13th July

FJ Williams Profile Picture
FJW 1955-2007
CH Williams Profile Picture
CHW 2015-
JC Williams Profile Picture
JCW 1897-1939
C Williams Profile Picture
CW 1940-1955

2017 – CHW

A surprising late flowering red rhododendron on the Rookery path which needs layering to ensure its survival. A very different colour to the ‘Harrow Hybrids’ but the hairs on the leaf petioles would suggest that it too is a Rhododendron auriculatum hybrid. Well worth propagating and preserving.

late flowering red rhododendron
late flowering red rhododendron
late flowering red rhododendron
late flowering red rhododendron
late flowering red rhododendron
late flowering red rhododendron
late flowering red rhododendron
late flowering red rhododendron

Painters at work on the Rabbit Warren.

Painters
Painters
And the digger hard at it on the new clearing above the castle.
digger
digger
More dead aucuba by the Green Gate. This phythopthera only apparently kills aucuba and we soon will not have much of this valuable windbreak left.
dead aucuba
dead aucuba
There are three big batches of hydrangeas on the bank by Green Gate. This lot are about 20 years old and thrive now with more light. Looking from the lawn they show up well, or would without the dead aucuba!
three big batches of hydrangeas
three big batches of hydrangeas
three big batches of hydrangeas
three big batches of hydrangeas
Just seen a bullfinch from the window as I write this. A once common bird which one now sees seldom here. Bullfinches were the detested pests before the First War as they were frequently found pecking and destroying camellia and other flowers in the garden. Some of the gardeners were even issued with fold up spud guns or 4.10 guns that folded into their jacket pockets while at work. Presumably a bounty was paid! Orchard growers in Kent certainly did in former years.
2016 – CHW
Off to Leslie Baker’s immaculate garden open day in St Austell to raise money for St Mewan Church. Many shooting friends present. Leslie is planning to turn some of the herbaceous borders into shrubberies to reduce maintenance in his dotage and we agree to swap clumps of herbaceous for shrubs in the autumn. Phlox ‘White Admiral’ is just coming out.  Phlox seldom look as good as this in pots!
Phlox ‘White Admiral’
Phlox ‘White Admiral’

Rhodohypoxis is a lovely alpine plant but only really grow-able in Cornwall in a pot as here. Not one for our catalogue although very good.

Rhodohypoxis
Rhodohypoxis

Not sure which Penstemon variety this is?

penstemon blackbird
Penstemon blackbird
Heuchera ‘Cherry Cola’ is very effective. We have stocked this for a couple of years but I have never seen it in maturity.
Heuchera ‘Cherry Cola’
Heuchera ‘Cherry Cola’
Heuchera ‘Cherry Cola’
Heuchera ‘Cherry Cola’
Hemerocallis ‘Autumn Red’ is one we can dig up and split to avoid buying it in for a bit.
Hemerocallis ‘Autumn Red’
Hemerocallis ‘Autumn Red’
An unusual oxalis which I have not seen before. It may well be Oxalis rubra from South America. Well worth growing for its leaves alone.
Oxalis rubra
Oxalis rubra
Oxalis rubra
Oxalis rubra

Another Penstemon which Karol may be able to identify from our website? – ‘Alice Handley’

penstemon alice Hindley
Penstemon ‘Alice Hindley’
A very pretty geum with yellowish new flowers turning orange with yellow flecks. Better than Geum ‘Totally Tangerine’ by far.
geum
Geum
The oxalis we all know and once stocked which is rather invasive with white flowers contrasting to the purple-black leaves. Oxalis purpurea from South Africa I am fairly sure.
Oxalis purpurea
Oxalis purpurea
A peculiar new hosta with crinkled leaves which I did not like but some might well!
hosta
Hosta
Thalictrum delavayi ‘Album’ at its absolute best. Four to six feet tall and perfect today.
Thalictrum delavayi ‘Album’
Thalictrum delavayi ‘Album’
Thalictrum delavayi ‘Album’
Thalictrum delavayi ‘Album’
Thalictrum delavayi ‘Album’
Thalictrum delavayi ‘Album’
What is this primula like thing flowering in July with ‘dock’-like leaves. Really quite nice despite the slug damage.
primula like thing
Primula like thing
The best and most perfect clump of Hakonechloa macra ‘Albo-aurea’ that I have ever yet seen. Leslie gets agitated when he finds a pure green shoot or two and quickly cuts them out while Myrna feeds the many fish in the nearby pond.
Hakonechloa macra ‘Albo-aurea’
Hakonechloa macra ‘Albo-aurea’
Hakonechloa macra ‘Albo-aurea’
Hakonechloa macra ‘Albo-aurea’
Hakonechloa macra ‘Albo-aurea’
Hakonechloa macra ‘Albo-aurea’
2015 – CHW
No entry

1927 – JCW
The Gravetye Gardener saw over 100 blooms on Mag parviflora open since the first week in May.

1922 – JCW
Only a few flowers open. No Auriculatums moving. American Pillars are good. No Buddleia.

1921 – JCW
Romneya coulteri at its best say 600 flowers?!

1920 – JCW
Fortunei are passing. Auriculatum and Decorum x Auriculatum coming on, these last promise to be green and just as late as the species. Plagianthus have been very fine. R ingersii over.

1917 – JCW
Fortunei have been very fine, are now fading. Brunonis at its best. No Buddleias. C Rambler is very good. One Auriculatum is starting. R mitricatum is opening also R mugorii.

1914 – JCW
R brunonis is over. Buddleia variabilis is open well. R magnifica is starting. One R fortunei is in flower in Beech Walk and the others over. C rambler fair. R auriculatum is just starting.

1913 – JCW
Just back from London and Scotland. R brunonis remains very good, R veitchii fair. Rhodo’s Ingersii, Maddeni, Cataubiense and Campylocarpum would give pollen (just a pinch on the Campylo and Cataubiense).

1912 – JCW
R brunonis has gone. A cyclamen or two show and so a Lapageria. Buddleia veitchii good. R magnifica starting. Wilson’s Hupei Fortunei’s just over owing to the heavy rains. R auriculatum is not moving.

1911 – JCW
C Rambler going back. Brunonis also. All daff seed sown a week ago, some of the two years old planted, most of the older bulbs moved. Buddleia at Hovel half open, the darkest form ten days off. A few cyclamen open.

1908 – JCW
C rambler at their best also Brunonis. Came from Scotland two days ago. All daff seed picked some [?] since. A long drought just broken, the rhodo’s seem to have set well for flowers as a result.

1901 – JCW
No Lapageria open, roses good yet. Planted most of the seed, well on with the moving of bulbs and seedlings and other.

1899 – JCW
Everlasting peas at their best, a few Lapagerias open.

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