24th July

FJ Williams Profile Picture
FJW 1955-2007
CH Williams Profile Picture
CHW 2015-
JC Williams Profile Picture
JCW 1897-1939
C Williams Profile Picture
CW 1940-1955

2020 – CHW

The first time we have seen seedpods on Sophora japonica ‘Sun King’.

Sophora japonica ‘Sun King’
Sophora japonica ‘Sun King’
Flower clusters in profusion not yet out on Aextoxicon punctatum.
Aextoxicon punctatum
Aextoxicon punctatum
Aextoxicon punctatum
Aextoxicon punctatum
Tilia endochrysea with another fine set of its beautiful (secondary) new growth.
Tilia endochrysea
Tilia endochrysea
And much slug damage to the leaves as we now discover is normal for this species.
slug damage
slug damage
Dacrydium cupressinum trailing in the sunlight. This should be too tender for us but is tucked away here in shelter.
Dacrydium cupressinum
Dacrydium cupressinum
Dacrydium cupressinum
Dacrydium cupressinum
A wild clump or two of Hypericum androseanum which is a native wildflower.
Hypericum androseanum
Hypericum androseanum
I had to go to the reference books to find out what this multi stemmed 8-10ft tall shrub was. Ptelea nitens. If crushed the leaves are highly aromatic but I did not know this at the time. I will need to go back and check I have this correctly named.
Ptelea nitens
Ptelea nitens
Ptelea nitens
Ptelea nitens
Cercidiphyllum japonicum ‘Glowball’ living up to its name with its secondary new growth.
Cercidiphyllum japonicum ‘Glowball’
Cercidiphyllum japonicum ‘Glowball’
Carpinus caroliniana from Mexico also with bronzy secondary new growth in profusion.
Carpinus caroliniana
Carpinus caroliniana
Fuchsia hatschbachii just out in Tin Garden. It should still be out at Christmas.
Fuchsia hatschbachii
Fuchsia hatschbachii
The young Magnolia macrophylla planted last year has made excellent new growth of 2ft or more.
Magnolia macrophylla
Magnolia macrophylla
Another very late flowering clump of Rhododendron maddenii still just out.
Rhododendron maddenii
Rhododendron maddenii
A veritable carpet of old leaves under Quercus acuta.
Quercus acuta
Quercus acuta
Loads of small root suckers 10 yards away (at least) from a small Sassafras albidum planted in 1991.
Sassafras albidum
Sassafras albidum
Eucryphia milliganii still the best thing in the garden today.
Eucryphia milliganii
Eucryphia milliganii
Secondary growth on Pieris almost as good as in the spring after flowering
Pieris
Pieris
Some of the Rhododendron ‘Polar Bear’ are almost over much earlier than usual.
Rhododendron ‘Polar Bear’
Rhododendron ‘Polar Bear’

2019 – CHW
One evergreen azalea (out of a clump of three) covered in small azalea galls from the leaf hopper insect.
evergreen azalea
evergreen azalea
evergreen azalea
evergreen azalea
Taxis baccata ‘Dovastonii Aurea’ with most attractive drooping young yellow new growth.
Taxis baccata ‘Dovastonii Aurea’
Taxis baccata ‘Dovastonii Aurea’
Taxis baccata ‘Dovastonii Aurea’
Taxis baccata ‘Dovastonii Aurea’
Manglietia moto (now Magnolia kwangtungensis) with its huge goose or duck egg shaped buds high upon the tree.
Manglietia moto
Manglietia moto
Rhododendron ‘Polar Bear’ nicely out over and above Georges Hut.
Rhododendron ‘Polar Bear’
Rhododendron ‘Polar Bear’
Rhododendron ‘Polar Bear’
Rhododendron ‘Polar Bear’
Six weeks after all the others have finished flowering a young Rhododendron stamineum is full out with especially bold yellow centres to the white flowers.
Rhododendron stamineum
Rhododendron stamineum
Rhododendron stamineum
Rhododendron stamineum

2018 – CHW
A trip to Tregrehan to study Fagacaea (oaks, lithocarpus, castanopsis and fagus) with Tom and Thomas Methuen-Campbell from Penrice Castle who are both far more expert on oaks than I am.
Quercus rehderiana
Quercus rehderiana

The full list of what we viewed can be seen if you click here but these were the highlights. Endless oaks are rather dull to most so here are a few flowers!

Itea yunnanensis
Itea yunnanensis
Calycanthus chinensis
Calycanthus chinensis
Calycanthus chinensis
Calycanthus chinensis

2017 – CHW
A trip to Eddington’s Nursery outside Nettlestone. Last year everything was new. Now the sample herbaceous border has run riot. Lots of new things to photograph discreetly as this is not hugely popular with the two male owners and partners. I buy a Melianthus major to make amends.Eucomis ‘Sparkling Burgundy’ is just coming out on huge stalks.
Eucomis ‘Sparkling Burgundy’
Eucomis ‘Sparkling Burgundy’
Eucomis ‘Sparkling Burgundy’
Eucomis ‘Sparkling Burgundy’
Crocosmia ‘Limpopo’ – newish in our catalogue but good.
Crocosmia ‘Limpopo’
Crocosmia ‘Limpopo’
Crocosmia ‘Limpopo’
Crocosmia ‘Limpopo’
Echinacea ‘Tomato Soup’ – stunning red.
Echinacea ‘Tomato Soup’
Echinacea ‘Tomato Soup’
Echinacea ‘Tomato Soup’
Echinacea ‘Tomato Soup’
Agapanthus ‘Inkspots’ – another new name to us. Not that startling.
Agapanthus ‘Inkspots’
Agapanthus ‘Inkspots’
Agapanthus ‘Inkspots’
Agapanthus ‘Inkspots’
Helenium ‘Sahins Early Flowerer’ – not bad! No earlier than the others here though.
Helenium ‘Sahins Early Flowerer’
Helenium ‘Sahins Early Flowerer’
Helenium ‘Sahins Early Flowerer’
Helenium ‘Sahins Early Flowerer’
Sanguisorba ?obtusa ‘Pink Feathers’ – very striking – could not read the full label.
Sanguisorba ?obtusa ‘Pink Feathers’
Sanguisorba ?obtusa ‘Pink Feathers’
Sanguisorba ?obtusa ‘Pink Feathers’
Sanguisorba ?obtusa ‘Pink Feathers’
Lespedeza thunbergii – a particularly good form but not the right colour for this species! Here a 4ft x 4ft shrub just coming out.
Lespedeza thunbergii
Lespedeza thunbergii
Salix bockii (alpine willow) – a new species to me. Easily mistaken for a podocarpus with its tiny leaves. Chinese and grows to 8ft.
Salix bockii
Salix bockii
Salix bockii
Salix bockii
Salix bockii
Salix bockii
Agapanthus ‘Lavender Haze’ – nothing startling but nice enough.
Agapanthus ‘Lavender Haze’
Agapanthus ‘Lavender Haze’
Agapanthus ‘Lavender Haze’
Agapanthus ‘Lavender Haze’
Agapanthus ‘Windsor Grey’ – dull white-grey flowers.
Agapanthus ‘Windsor Grey’
Agapanthus ‘Windsor Grey’
Agapanthus ‘Windsor Grey’
Agapanthus ‘Windsor Grey’
Miscanthus sacchariflorus – in full growth but no flower heads.
Miscanthus sacchariflorus
Miscanthus sacchariflorus
Miscanthus sacchariflorus
Miscanthus sacchariflorus
Agastache ‘Blue Boa’ – might have been blue originally but fading quickly. Taller growing than some.
Agastache ‘Blue Boa’
Agastache ‘Blue Boa’
Agastache ‘Blue Boa’
Agastache ‘Blue Boa’

2016 – CHW
What I think is Hebe carnea is flowering in the garden here with pink flowers fading to white. I could well be wrong! Not much else out after the tidy up though.
Hebe carnea
Hebe carnea
Hebe carnea
Hebe carnea
The huge Pittosporum tenuifolium looks well for its huge size with little die back from the top. We would be very visible without it.
The Trachelospermum jasminoides which I planted next door is scenting everything but covered in bindweed.
Trachelospermum jasminoides
Trachelospermum jasminoides
Agapanthus campanulatus ‘Rosewarne’ as good as pictured at Caerhays last week.
Agapanthus campanulatus ‘Rosewarne’
Alice’s jasmine (Jasminum officinale affine) has shed many of its flowers but there is still quite a show and a second most lovely scent to enjoy sitting in the garden here (far too hot to risk this for the last two days even if I had not been hard at a raft of paperwork).
Jasminum officinale affine
Jasminum officinale affine

2015 – CHW
Hydrangea serrata ‘Tiara’ is a taller growing form of serrata and quite pretty close up if you like tiny blue flowers.

Hydrangea 'Generale Vicomtesse de Vibraye'
Hydrangea
‘Generale Vicomtesse de Vibraye’
Hydrangea 'Generale Vicomtesse de Vibraye'
Hydrangea
‘Generale Vicomtesse de Vibraye’
Hydrangea ‘General Vicomptesse de Vibraye’ opens light blue in our soil and then fades to rose or light pink as here where both colours of mopheads can be seen at the same time on the same large clump by Four in Hand. Quite a spectacle today even if a very old variety. Planted early 1990s.

1980 – FJW
Last hay in First Corn cut. A late hay season generally but alright at Barton.

1929 – JCW
Plagianthus open, several Mag delavayi open, a good many Parviflora, some Hypoleuca. Eriogynums remain and Decorum x Auriculatum also Ungernii x Auriculatum. Rosa brunonis V.G, the best thing on the place.

1927 – JCW
Only a few Decorum x open, Plagianthus over. We lately had some nice Ungernii x Auriculatum open. Romneyas wet but fair.

1924 – JCW
Plagianthus very good. Buddleias good. Brunonis and American Pillars over. Decorum x Auriculatums very good more serviceable than Auriculatum and not so hard to please, they also hate sun on the young foliage. Romneya not very good yet, too much rain. Rhodo rhabdotum is astonishing.

1917 – JCW
The first cyclamen found open.

1898 – JCW
The first cyclamen in flower.

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