11th January

FJ Williams Profile Picture
FJW 1955-2007
CH Williams Profile Picture
CHW 2015-
JC Williams Profile Picture
JCW 1897-1939
C Williams Profile Picture
CW 1940-1955

2018 – CHW

Lindera tonkinensis (FMWJ 13123) two years on from planting is clearly thriving and fully evergreen. Large lindera-like leaves.

Lindera tonkinensis
Lindera tonkinensis
Lindera tonkinensis
Lindera tonkinensis
First primroses creeping out all over the garden.
First primroses
First primroses
Last summer’s ripe seed pods and those from the year before (black) still hang on Stewartia pteropetiolata.
Stewartia pteropetiolata
Stewartia pteropetiolata
Stewartia pteropetiolata
Stewartia pteropetiolata
I know that the old original plant of Stewartia pteropetiolata had lost 20ft of its crown in 1990 and thereafter produced side shoots from the base which are now mature. What I had not realised until looking properly was that the old trunk had rotted and died completely between the new shoots. You can now see daylight through the old trunk at the base.
Stewartia pteropetiolata
Stewartia pteropetiolata
Stewartia pteropetiolata
Stewartia pteropetiolata
Note too how the bark structure has changed from the immature shoots to the more mature ones. A fissured bark but, unlike other species, not a peeling, flaking or exfoliating bark structure.
I have just written a new article on stewartia species at Caerhays so these pictures will be helpful.
Stewartia pteropetiolata
Stewartia pteropetiolata
Stewartia pteropetiolata
Stewartia pteropetiolata
Stewartia pteropetiolata
Stewartia pteropetiolata
Stewartia pteropetiolata
Stewartia pteropetiolata
A good young Magnolia nitida getting away well for once. We have failed with several in recent years all from seedlings grown here.
Magnolia nitida
Magnolia nitida
Evergreen Viburnum awabuki is new to us and only a year from planting out. Hillier’s say it is a form of Viburnum odoratissimum and this had occurred to me as well. I will photograph the true V. odoratissimum shortly.
Viburnum awabuki
Viburnum awabuki
Viburnum awabuki
Viburnum awabuki
This Rhododendron singogrande is too exposed to the wind. This has limited its leaf size greatly and wind damage is obvious on the leaves. However there is no reduction in the size of the many flower buds for this spring!
Rhododendron singogrande
Rhododendron singogrande
Rhododendron singogrande
Rhododendron singogrande

2017 – CHW
The large clumps of Rhododendron ‘Winter Intruder’ on the drive are now full out. The old Rhododendron nobleanums beside them are over having been bashed by rain, hail and north wind. Unlike some years they were never really out together.
Rhododendron ‘Winter Intruder’
Rhododendron ‘Winter Intruder’
Rhododendron ‘Winter Intruder’
Rhododendron ‘Winter Intruder’
Rhododendron ‘Winter Intruder’
Rhododendron ‘Winter Intruder’
Rhododendron ‘Winter Intruder’
Rhododendron ‘Winter Intruder’

2016 – CHW
Another magnolia is out, this time in the main clearing in Forty Acres wood. Magnolia ‘Ethel Hillier’ is a seedling of Magnolia campbellii ‘Alba’ collected from wild collected seed and named after Sir Harold Hillier’s mother. This is often confused with Magnolia ‘Sir Harol Hillier’, another near white ‘Alba’ seedling and named by Nigel Holman of Chyverton.
Magnolia ‘Ethel Hillier’
Magnolia ‘Ethel Hillier’
Magnolia ‘Ethel Hillier’
Magnolia ‘Ethel Hillier’
Magnolia ‘Ethel Hillier’
Magnolia ‘Ethel Hillier’

Camellia ‘Mary Jobson’ has one tit damaged flower by the side door. This x williamsii hybrid has some scent which makes it unusual. Mary Jobson was my father’s niece.

Camellia ‘Mary Jobson’
Camellia ‘Mary Jobson’
Camellia ‘Mary Jobson’
Camellia ‘Mary Jobson’


2004 – FJW
Mild – wet at night – snowdrops out – as is Winter Intruder, Camellias etc.

1993 – FJW
Snowdrops well out.

1987 – FJW
First snowdrops seen.

1963 – FJW
Another hard spell – pond partly frozen over. 10° of frost.

1932 – JCW
A lot of Camellia speciosa in flower, Hamamelis is very good, R mucronulatum wanes, some R sulphureum opening, we have had some good flowers off Caucasicum x for about two months.