28th August

FJ Williams Profile Picture
FJW 1955-2007
CH Williams Profile Picture
CHW 2015-
JC Williams Profile Picture
JCW 1897-1939
C Williams Profile Picture
CW 1940-1955

2019 – CHW

A clump of Rhododendron ‘Polar Bear’ still happily in flower in full shade on Hovel Cart Road. It will certainly make it into September.

Rhododendron ‘Polar Bear’
Rhododendron ‘Polar Bear’
Rhododendron ‘Polar Bear’
Rhododendron ‘Polar Bear’
I need to confirm with Asia the identity of this magnolia above Burns Bank. It may be a named form of M. cylindrica? Anyway I have never seen such large globular seed pods on a magnolia before. Very unusual and very spectacular. [It is Magnolia ‘Sunrise’ planted in 2007 which is now renamed as Magnolia cylindrica ‘Lv Xing’.]
magnolia above Burns Bank
magnolia above Burns Bank
magnolia above Burns Bank
magnolia above Burns Bank
First berries for Asia to collect from Crataegus laevigata ‘Crimson Cloud’ in the Isla Rose Plantation which was planted 18 months ago.
Crataegus laevigata ‘Crimson Cloud’
Crataegus laevigata ‘Crimson Cloud’
Acer rufinerve ‘Erythrocladum’ turning a lovely yellow already which contrasts well with its yellow-green snake bark.
Acer rufinerve ‘Erythrocladum’
Acer rufinerve ‘Erythrocladum’
Acer rufinerve ‘Erythrocladum’
Acer rufinerve ‘Erythrocladum’
Acer rufinerve ‘Erythrocladum’
Acer rufinerve ‘Erythrocladum’
The enormous seed heads on Lithocarpus pachyphyllus grow larger and heavier day by day. This year a couple are at head height. Perhaps only a few acorns in each seed head will be large enough to be capable of germination but Asia has 20+ seedlings from seed gathered two years ago. Can one guess at the current weight of the seed head? Four to five pounds I guess?
Lithocarpus pachyphyllus
Lithocarpus pachyphyllus
Lithocarpus pachyphyllus
Lithocarpus pachyphyllus
The flower heads on Hydrangea seemanii have gone a crisp darkish brown and sit attractively on this vigorous evergreen creeper growing over the arch.
Hydrangea seemanii
Hydrangea seemanii
Hydrangea seemanii
Hydrangea seemanii
Hydrangea seemanii
Hydrangea seemanii

2018 – CHW
A trip around the garden with Ned Lomax, the head gardener from Glendurgan. Aralia vietnamensis has shot again vigorously from the base after the ravages of The Beast killed back the main 12-15ft tall stem.

Aralia vietnamensis
Aralia vietnamensis
Aralia vietnamensis
Aralia vietnamensis
First flowers out on our oldest Schima khasiana (or so we think) which I believe is identical to the record tree clump of schima at Trewithen. Huge clusters of flower buds. I have to say that the high up flowers and flower clusters on Schima superba (see two days back) look much the same from a distance. Sadly no flower buds on our (supposed) Schima argentea this year. A few on (supposed) Schima wallichii but not out yet in more shade.
Schima khasiana
Schima khasiana
Schima khasiana
Schima khasiana

2017 – CHW
The dogs firmly tied on in the tent during the clay shoot. Dexter won the dog scurry (behind the spaniel).
dogs
dogs
Sheila Tidball and Peter Bickford-Smith collecting the clay shoot entries.
Sheila Tidball and Peter Bickford-Smith
Sheila Tidball and Peter Bickford-Smith
Schefflera myriocarpa is about to flower – three flower spikes showing.
Schefflera myriocarpa
Schefflera myriocarpa
Schefflera myriocarpa
Schefflera myriocarpa
Schefflera pauciflora (another wild collected form) also has setting seeds.
Schefflera pauciflora
Schefflera pauciflora
Schefflera pauciflora
Schefflera pauciflora
We have managed to keep the roe deer off this young Meliosma veitchiorum. Last year’s plantings were all munched and leafless. Why do deer only select the rarest plants to kill?
Meliosma veitchiorum
Meliosma veitchiorum
Secondary flowering on Rhododendron flavidum as normal.
Rhododendron flavidum
Rhododendron flavidum
A nice flower on Magnolia delavayi at the top of the garden. It never sets seeds and the floor is littered with empty seed pods.
Magnolia delavayi
Magnolia delavayi
Magnolia delavayi
Magnolia delavayi
Magnolia delavayi
Magnolia delavayi
Magnolia delavayi
Magnolia delavayi

2016 – CHW
The Hortensus hydrangeas may be past their prime on the drive but the paniculata varieties are absolutely at their best. Here Hydrangea paniculata ‘White Lace’, planted in 2009 as a five plant clump in the open / full sun, have made a massive display. The flower heads vary in size and shape from the top of the plant to the lower branches.
Hydrangea paniculata ‘White Lace’
Hydrangea paniculata ‘White Lace’
Hydrangea paniculata ‘White Lace’
Hydrangea paniculata ‘White Lace’
Hydrangea paniculata ‘White Lace’
Hydrangea paniculata ‘White Lace’
Hydrangea paniculata ‘Kyushu’ has smaller, more lacecap flowers and is more spreading but less tall overall. None the less the overall impact is just as good. In shade this can be a straggly grower with few flowers and we had a poor clump at Burncoose.
Hydrangea paniculata ‘Kyushu’
Hydrangea paniculata ‘Kyushu’
Hydrangea paniculata ‘Kyushu’
Hydrangea paniculata ‘Kyushu’
Hydrangea paniculata ‘Kyushu’
Hydrangea paniculata ‘Kyushu’
Hydrangea ‘Tricolor’ (some would say ‘Quadricolor’) is full out. This plant would do better in a less exposed and windy position where it would get less dieback. Nevertheless the blue lacecap flowers set against the yellow edged leaves is an excellent contrast.
Hydrangea ‘Tricolor’
Hydrangea ‘Tricolor’
Hydrangea ‘Tricolor’
Hydrangea ‘Tricolor’
Hydrangea ‘Tricolor’
Hydrangea ‘Tricolor’

2015 – CHW
In Kennel Close planting to catch up on early autumn:

Aesculus pavia ‘Splendens’ has lost its leaves but still the first conkers I have seen on our 2011 aesculus collection plantings.

Aesculus pavia ‘Splendens’
Aesculus pavia ‘Splendens’

Carpinus ranhanensis from Crug Farm has a delicate show of secondary new growth after the rain. Attractive foliage indeed.

Carpinus ranhanensis
Carpinus ranhanensis
Carpinus ranhanensis
Carpinus ranhanensis

1976 – FJW
Dryest year for 250 years we are told – slight rain in evening after a summer of drought – damage in garden very grave and is as bad as a v cold winter.

1970 – FJW
Corn and straw all harvested and collected. Yield light both in grain and straw. 60 acres in 5 days fine weather.

1961 – FJW
19 loads of humus around the wood. The whole of the Rockery, Auklandii Garden – 1550, Tetropeplum hybrid, Salutation, Donation, Iteophyllum, Saffron Queen, Diaprepes, Humming Bird, Crassum – 2 Camellias by tree ferns, one up by Crossbill – Aberconwayii, 3 Camellias, Mag and Auk hybrids, H cinnarbar hybrids, Golden Oriole 1 and 2, Trewithen Orange, Rhabdotum, Megacalyx Golden Oriole, G.Blandford, Caerhays.

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