purchase from Cherry Tree as I remember it.
Magnolia ‘Blushing Belle’
Magnolia ‘Blushing Belle’
Magnolia ‘Purpurascens’ – we have others but first nice flowers on this one.
Magnolia ‘Purpurascens’
Magnolia ‘Purpurascens’
When we first were given Magnolia ‘Genie’ to try in the UK we put three plants in very different spots. This one is by the Four in Hand in a hot but cold location. There are plenty of flowers but the cold and wind has damaged the buds and the colour is pale.
Magnolia ‘Genie’
Magnolia ‘Genie’
Magnolia ‘Genie’
Magnolia ‘Genie’

2017 – CHW

A quick visit to The Rockery area before we set off for Wales and hopefully a visit to Bristol on the way for ‘grandpa’ to meet Isla Rose in person.

Berberis latifolia is plastered in flower and another good species which we ought to stock and sell. Quite tall growing too.

Berberis latifolia
Berberis latifolia
Berberis latifolia
Berberis latifolia
The dwarf and short lived Rhododendron camplogynum. There used to be a nice clump once in Higher Quarry Nursery. This plant too is on its last legs.
Rhododendron camplogynum
Rhododendron camplogynum
Rhododendron dendrocharis is a sparse flowerer but it likes it here in full sun and poorish soil.
Rhododendron dendrocharis
Rhododendron dendrocharis
Rhododendron dendrocharis
Rhododendron dendrocharis
Rhododendron ‘Yaku Fairy’ is a compact but vigorous rockery plant. Here quite superb in a semi shaded but damp spot.
Rhododendron ‘Yaku Fairy’
Rhododendron ‘Yaku Fairy’
Rhododendron ‘Yaku Fairy’
Rhododendron ‘Yaku Fairy’
Rhododendron ‘Yaku Fairy’
Rhododendron ‘Yaku Fairy’
Berberis insignis var insigne seems to be semi evergreen and may be in too cold a spot despite its name. A rather floppy thing needing support.
Berberis insignis var insigne
Berberis insignis var insigne
Barbara Oozeerally, the magnolia artist, has sent me a picture of what she calls the ‘stone oak’ (Lithocarpus pachyphyllus seed) painted from seed collected here. It is being exhibited in Canada. I have bought four of her magnolia paintings of Caerhays plants plus the copyrights so you will be able to see these shortly.
Lithocarpus pachyphyllus seed
Lithocarpus pachyphyllus seed

2016 – CHW
A three hour evening visit to Tregrehan to look primarily at michelias and manglietias with Jaimie and Michael. This is a record of what we saw.Magnolia sprengeri – wild collected form, has a smallish flower with 12 tepals (ie more than usual). It is a late flowerer with more buds to come.
Magnolia sprengeri
Magnolia sprengeri
Magnolia sprengeri
Magnolia sprengeri
Quercus semicarpifolia – a mature tree. The young leaves have barbed edges but mature ones do not.
Quercus semicarpifolia
Quercus semicarpifolia
Quercus semicarpifolia
Quercus semicarpifolia
Quercus semicarpifolia
Quercus semicarpifolia
Stachyurus praecox ‘Matsusaku’ is an exceptional form with much larger flower clusters than straight S praecox.
Stachyurus praecox ‘Matsusaku’
Stachyurus praecox ‘Matsusaku’
Huodendron baristratum has a wonderful trailing habit and exceptional bark. We have so far failed to establish this at Caerhays after several attempts.
Huodendron baristratum
Huodendron baristratum
Huodendron baristratum
Huodendron baristratum
Huodendron baristratum
Huodendron baristratum
Michelia ernestii (formerly M wilsonii) is in flower with a yellow scented flower. Strangely there is nothing like this at Caerhays from of old although it would be very odd if it had not arrived at all. Lots of archive work to do. Tom offers cuttings in the summer. This is a must acquire for the Caerhays collection with plenty of room to grow!
Michelia ernestii
Michelia ernestii
Michelia ernestii
Michelia ernestii
Michelia ernestii
Michelia ernestii
Michelia ernestii
Michelia ernestii
Michelia compressa – here we start to have a laugh. Burncoose bought this supposed rarity in Holland but it has fat chubby rounded leaves. Nothing even faintly like Tom’s plant which has tiny leaves, nice bark and a few tiny 2cm flowers 20-30ft up. A very dull species with a totally insignificant flower which Tom says is crap even in New Zealand where his father grew it and cut it down.
Michelia compressa
Michelia compressa
Michelia compressa
Michelia compressa
Cleyera japonica used to grow at Caerhays as a record tree by Donkey Shoe. One to reacquire.
Cleyera japonica
Cleyera japonica
Cleyera japonica
Cleyera japonica
Fokienia hodginsii – a very rare conifer which is similar to Calocedris calolepsis. Saw this once at Exbury.
Fokienia hodginsii
Fokienia hodginsii
Parkameria yunnanensis – in the Magnolia nitida category.
Parkameria yunnanensis
Parkameria yunnanensis
Parkameria yunnanensis
Parkameria yunnanensis
Parkameria yunnanensis
Parkameria yunnanensis
Michelia velutina has long pointed leaves but ‘not in the top 10 by flower’ according to Tom. Not on his list either.
Michelia velutina
Michelia velutina
Michelia velutina
Michelia velutina
Parkameria lotungensis is very similar to Magnolia nitida but the new growth is not rusty red. No flower sadly to compare.
Parkameria lotungensis
Parkameria lotungensis
Parkameria lotungensis
Parkameria lotungensis
Michelia chapensis is another glossy evergreen tree of some note. No flower sadly. Tom has just given us a plant. Cutting grown I guess.
Michelia chapensis
Michelia chapensis
Michelia chapensis
Michelia chapensis
Illicium simonsii was going over. We have this spectacular tall evergreen tree at Caerhays from Crug but the deer have trimmed it up. One for cuttings.
Illicium simonsii
Illicium simonsii
Illicium simonsii
Illicium simonsii
Illicium simonsii
Illicium simonsii
Manglietia duclouxii is very vigorous with shiny leaves.
Manglietia duclouxii
Manglietia duclouxii
Manglietia duclouxii
Manglietia duclouxii
Manglietia duclouxii
Manglietia duclouxii
Michelia platypetala we have seen also at Burncoose and Tregothnan but ours has yet to flower. Excellent scent and well worth its place. Seems hardy and quite easy to grow. Cuttings? Now renamed M cavaleriei.
Michelia platypetala
Michelia platypetala
Michelia platypetala
Michelia platypetala
Michelia platypetala
Michelia platypetala
Michelia xanthantha (now Michelia fulva var calicola) has very hairy indumentum on the bud.
Michelia xanthantha
Michelia xanthantha
Michelia xanthantha
Michelia xanthantha
Manglietia fordiana – we have this doing well at Burncoose and may soon see a flower.
Manglietia fordeana
Manglietia fordeana
Manglietia fordeana
Manglietia fordeana
Manglietia fordeana
Manglietia fordeana
Illicium yunnanense – huge trees which may have been merged into Illicium simonsii by the botanists. Cuttings here.
Illicium yunnanense
Illicium yunnanense
Illicium yunnanense
Illicium yunnanense
Manglietia yuyuanensis – this one may well be at Burncoose and Caerhays also.
Michelia fulva – we had this one, lost it and now Tom has given us one again planted by the Podocarpus salignus. Huge glossy leaves and very furry new shoots.
Michelia fulva
Michelia fulva
Michelia fulva
Michelia fulva
Manglietia Moto (now Manglietia kwangtungensis) is the one we have doing well by Georges Hut where it gets partially defoliated by wind to no ill effect.
Manglietia Moto
Manglietia Moto
Manglietia Moto
Manglietia Moto
Manglietia Moto
Manglietia Moto
Manglietia grandis has, as its name implies, huge leaves. M hookeri and M insignis are the only two old mature trees at Caerhays.
Manglietia grandis
Manglietia grandis
Manglietia grandis
Manglietia grandis
Manglietia grandis
Manglietia grandis
Michelia floribunda – now the fun really starts. The old plant at Caerhays which we have always known as M floribunda Tom (and the US expert Dick Figler) says is in fact Michelia doltsopa. This is because of the length of the leaf petioles which are here, on Tom’s plant, 50cm long WITH A SCAR on the petiole around half the length of the petiole. Our plant has a SCAR of ONLY about 25% of the length of the petiole so this makes ours M doltsopa. Apparently the leaf shape and the flower colour (totally different to ours which is yellow whereas this is clearly white) are irrelevant in making the overall identification. We yell ‘bollocks’ and say how can a petiole scar possibly be the end of it. DNA analysis is the only way to resolve this delightful argument.
Michelia floribunda
Michelia floribunda
Michelia floribunda
Michelia floribunda
Michelia floribunda
Michelia floribunda
Michelia floribunda
Michelia floribunda
Michelia floribunda
Michelia floribunda
We then move onto Tom’s (wild collected in SW Yunnan and 100 miles from his collection of floribunda) Michelia doltsopa with its smaller petiole scar which is of course also white and not creamy like our original plants. The flower shape is totally different as are the leaves. So the laughter continues. This argument is by no means over yet. Logic and common sense dictate that the Caerhays plants (the old ones anyway) are massively different. They may be Michelia manipurense but the new Chinese michelia reference book and Tom’s master list make no mention at all of M manipurense! Why should we be fooled by the size of a leaf scar for heaven’s sake and when was a leaf scar alone the key to a plant identification?
Michelia doltsopa
Michelia doltsopa
Michelia doltsopa
Michelia doltsopa
Michelia doltsopa
Michelia doltsopa
Michelia doltsopa
Michelia doltsopa
Michelia doltsopa
Michelia doltsopa
Michelia doltsopa
Michelia doltsopa
Michelia doltsopa
Michelia doltsopa
Manglietia sapaensis does not seem to be on Tom’s master list. Quite a distinct hairy covering to the new shoots.
Manglietia sapaensis
Manglietia sapaensis
Manglietia sapaensis
Manglietia sapaensis
Manglietia sapaensis
Manglietia sapaensis
Rhododendron petalottii is a superb red species and totally unknown to us.
Rhododendron petalottii
Rhododendron petalottii
Rhododendron petalottii
Rhododendron petalottii
Michelia Cavaleriei (similar to Michelia platypetala which is now Michelia cavaleriei var platypetala just to confuse us even more) – you could be forgiven for finding it bloody similar to Tom’s M doltsopa and M floribunda in terms of flowers and even the leaf although the M platypetala at Burncoose has larger leaves.
Michelia Cavaleriei
Michelia Cavaleriei
Michelia Cavaleriei
Michelia Cavaleriei
Michelia Cavaleriei
Michelia Cavaleriei
Michelia maudiae is one we thought we have by the old Lindera megaphyllas. Looking at this I am pretty sure we do. The leaves are totally glabrous with blueish undersides. The flowers are quite pointed.
Michelia maudiae
Michelia maudiae
Michelia maudiae
Michelia maudiae
Michelia maudiae
Michelia maudiae
Michelia maudiae
Michelia maudiae
Manglietia conifera (previously M chingii) is yet another thriving and hardy species which Tom has yet to see in flower.
Manglietia conifera
Manglietia conifera
Manglietia conifera
Manglietia conifera
Manglietia conifera
Manglietia conifera
Rhododendron suoilenhense is what I photographed a day or two ago at Caerhays and called it a sinogrande seedling which it is not. It is a wild collected species by Tom in 1990 to 1991. His plants are also in flower today.
To confuse you even more I attach the master list of what we saw and photographed.
Names of Manglietia and Michelia

2015 – CHW

ENKIANTHUS campanulatus 'Hollandia'
ENKIANTHUS campanulatus ‘Hollandia’

Chelsea plants in the show tunnel at Burncoose looking good.  Some of the enkianthus are out already and useless but others need to be put in the shade.  The specimen rhododendrons are still in tight bud which is excellent.  Some to go in shade and some in full sun.  Decide on what needs to go into the coldstore on 1st May.  The ferns, and especially Blechnum tabulare, look perfect and the Chatham Island forget me nots have plenty of bud which looks just right.  All a great credit to Gerry and Louisa who have done the work.

1945 – CW
It has been hot and dry for long. Heavy flowering year. Daffs all over. Cherries were good. Camellias speciosa still some flowers and a lot on the hybrids. Rho aureum at its best, also Auklandii and Loderi. 6 plants of Magnolia nitida in flower all about the same. Maddeni just out and the hybrids good. Still some Michelias.

1930 – JCW
Ten days late for most things, ⅓ of big Mag kobus are open, all the Mag salicifolia. The Dendata has been very good. Fat cherries are opening, Subhirtella has been very good. Camellia speciosa going over but the pink hybrid remains nice. Some Calophytums over, some not open. Sutchuenense over.

1929 – JCW
Truro Show tomorrow. Many gardens have frost now. Rhodo bud crop is very bad. All stuff is short of moisture. Cherries wane but have been good.

1927 – JCW
At Werrington for the day, they seem to have very little for Truro. Bobs London rhodo, outside [?] – reds and it is very hot and dry there. No sign of Auklandii here but I can hardly see a dozen buds around the house and garden.

1912 – JCW
Was at the London Show last week, only the remains of daffs there, did not go to Dinton. Camellias reticulata is over. Rho augustinii at their best, some very good Augustinii. Daffs at the tail end. Auklandii a few good trees in flower, the frost having cut most of them. One cherry (dark one) is very good, the rest over. Camellias over, Iris (van Tubergen) very good. Rho falconeri is opening. Montana rubra nice.

1910 – JCW
Came back from Dinton having bought Green Eye.

1906 – JCW
Returned from Dinton and Manglis. Dinton things nearly all burnt out, Manglis’s Royali hybrids very good.

(Cutting from magazine attached to Garden Book page, dated April 1951)

Black and white photograph of Magnolia campbellii, White form. Awarded the Royal Horticultural Society’s First-Class Certificate. Flowers pure white. Shown by C. Williams, Esq (grown by Mr C. Michael), Caerhays, Gorran, Cornwall. [21st April 1935]

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