24th April

FJ Williams Profile Picture
FJW 1955-2007
CH Williams Profile Picture
CHW 2015-
JC Williams Profile Picture
JCW 1897-1939
C Williams Profile Picture
CW 1940-1955

2017 – CHW

Now on to Llanover Court garden.

Darmeria peltata as a large clump.

Darmeria peltata
Darmeria peltata
An unusual iris growing wild in grass.
unusual iris
unusual iris

A fine mature plant of Lithocarpus henryi with similar bark and trunk to the Rosemoor plant but rather different leaves.

Lithocarpus henryi
Lithocarpus henryi
Lithocarpus henryi
Lithocarpus henryi

Quercus pontica – an elderly tree with several main stems.

Quercus pontica
Quercus pontica

Sorbus scalaris with leaves and flower forming.

Sorbus scalaris
Sorbus scalaris
Sorbus scalaris
Sorbus scalaris

Viburnum cylindricum with many berries still from last autumn. Not a species we grow but quite similar to Viburnum cinnamomifolium and Viburnum odoratissiumum in some ways.

Viburnum cylindricum
Viburnum cylindricum
Viburnum cylindricum
Viburnum cylindricum

An unknown cotoneaster full of berries too.

unknown cotoneaster
unknown cotoneaster
unknown cotoneaster
unknown cotoneaster

I think this is Chionanthus virginicus.

Chionanthus virginicus.
Chionanthus virginicus.
Chionanthus virginicus.
Chionanthus virginicus.
Chionanthus virginicus.
Chionanthus virginicus.

Koelreuteria paniculata with attractive new growth.

Koelreuteria paniculata
Koelreuteria paniculata
Koelreuteria paniculata
Koelreuteria paniculata

Quercus cadicans after a mild winter but with new growth forming.

Quercus cadicans
Quercus cadicans
Quercus cadicans
Quercus cadicans

Magnolia wilsonii early into flower in a mature tree.

Magnolia wilsonii
Magnolia wilsonii

Malus ‘Comtessa de Paris’ was especially fine.

Malus ‘Comtessa de Paris’
Malus ‘Comtessa de Paris’
Malus ‘Comtessa de Paris’
Malus ‘Comtessa de Paris’

An unidentified syringa species.

unidentified syringa species.
unidentified syringa species.
unidentified syringa species.
unidentified syringa species.

Wisteria ‘Pink Ice’ perhaps?

Wisteria ‘Pink Ice’ ?
Wisteria ‘Pink Ice’ ?
Wisteria ‘Pink Ice’ ?
Wisteria ‘Pink Ice’ ?

Wisteria venista ‘Shiro-kapitan’ just coming out.

Wisteria venista ‘Shiro-kapitan’
Wisteria venista ‘Shiro-kapitan’
Wisteria venista ‘Shiro-kapitan’
Wisteria venista ‘Shiro-kapitan’

Cydonia oblonga – as good a tree as I have seen with copious flower and attractive bark.

Cydonia oblonga
Cydonia oblonga
Cydonia oblonga
Cydonia oblonga
Cydonia oblonga
Cydonia oblonga
Cydonia oblonga
Cydonia oblonga

Dicentra ‘Valentine’ was tall growing and impressively dark in colour. Well worth growing.

Dicentra ‘Valentine’
Dicentra ‘Valentine’
Dicentra ‘Valentine’
Dicentra ‘Valentine’

Acer platanoides ‘Crimson King’ in full flower beside the Crawshay’s church.

Acer platanoides ‘Crimson King’
Acer platanoides ‘Crimson King’

Back to Llanfair Court for the grand opening of the new rockery border.

Actinidia kolomitka covering a wall.

Actinidia kolomitka
Actinidia kolomitka
Actinidia kolomitka
Actinidia kolomitka

Cutting the ribbon with Terence, Lizzie and Thomas. Big speech.

Cutting the ribbon
Cutting the ribbon
Cutting the ribbon
Cutting the ribbon
Cutting the ribbon
Cutting the ribbon
Cutting the ribbon
Cutting the ribbon
Cutting the ribbon
Cutting the ribbon
Cutting the ribbon
Cutting the ribbon

More ‘work in progress’!

‘work in progress’!
‘work in progress’!

Rhododendron groenlandicum in the new border.

Rhododendron groenlandicum
Rhododendron groenlandicum
Rhododendron groenlandicum
Rhododendron groenlandicum

Cercis siliquastrum about to open in what has become a huge spreading tree in 20 years.

Cercis siliquastrum
Cercis siliquastrum
Cercis siliquastrum
Cercis siliquastrum
Cercis siliquastrum
Cercis siliquastrum
Cercis siliquastrum
Cercis siliquastrum
Cercis siliquastrum
Cercis siliquastrum
Cercis siliquastrum
Cercis siliquastrum

Cercis chinensis ‘Avondale’ growing out of a holly hedge.

Cercis chinensis ‘Avondale’
Cercis chinensis ‘Avondale’
Cercis chinensis ‘Avondale’
Cercis chinensis ‘Avondale’

Then on to the Sugar Loaf Mountain where the Chenevix-Trenches have started a garden sunk deep in a gorge. The trees were planted 30 years ago by Rosemary Verey. Now rhododendrons are the name of the game.

Prunus serrula with tiny white flowers with the foliage. I had not seen this in flower before and will not be rushing!

Prunus serrula
Prunus serrula
Prunus serrula
Prunus serrula

A 30 year old clump of Picea omorika.

Picea omorika
Picea omorika

The summer house surrounded by young Japanese acers.

The Summer House
The Summer House

Picea breweriana doing well.

Picea breweriana
Picea breweriana
Picea breweriana
Picea breweriana
Picea breweriana
Picea breweriana

Rhododendron ‘Boddaertianum’ pinkish in bud, opening pale mauve-white.

Rhododendron ‘Boddaertianum’
Rhododendron ‘Boddaertianum’

The house from across the valley.

Llanover Court
Llanover Court

A fine clump of Euphorbia ‘Fireglow’ by the house.

Euphorbia ‘Fireglow’
Euphorbia ‘Fireglow’

As much flower as you could possibly get on the usually rather dull culinary bay tree (Laurus nobilis).

Laurus nobilis
Laurus nobilis
Laurus nobilis
Laurus nobilis
Laurus nobilis
Laurus nobilis

2016 – CHW

Sophora japonica ‘Sun King’ is full out at the greenhouse. We planted out three of these by the playhouse four to five years ago and all three are now dead from cold although one lasted a couple of years more than the others. No point really in planting this one out.

Sophora japonica ‘Sun King’
Sophora japonica ‘Sun King’
Two plants of Magnolia ‘Holland Red’ (liliiflora nigra hybrid) have flowers at the greenhouse. We had planted this out before but lost it. A smallish shrub for a good place and a late flowerer.
Magnolia ‘Holland Red’
Magnolia ‘Holland Red’
Magnolia ‘Holland Red’
Magnolia ‘Holland Red’
A group of azaleas bought at the Landriana flower show (south of Rome) below the greenhouse steps are nicely out. No idea of the proper names but they are mainly doubles. Red and pinkish-red forms are the best today. We promised the Italian grower that we would not propagate or sell these and have not! The reddish one I discover is ‘Salmon Pink Cushion’ and the pinker one is ‘Gerards Salmon’. Well worth propagating now!
Azalea ‘Salmon Pink Cushion’
Azalea ‘Salmon Pink Cushion’
Azalea ‘Salmon Pink Cushion’
Azalea ‘Salmon Pink Cushion’
Azalea ‘Gerards Salmon’
Azalea ‘Gerards Salmon’
Azalea ‘Gerards Salmon’
Azalea ‘Gerards Salmon’
Another wild collected Magnolia cylindrica is equally impressive nearby. The same as the one below the Magnolia x veitchii.
Magnolia cylindrica
Magnolia cylindrica
Magnolia cylindrica
Magnolia cylindrica
Stachyurus praecox ‘Magpie’ has attractive yellow and green variegated foliage but the flower is not bad today in the sunlight. A good spray of this on the Rosemoor show bench yesterday.
Stachyurus praecox ‘Magpie’
Stachyurus praecox ‘Magpie’
Stachyurus praecox ‘Magpie’
Stachyurus praecox ‘Magpie’
Stachyurus praecox ‘Magpie’
Stachyurus praecox ‘Magpie’
Azalea stenopetalum ‘Linearifolium’ is quite variable as to colour and the divisions in the flower. This one is in the car park and was originally from Italy. So we did propagate it after all! Different from the much older plants in the rockery and perhaps nicer?
Azalea stenopetalum ‘Linearifolium’
Azalea stenopetalum ‘Linearifolium’
Azalea stenopetalum ‘Linearifolium’
Azalea stenopetalum ‘Linearifolium’
2015 – CHW
I trip around the garden with Asia to help identify the scented rhododendrons currently in flower from which cuttings will need to be taken in four to six weeks when still soft (fragrantissimum, formosum, Princess Alice, Lady Alice Fitzwilliam, Berts Own, HarryTagg, Anne Teese, ciliicalyx, Countess of Haddington, Michaels Pride etc).
Outside the backyard on the bank are two rather different evergreen azaleas, ‘Tebotan’ and ‘Blushing Bride’.  The latter resulted from one of those Christmas time potted azaleas unusually proving to be a half decent garden plant.  Tebotan, as I remember it years ago, was a smaller bush with more delicate flowers so I may yet stand corrected on the naming of this.
AZALEA 'Tebotan'
AZALEA ‘Tebotan’
AZALEA 'Blushing Bride'
AZALEA ‘Blushing Bride’
RHODODENDRON broughtonii
RHODODENDRON broughtonii
RHODODENDRON broughtonii 02
RHODODENDRON broughtonii

Good to see some of our tissue culture grown plants of long standing old favourites doing well.  Rhododendron broughtonii has a spreading creeping habit and has sat happily and unnoticed towards Green Gate for decades.  Now thanks to the work at Rosemoor by Ros Smith we have saved this hybrid for posterity and have several new clumps getting going.On our travels we bump into three more rather new and startling magnolias in full flower; two for the very first time.

MAGNOLIA 'Swedish Star'
MAGNOLIA ‘Swedish Star’
Magnolia 'Swedish Star'
Magnolia ‘Swedish Star’
MAGNOLIA 'Swedish Star' 02
MAGNOLIA ‘Swedish Star’

Magnolia ‘Swedish Star’ looks from a distance to be a ‘Yellow Bird’ but, on closer inspection, it is a really good new addition to the yellows collection.  Time, yet again, to check the reference books.  It is greenish yellow with a good shape, opening flattish.

MAGNOLIA 'Woodsman' x 'Pink Surprise' 02
MAGNOLIA ‘Woodsman’ x ‘Pink Surprise’
MAGNOLIA 'Woodsman' x 'Pink Surprise'
MAGNOLIA ‘Woodsman’ x ‘Pink Surprise’

Magnolia ‘Woodsman’ x ‘Pink Surprise’ (unnamed hybrid).  This horror is a surprise alright and gets my vote as the most insipid and revolting ‘new’ magnolia colour yet.  You would not inflict it even on your mother-in-law.  Clearly an American product presumably as seed via the Magnolia Society International.

MAGNOLIA 'Green Bee' 02
MAGNOLIA ‘Green Bee’
MAGNOLIA 'Green Bee'
MAGNOLIA ‘Green Bee’

Magnolia ‘Green Bee’ is another Belgian from Philippe de Spoelberch which is good but not perhaps quite as good as ‘Lois’ or ‘Daphne’.  The latter is not even showing colour here yet but Lois will merit the camera in a couple of days.  ‘Green Bee’ does get into the current top 10 yellows but not quite the top 5.  However it may yet improve like ‘Yellow Lantern’.

1984 – FJW
HRH came and a happy day was had by all.

1982 – FJW
CHW married Emma Richey at Woodstock – Mag nitida in evidence.

1973 – FJW
Big leafed Rhodo’s very bad – only 4 Sinogrande flowered – decorum x ‘Humming Bird’ flowering at 4 years (1968 cross) – 4 out of 18 plants – interesting to see them next year.

1945 – CW
Swallow seen.

1934 – JCW
Fairly free from frost or storms so far. No sign of a maddeni hybrid anywhere. I saw Mag mollicomata flowering for the first time. It is not quite open.

1928 – JCW
Truro Show. Much has been broken by wind and frost. A fair show but being well arranged it seemed very good to most there. Have had no Maddeni’s since about Christmas. Auklandii now opening.

1913 – JCW
The Cherries in the shooting ride at about their best (additional note: all but one died in 1925 and the same sort of thing in the Drive). The Auklandii x Arboreum going back, the Broughtonii are good, particularly in the Beech Walk. Primroses wild very good.

1908 – JCW
Heavy snow. Marvels are good, and a hard frost which cut the Auklandiis a good bit.

1907 – JCW
Altaclarence seedling opening. Tropaoleum tricolor is well out. One R auklandii opening.

1899 – JCW
Found Tropaoelum tricolor open.

1898 – JCW
Saw the first Azalea altaclarence open.

One thought on “24th April

  1. Wonderful initiative this diary! Congratulations for taking up the effort. I wonder whether Swedish Star = Lemon Star. We’ve selected Lemon Star (a acuminata x ‘Norman Gold’ hybrid) after a Swedish group visiting the arboretum could not suppress their enthusiasm for this plant. Hence Swedish Star as a working name but registered as ‘Lemon Star’. See pictures on http://www.arboretumwespelaar.be/EN/Our_selections/Magnolia_Lemon_Star/
    ‘Green Bee’ is a deep yellow selection, but only for those who like floppy flowers! Koen

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