24th April

FJ Williams Profile Picture
FJW 1955-2007
CH Williams Profile Picture
CHW 2015-
JC Williams Profile Picture
JCW 1897-1939
C Williams Profile Picture
CW 1940-1955

2020 – CHW

I started writing these diary commends about COVID-19 as a personal way of trying to see and think through the reality of what was actually happening to the country and why. While I have read some newspapers and listened to the BBC bleating I have not paid any heed online to the conspiracy theorists or those who have more medical knowledge and knowledge of how the NHS and the mainstream media actually works.

One or two of those who have read my diary have put me in touch with Iain Davis’ paper on the “Coronavirus Lockdown and What You Are Not Being Told”.

Everyone who thinks about the collapse of our economy and why this has come about should read his two part article. You can do so here. Certainly it has elements of ‘conspiracy theory’ but is it really all ‘fake’ news? Decide for yourself!

Basically we have taken a political decision to shut down the country which was driven by the mainstream media acting in support of dubious science. The chief government scientific advisor, Professor Ferguson, is also in the pay of the pharmaceutical companies and the World Health Organisation which is half funded by Big Pharma. All have dubious track records with previous disease outbreaks.

The tidal wave of media demands for every country to lock down to save lives / the NHS etc was impossible for any democratic government not to accede to, despite Boris’ reluctance. Panic led fear as I have said often enough here (Sweden the exception).

But the NHS is NOT in crisis or even faintly overstretched. Far less people are actually dying of corona (rather than something else) than the figures purport to show. Death rates are about the same as a bad case of flu as the Spectator article surmised a month ago. They were right!

So why does the lockdown stay in place? Mainstream media hysteria has enabled the government to maintain lockdown unchallenged without any awkward ‘facts’ getting in the way.

We have dictatorship by default and a clear pathway for serious socialism when the economic disaster becomes the government’s fault (either way of course).

So who benefits from this surge to wreck our economy on the basis of false science? China? Big Pharma? Certainly not democracy and the British way of life as the BBC gleefully engage in its dismemberment.

Reading The Spectator and Private Eye this week even they dare not try to tell the objective truth because, presumably, they too are part of the mainstream media and dare not jump the fence.

An azalea in Rookery ‘sporting’ two very different colours. This is one of the still few left in the Rookery of the Wilson 50 collection. No idea of the name.

An odd clump of daffodils still out in late April. They were hidden prior to Jaimie’s tidying up here.

The Caerhays bred Rhododendron ‘Nancor’ just out.

Rhododendron ‘Nancor’
Rhododendron ‘Nancor’
Rhododendron ‘Nancor’
Rhododendron ‘Nancor’
Staphylea trifoliata is now a small tree and full out.
Staphylea trifoliata
Staphylea trifoliata
Staphylea trifoliata
Staphylea trifoliata
Staphylea trifoliata
Staphylea trifoliata
Azalea ‘Greenway’ fronting a Cornus kousa ‘Madame Butterfly’ which is just starting to show.
Azalea ‘Greenway’
Azalea ‘Greenway’
Another first time flowering Magnolia ‘Dark Bird’ is completely new. 2017 planted and just one flower with leaves appearing.
Magnolia ‘Dark Bird’
Magnolia ‘Dark Bird’
This is a surprise. A really fantastic yellow magnolia on Burns Bank. Larger and darker yellow flowers (with some green) than ‘Limelight’ or ‘Yellow Lantern’ and a fortnight later. No label and not on the plans but it has been here 15 or more years. Not quite ‘Judy Zuk’ but closer to ‘Anilou’ or ‘Mister Yellowjacket’? I need to go and look at some other possibilities. [I found the answer: it is ‘Sundance’!]
yellow magnolia
yellow magnolia
yellow magnolia
yellow magnolia
yellow magnolia
yellow magnolia
yellow magnolia
yellow magnolia
A big bonfire of an old dead yew and laurel hedge trimming above the Green Gate. Plenty of room here now for an azalea planting next spring.
bonfire
bonfire
One of many clumps of Rhododendron ‘Nancor’ – some full out like this.
Rhododendron ‘Nancor’
Rhododendron ‘Nancor’
Rhododendron ‘Nancor’
Rhododendron ‘Nancor’
Rhododendron floccigeum has always been one of my favourite species. These were tissue cultured plants originally from Ross Smith at Duchy College.
Rhododendron floccigeum
Rhododendron floccigeum
Rhododendron floccigeum
Rhododendron floccigeum
Rhododendron floccigeum
Rhododendron floccigeum
Rhododendron ‘Beauty of Littleworth’. We must layer this plant!
Rhododendron ‘Beauty of Littleworth’
Rhododendron ‘Beauty of Littleworth’
Rhododendron ‘Beauty of Littleworth’
Rhododendron ‘Beauty of Littleworth’
Rhododendron ‘Hotei’ now full out.
Rhododendron ‘Hotei’
Rhododendron ‘Hotei’
Rhododendron tanastyllum with one flower. Not looking well and the other two in this clump of three are worse. Wind chill and leaves blown off over winter despite a sheltered spot.
Rhododendron tanastyllum
Rhododendron tanastyllum
Azaleodendron ‘Harditzer Beauty’ is a short lived small thing. Here nearly on its last legs after 30 years or so.
Azaleodendron ‘Harditzer Beauty’
Azaleodendron ‘Harditzer Beauty’
Azaleodendron ‘Harditzer Beauty’
Azaleodendron ‘Harditzer Beauty’
Magnolia sieboldii ‘Mishico Renge’ out in flower already. A month early at least.
Magnolia sieboldii ‘Mishico Renge’
Magnolia sieboldii ‘Mishico Renge’
Magnolia sieboldii ‘Mishico Renge’
Magnolia sieboldii ‘Mishico Renge’
Paulownia tomentosa ‘Lilacina’ looking fantastic against the blue sky. 40-50ft tall now in less than half that number of years.
Paulownia tomentosa ‘Lilacina’
Paulownia tomentosa ‘Lilacina’
Paulownia tomentosa ‘Lilacina’
Paulownia tomentosa ‘Lilacina’
Sally Hayward has very kindly been transcribing handwritten records of plants gifted to Caerhays and by Caerhays to others. Gifted not sold or bought in the old fashioned way between gardeners. The records go back to my great grandfather’s time.
Here are a couple of discoveries by Sally about gifts of cuttings by Caerhays in the 1960s to Japan and America. These would be absolutely prohibited today.From: Sally Hayward
Sent: 22 April 2020 12:16
To: Charles Williams PA
Subject: An update on my transcription work
[…]
Yesterday I reached the year 1965. Two adjacent entries in particular were so interesting that I thought I would share them with you. On 25 August 1965 3 cuttings each of Rhododendron calophytum, R. sutchuenense, R. orbiculare, R. falconeri and R. arboreum (white) were sent to ‘Milton Walker USA’. This small entry in the book led me on to the story of Dr Milton Walker, who I am sure you already know was one of the founding fathers of the Rhododendron Species Foundation in America. Their aim was to locate and acquire superior forms of rhododendron species available at that time with the goal of preserving the best of the species, and to this end, Dr Walker visited several English and Scottish gardens, presumably Caerhays amongst them. The collection was originally grown on at his estate in Pleasant Hill, Oregon. This aspiration so fits in with our current drive to locate all of our three genera growing in the UK today, to try to locate the rare and unusual for conservation. I intend to follow up with Steve Hootman to find out if there are any records of these cuttings arriving in the US and, indeed, if plants from them still grow on at the current location of the Rhododendron Species Foundation in Federal Way, Washington.
The next entry in Philip’s book shows that, on the same day, 4 cuttings each of R. wilsonae, R. championae, R. stamineum and R. stenaulum were dispatched to Koichiro Wada, Japan! Another great name in the nursery world. I wonder how successful they were at raising them and whether there are plants surviving in Japan today.
[…]
From: Sally Hayward
Sent: 28 April 2020 10:32
To: Charles Williams PA
Subject: An update from Steve Hootman, Rhododendron Species Foundation
Dear Charles
I have heard back from Steve Hootman. He was very interested to hear about the entry in Philip’s book, and writes:
‘I have just checked our database and while I do see that all of those species were brought in by Walker and were accessioned into the collection, only the orbiculare (our 1965/350) and the sutchuenense (our 1965/348) are still alive and flourishing here.’
I am really pleased to have made the connection, and even more so, that two out of the four are still alive and thriving today. Do you think you still have the host plants at Caerhays, and if so, do you know their provenance?
A wet day here today, so I will be progressing further with Philip’s book.
Best wishes
Sally

From: Charles Williams PA
Sent: 29 April 2020 09:42
To: ‘Sally Hayward’
Subject: RE: An update from Steve Hootman, Rhododendron Species Foundation
Dear Sally
Rhododendron orbiculare was an original Wilson introduction from his last expedition in 1932. The old plant died about 15 years ago and the seedlings which we have raised are a rather poor substitute for the original with much smaller leaves.
The Rhododendron falconeri and arboreum (white) are still growing here but the arboreum is coming to the end of its life.
The original calophytum died years ago but we did propagate it by layering it and have several plants left.
There are quite a few original clumps of Rhododendron sutchuenense dotted about with varying colours so I guess that one is a survivor too.
Charles

2019 – CHW
The heatwave continues and the scented Rhododendrons smother the garden in their
scent.Camellia ‘Tricolor’ full out by the side door. One of the very last camellias to perform.
Camellia ‘Tricolor’
Camellia ‘Tricolor’
Camellia ‘Tricolor’
Camellia ‘Tricolor’
Increasingly this looks like our only plant of Spiraea bolenderi [pics for article] although
I need to wait a few more days to be certain.
Spiraea bolenderi
Spiraea bolenderi
Spiraea bolenderi
Spiraea bolenderi
Staphylea colchica now full out.
Staphylea colchica
Staphylea colchica
Staphylea colchica
Staphylea colchica
Serena and Neil with a large clump of the scented Rhododendron ‘Harry Tagg’. You can
hardly see a leaf.
Rhododendron ‘Harry Tagg’
Rhododendron ‘Harry Tagg’
Rhododendron ‘Harry Tagg’
Rhododendron ‘Harry Tagg’
Rhododendron ‘Fragrantissimum’ just coming out. Rather more pink in the flower than
in ‘Harry Tagg’ although the two are quite similar.
Rhododendron ‘Fragrantissimum’
Rhododendron ‘Fragrantissimum’
Rhododendron ‘Fragrantissimum’
Rhododendron ‘Fragrantissimum’
Rhododendron ‘Michael’s Pride just coming out. This is another one which should have
been perfect for Chelsea.
Rhododendron ‘Michael’s Pride
Rhododendron ‘Michael’s Pride
Rhododendron ‘Michael’s Pride
Rhododendron ‘Michael’s Pride
Rhododendron ‘Princess Alice’ nearly over by the main quarry. A much dwarfer scented
variety
Rhododendron ‘Princess Alice’
Rhododendron ‘Princess Alice’
Rhododendron ‘Princess Alice’
Rhododendron ‘Princess Alice’
Rhododendron ‘Princess Alice’
Rhododendron ‘Princess Alice’

2018 – CHW
Last week’s heatwave while we were away in Ireland has certainly brought the rhodos rushing out but with a short flowering span in the sudden heat.Rhododendron valentinianum on Burns Bank.
Rhododendron valentinianum
Rhododendron valentinianum
Rhododendron valentinianum
Rhododendron valentinianum
Rhododendron edgeworthii x leucaspis scenting the air for 50 yards. It will be over sadly in a couple more days.
Rhododendron edgeworthii x leucaspis
Rhododendron edgeworthii x leucaspis
Rhododendron edgeworthii x leucaspis
Rhododendron edgeworthii x leucaspis
Rhododendron ‘Princess Alice’ just out by the main quarry. Still plenty of pink in the flowers.
Rhododendron ‘Princess Alice’
Rhododendron ‘Princess Alice’
Rhododendron ‘Princess Alice’
Rhododendron ‘Princess Alice’

Despite what the pundits were saying a month ago it has turned into a great year for the big leaf rhodos. Jaimie won the Rothschild cup at Rosemoor last Saturday for the best exhibit of six rhodo species using big leaf species only.

I think this is the most gorgeous colour of any but it is probably a seedling rather than a species. It is close to Rhododendron hodgsonii some say. Others say Rhododendron kesangiae (we exhibit as a kesangiae seedling). The jury is out but, if you like purple, this is fantastic!

Rhododendron kesangiae
Rhododendron kesangiae
Rhododendron kesangiae
Rhododendron kesangiae
Rhododendron kesangiae
Rhododendron kesangiae
This we think is Rhododendron protistum var giganteum. You can see here in flower multiple trusses how the flowers fade quickly once open. A common feature of the big leaf species.
Rhododendron protistum var giganteum
Rhododendron protistum var giganteum
Rhododendron protistum var giganteum
Rhododendron protistum var giganteum
Rhododendron protistum var giganteum
Rhododendron protistum var giganteum
Rhododendron protistum var giganteum
Rhododendron protistum var giganteum
Rhododendron protistum var giganteum
Rhododendron protistum var giganteum
Rhododendron protistum var giganteum
Rhododendron protistum var giganteum
This seems closest to Rhododendron rothschildii but I might have muddled it with a nearby Rhododendron coriaceum. Need to take the Robinson rhodo book and the planting plans on these walks about. Difficult however when carrying camera and gun with seven dogs.
Rhododendron rothschildii
Rhododendron rothschildii
Rhododendron rothschildii
Rhododendron rothschildii
Rhododendron rothschildii
Rhododendron rothschildii
Rhododendron rothschildii
Rhododendron rothschildii
My grandfather’s Rhododendron ‘May Day’ is just out and a very much darker colour than Rhododendron ‘Elizabeth’ which may be more popular and widely grown today.
Rhododendron ‘May Day’
Rhododendron ‘May Day’
Rhododendron ‘May Day’
Rhododendron ‘May Day’
Azalea ‘Hinomayo’ is now full out. A month later than usual although I did show a few odd flowers appearing in February before the snow.
Azalea ‘Hinomayo’
Azalea ‘Hinomayo’
I rather like these pink bluebells since I planted them here and there nearly 50 years ago when this bed was my fuchsia collection. Several still survive. No doubt the National Trust would decry them as ‘non native’ but they do not have a ‘Spanish’ shape to me!
pink bluebells
pink bluebells

2017 – CHW

Now on to Llanover Court garden.

Darmeria peltata as a large clump.

Darmeria peltata
Darmeria peltata
An unusual iris growing wild in grass.
unusual iris
unusual iris

A fine mature plant of Lithocarpus henryi with similar bark and trunk to the Rosemoor plant but rather different leaves.

Lithocarpus henryi
Lithocarpus henryi
Lithocarpus henryi
Lithocarpus henryi

Quercus pontica – an elderly tree with several main stems.

Quercus pontica
Quercus pontica

Sorbus scalaris with leaves and flower forming.

Sorbus scalaris
Sorbus scalaris
Sorbus scalaris
Sorbus scalaris

Viburnum cylindricum with many berries still from last autumn. Not a species we grow but quite similar to Viburnum cinnamomifolium and Viburnum odoratissiumum in some ways.

Viburnum cylindricum
Viburnum cylindricum
Viburnum cylindricum
Viburnum cylindricum

An unknown cotoneaster full of berries too.

unknown cotoneaster
unknown cotoneaster
unknown cotoneaster
unknown cotoneaster

I think this is Chionanthus virginicus.

Chionanthus virginicus.
Chionanthus virginicus.
Chionanthus virginicus.
Chionanthus virginicus.
Chionanthus virginicus.
Chionanthus virginicus.

Koelreuteria paniculata with attractive new growth.

Koelreuteria paniculata
Koelreuteria paniculata
Koelreuteria paniculata
Koelreuteria paniculata

Quercus cadicans after a mild winter but with new growth forming.

Quercus cadicans
Quercus cadicans
Quercus cadicans
Quercus cadicans

Magnolia wilsonii early into flower in a mature tree.

Magnolia wilsonii
Magnolia wilsonii

Malus ‘Comtessa de Paris’ was especially fine.

Malus ‘Comtessa de Paris’
Malus ‘Comtessa de Paris’
Malus ‘Comtessa de Paris’
Malus ‘Comtessa de Paris’

An unidentified syringa species.

unidentified syringa species.
unidentified syringa species.
unidentified syringa species.
unidentified syringa species.

Wisteria ‘Pink Ice’ perhaps?

Wisteria ‘Pink Ice’ ?
Wisteria ‘Pink Ice’ ?
Wisteria ‘Pink Ice’ ?
Wisteria ‘Pink Ice’ ?

Wisteria venista ‘Shiro-kapitan’ just coming out.

Wisteria venista ‘Shiro-kapitan’
Wisteria venista ‘Shiro-kapitan’
Wisteria venista ‘Shiro-kapitan’
Wisteria venista ‘Shiro-kapitan’

Cydonia oblonga – as good a tree as I have seen with copious flower and attractive bark.

Cydonia oblonga
Cydonia oblonga
Cydonia oblonga
Cydonia oblonga
Cydonia oblonga
Cydonia oblonga
Cydonia oblonga
Cydonia oblonga

Dicentra ‘Valentine’ was tall growing and impressively dark in colour. Well worth growing.

Dicentra ‘Valentine’
Dicentra ‘Valentine’
Dicentra ‘Valentine’
Dicentra ‘Valentine’

Acer platanoides ‘Crimson King’ in full flower beside the Crawshay’s church.

Acer platanoides ‘Crimson King’
Acer platanoides ‘Crimson King’

Back to Llanfair Court for the grand opening of the new rockery border.

Actinidia kolomitka covering a wall.

Actinidia kolomitka
Actinidia kolomitka
Actinidia kolomitka
Actinidia kolomitka

Cutting the ribbon with Terence, Lizzie and Thomas. Big speech.

Cutting the ribbon
Cutting the ribbon
Cutting the ribbon
Cutting the ribbon
Cutting the ribbon
Cutting the ribbon
Cutting the ribbon
Cutting the ribbon
Cutting the ribbon
Cutting the ribbon
Cutting the ribbon
Cutting the ribbon

More ‘work in progress’!

‘work in progress’!
‘work in progress’!

Rhododendron groenlandicum in the new border.

Rhododendron groenlandicum
Rhododendron groenlandicum
Rhododendron groenlandicum
Rhododendron groenlandicum

Cercis siliquastrum about to open in what has become a huge spreading tree in 20 years.

Cercis siliquastrum
Cercis siliquastrum
Cercis siliquastrum
Cercis siliquastrum
Cercis siliquastrum
Cercis siliquastrum
Cercis siliquastrum
Cercis siliquastrum
Cercis siliquastrum
Cercis siliquastrum
Cercis siliquastrum
Cercis siliquastrum

Cercis chinensis ‘Avondale’ growing out of a holly hedge.

Cercis chinensis ‘Avondale’
Cercis chinensis ‘Avondale’
Cercis chinensis ‘Avondale’
Cercis chinensis ‘Avondale’

Then on to the Sugar Loaf Mountain where the Chenevix-Trenches have started a garden sunk deep in a gorge. The trees were planted 30 years ago by Rosemary Verey. Now rhododendrons are the name of the game.

Prunus serrula with tiny white flowers with the foliage. I had not seen this in flower before and will not be rushing!

Prunus serrula
Prunus serrula
Prunus serrula
Prunus serrula

A 30 year old clump of Picea omorika.

Picea omorika
Picea omorika

The summer house surrounded by young Japanese acers.

The Summer House
The Summer House

Picea breweriana doing well.

Picea breweriana
Picea breweriana
Picea breweriana
Picea breweriana
Picea breweriana
Picea breweriana

Rhododendron ‘Boddaertianum’ pinkish in bud, opening pale mauve-white.

Rhododendron ‘Boddaertianum’
Rhododendron ‘Boddaertianum’

The house from across the valley.

Llanover Court
Llanover Court

A fine clump of Euphorbia ‘Fireglow’ by the house.

Euphorbia ‘Fireglow’
Euphorbia ‘Fireglow’

As much flower as you could possibly get on the usually rather dull culinary bay tree (Laurus nobilis).

Laurus nobilis
Laurus nobilis
Laurus nobilis
Laurus nobilis
Laurus nobilis
Laurus nobilis

2016 – CHW

Sophora japonica ‘Sun King’ is full out at the greenhouse. We planted out three of these by the playhouse four to five years ago and all three are now dead from cold although one lasted a couple of years more than the others. No point really in planting this one out.

Sophora japonica ‘Sun King’
Sophora japonica ‘Sun King’
Two plants of Magnolia ‘Holland Red’ (liliiflora nigra hybrid) have flowers at the greenhouse. We had planted this out before but lost it. A smallish shrub for a good place and a late flowerer.
Magnolia ‘Holland Red’
Magnolia ‘Holland Red’
Magnolia ‘Holland Red’
Magnolia ‘Holland Red’
A group of azaleas bought at the Landriana flower show (south of Rome) below the greenhouse steps are nicely out. No idea of the proper names but they are mainly doubles. Red and pinkish-red forms are the best today. We promised the Italian grower that we would not propagate or sell these and have not! The reddish one I discover is ‘Salmon Pink Cushion’ and the pinker one is ‘Gerards Salmon’. Well worth propagating now!
Azalea ‘Salmon Pink Cushion’
Azalea ‘Salmon Pink Cushion’
Azalea ‘Salmon Pink Cushion’
Azalea ‘Salmon Pink Cushion’
Azalea ‘Gerards Salmon’
Azalea ‘Gerards Salmon’
Azalea ‘Gerards Salmon’
Azalea ‘Gerards Salmon’
Another wild collected Magnolia cylindrica is equally impressive nearby. The same as the one below the Magnolia x veitchii.
Magnolia cylindrica
Magnolia cylindrica
Magnolia cylindrica
Magnolia cylindrica
Stachyurus praecox ‘Magpie’ has attractive yellow and green variegated foliage but the flower is not bad today in the sunlight. A good spray of this on the Rosemoor show bench yesterday.
Stachyurus praecox ‘Magpie’
Stachyurus praecox ‘Magpie’
Stachyurus praecox ‘Magpie’
Stachyurus praecox ‘Magpie’
Stachyurus praecox ‘Magpie’
Stachyurus praecox ‘Magpie’
Azalea stenopetalum ‘Linearifolium’ is quite variable as to colour and the divisions in the flower. This one is in the car park and was originally from Italy. So we did propagate it after all! Different from the much older plants in the rockery and perhaps nicer?
Azalea stenopetalum ‘Linearifolium’
Azalea stenopetalum ‘Linearifolium’
Azalea stenopetalum ‘Linearifolium’
Azalea stenopetalum ‘Linearifolium’
2015 – CHW
I trip around the garden with Asia to help identify the scented rhododendrons currently in flower from which cuttings will need to be taken in four to six weeks when still soft (fragrantissimum, formosum, Princess Alice, Lady Alice Fitzwilliam, Berts Own, HarryTagg, Anne Teese, ciliicalyx, Countess of Haddington, Michaels Pride etc).
Outside the backyard on the bank are two rather different evergreen azaleas, ‘Tebotan’ and ‘Blushing Bride’.  The latter resulted from one of those Christmas time potted azaleas unusually proving to be a half decent garden plant.  Tebotan, as I remember it years ago, was a smaller bush with more delicate flowers so I may yet stand corrected on the naming of this.
AZALEA 'Tebotan'
AZALEA ‘Tebotan’
AZALEA 'Blushing Bride'
AZALEA ‘Blushing Bride’
RHODODENDRON broughtonii
RHODODENDRON broughtonii
RHODODENDRON broughtonii 02
RHODODENDRON broughtonii

Good to see some of our tissue culture grown plants of long standing old favourites doing well.  Rhododendron broughtonii has a spreading creeping habit and has sat happily and unnoticed towards Green Gate for decades.  Now thanks to the work at Rosemoor by Ros Smith we have saved this hybrid for posterity and have several new clumps getting going.On our travels we bump into three more rather new and startling magnolias in full flower; two for the very first time.

MAGNOLIA 'Swedish Star'
MAGNOLIA ‘Swedish Star’
Magnolia 'Swedish Star'
Magnolia ‘Swedish Star’
MAGNOLIA 'Swedish Star' 02
MAGNOLIA ‘Swedish Star’

Magnolia ‘Swedish Star’ looks from a distance to be a ‘Yellow Bird’ but, on closer inspection, it is a really good new addition to the yellows collection.  Time, yet again, to check the reference books.  It is greenish yellow with a good shape, opening flattish.

MAGNOLIA 'Woodsman' x 'Pink Surprise' 02
MAGNOLIA ‘Woodsman’ x ‘Pink Surprise’
MAGNOLIA 'Woodsman' x 'Pink Surprise'
MAGNOLIA ‘Woodsman’ x ‘Pink Surprise’

Magnolia ‘Woodsman’ x ‘Pink Surprise’ (unnamed hybrid).  This horror is a surprise alright and gets my vote as the most insipid and revolting ‘new’ magnolia colour yet.  You would not inflict it even on your mother-in-law.  Clearly an American product presumably as seed via the Magnolia Society International.

MAGNOLIA 'Green Bee' 02
MAGNOLIA ‘Green Bee’
MAGNOLIA 'Green Bee'
MAGNOLIA ‘Green Bee’

Magnolia ‘Green Bee’ is another Belgian from Philippe de Spoelberch which is good but not perhaps quite as good as ‘Lois’ or ‘Daphne’.  The latter is not even showing colour here yet but Lois will merit the camera in a couple of days.  ‘Green Bee’ does get into the current top 10 yellows but not quite the top 5.  However it may yet improve like ‘Yellow Lantern’.

1984 – FJW
HRH came and a happy day was had by all.

1982 – FJW
CHW married Emma Richey at Woodstock – Mag nitida in evidence.

1973 – FJW
Big leafed Rhodo’s very bad – only 4 Sinogrande flowered – decorum x ‘Humming Bird’ flowering at 4 years (1968 cross) – 4 out of 18 plants – interesting to see them next year.

1945 – CW
Swallow seen.

1934 – JCW
Fairly free from frost or storms so far. No sign of a maddeni hybrid anywhere. I saw Mag mollicomata flowering for the first time. It is not quite open.

1928 – JCW
Truro Show. Much has been broken by wind and frost. A fair show but being well arranged it seemed very good to most there. Have had no Maddeni’s since about Christmas. Auklandii now opening.

1913 – JCW
The Cherries in the shooting ride at about their best (additional note: all but one died in 1925 and the same sort of thing in the Drive). The Auklandii x Arboreum going back, the Broughtonii are good, particularly in the Beech Walk. Primroses wild very good.

1908 – JCW
Heavy snow. Marvels are good, and a hard frost which cut the Auklandiis a good bit.

1907 – JCW
Altaclarence seedling opening. Tropaoleum tricolor is well out. One R auklandii opening.

1899 – JCW
Found Tropaoelum tricolor open.

1898 – JCW
Saw the first Azalea altaclarence open.

One thought on “24th April

  1. Wonderful initiative this diary! Congratulations for taking up the effort. I wonder whether Swedish Star = Lemon Star. We’ve selected Lemon Star (a acuminata x ‘Norman Gold’ hybrid) after a Swedish group visiting the arboretum could not suppress their enthusiasm for this plant. Hence Swedish Star as a working name but registered as ‘Lemon Star’. See pictures on http://www.arboretumwespelaar.be/EN/Our_selections/Magnolia_Lemon_Star/
    ‘Green Bee’ is a deep yellow selection, but only for those who like floppy flowers! Koen

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