26th August

FJ Williams Profile Picture
FJW 1955-2007
CH Williams Profile Picture
CHW 2015-
JC Williams Profile Picture
JCW 1897-1939
C Williams Profile Picture
CW 1940-1955

2018 – CHW

A few days ago I suddenly saw what I thought was a Persea japonica tree flowering away as a Schima. On closer inspection this 15ft tree is labelled as P. japonica (twice) which is clearly incorrect.

Schima species are notoriously difficult to identify and name properly even when in flower.

To confuse matters the planting records show for this area a 1998 planting of Schima liukuiensis from Chris Chester at Rosemoor and given to us in 1997. There is also a record of a 2009 planting of Schima wallichii about where the plant is labelled P. japonica.

On the left is a twig from the real and true Persea japonica and one from the schima (labelled P. japonica) on the right.

On the left
On the left
This is a flower bud on the mislabelled plant and some leaves. The inflorescence is still too high up to photograph properly.
flower bud
flower bud
flower bud
flower bud
This is the plant I had thought might well be Schima wallichii but, in fact, it is identical to our old original Schima khasiana. Neither are quite out in flower and the buds are not quite showing any white yet.
Schima khasiana
Schima khasiana
Here is (left to right) P. japonica, Schima ‘?’ and Schima (probably) khasiana:
All three side by side
All three side by side
Persea japonica
Persea japonica
Schima?
Schima?
Schima khasiana
Schima khasiana
And the same again with the leaves turned over:
Persea japonica
Persea japonica
Schima?
Schima?
Schima khasiana
Schima khasiana

The problem is that the Schima (probably) khasiana has been in place since at least 1998 and the schima on the planting plan as wallichii is much younger and probably dates from 2009.

Is it possible that the incorrectly named Persea japonica is in fact Schima liukuiensis? The only person who might enjoy this complex and dull subject (apart from me) is Tom Hudson. I thought Schima liukuiensis was not in any reference book that I have but, in the small print, I see it is now called Schima superba although the picture in ‘New Trees’ does not really match our plant.

The next step is to assemble all our schima in flower and photograph them. In theory we have S. khasiana, S. wallichii and S. argentea or that is what they were planted as anyway.

2017 – CHW
A trip to examine what is setting seed this year but I get distracted!

Hypericum lancasteri has grown massively since last year and is full of flower with more to come. We put in three plants together and there is already quite a clump.

Hypericum lancasteri
Hypericum lancasteri
Hypericum lancasteri
Hypericum lancasteri
Hypericum lancasteri
Hypericum lancasteri
Hydrangea paniculata ‘Vanille Fraise’ is turning colour where the sun catches this immature but impressive clump which is largely in shade. The close ups reveal how pink the bracts can get. The pure H. paniculata which we looked at earlier this week also goes pink in the sun. Is ‘Vanille Fraise’ really that different?
Hydrangea paniculata ‘Vanille Fraise’
Hydrangea paniculata ‘Vanille Fraise’
Hydrangea paniculata ‘Vanille Fraise’
Hydrangea paniculata ‘Vanille Fraise’
Hydrangea paniculata ‘Vanille Fraise’
Hydrangea paniculata ‘Vanille Fraise’
Hydrangea paniculata ‘Vanille Fraise’
Hydrangea paniculata ‘Vanille Fraise’
The suckers on Tetrapanax papyrifera ‘Rex’ have grown apace in the last two months and the largest is nearly as tall as the original and now a dead stalk. One sucker is at least three yards from the original plant.
Tetrapanax papyrifera ‘Rex’
Tetrapanax papyrifera ‘Rex’
Tetrapanax papyrifera ‘Rex’
Tetrapanax papyrifera ‘Rex’
Magnolia globosa has three, as yet unripe, seed pods. Larger than last year’s and important to collect in a couple of months.
Magnolia globosa
Magnolia globosa
Styrax hookeri has many large seeds already. Ripe in four to six weeks I suspect?
Styrax hookeri
Styrax hookeri
Styrax hookeri
Styrax hookeri
Gevuina avellana is plastered in flower from top to bottom of this 30ft plus clump. Are there male and female flowers? Yes I think this shows this. No sign of any of the black nuts or seeds which we saw this time last year on this ‘Chilean nut tree’ or ‘Chilean hazel’.
Gevuina avellana
Gevuina avellana
Gevuina avellana
Gevuina avellana
Gevuina avellana
Gevuina avellana
Gevuina avellana
Gevuina avellana
Gevuina avellana
Gevuina avellana

2016 – CHW (photos to follow)
It has got to be a good summer when you can find a stick insect this size in the nursery! Huge! I wonder what stick insects eat?Updated by Julie at Forgecom – stick insects love privet, also rose and hazel leaves.2015 – CHW
Why is Hydrangea ‘Blue Wave’ at its absolute best when all the other hydrangea clumps on the drive are starting to fade in colour or have gone over altogether?
Hydrangea ‘Blue Wave’
Hydrangea ‘Blue Wave’
Hydrangea ‘Blue Wave’
Hydrangea ‘Blue Wave’
Hydrangea ‘Blue Wave’
Hydrangea ‘Blue Wave’

1992 – FJW
All corn in – poor harvest. Peas west, then Barley – wheat average.

1990 – FJW
All corn in – good yield but prices on low side. Caerhays not as badly hit by dry summer as some areas close to sea fog.

1967 – FJW
Terrace not cut for year – Camellia with one flower in the Werrens.

1966 – FJW
All corn in and only one field to bale – marvellous yield.

1916 – JCW
Just as in 1914 for flower, several mountain rhodo’s show flowers.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*