29th July

FJ Williams Profile Picture
FJW 1955-2007
CH Williams Profile Picture
CHW 2015-
JC Williams Profile Picture
JCW 1897-1939
C Williams Profile Picture
CW 1940-1955

2017 – CHW

Cannot keep away from Ventnor. So much to see!

A fine white lampranthus.

white lampranthus
white lampranthus
A 20ft tall flower on an Agave americana. You can see that the rest of the plant is dying off.
Agave americana
Agave americana
Kniphofia caulescens from South Africa at its best.
Kniphofia caulescens
Kniphofia caulescens
Kniphofia caulescens
Kniphofia caulescens
Canna ‘Bonfire’ full out.
Canna ‘Bonfire’
Canna ‘Bonfire’
Canna ‘Bonfire’
Canna ‘Bonfire’
Canna ‘Bonfire’
Canna ‘Bonfire’
Even larger and more mature flower heads on two more dying Agave americana.
Agave americana
Agave americana
Agave americana
Agave americana
Chitalpa tashkentensis flowering sparsely as a small tree on a hot dry bank.
Chitalpa tashkentensis
Chitalpa tashkentensis
Chitalpa tashkentensis
Chitalpa tashkentensis
Eucomis bicolor in an outstanding clump. Some flowers full out, some still coming. Looks like there is some natural hybridisation in the clump.
Eucomis bicolor
Eucomis bicolor
Eucomis bicolor
Eucomis bicolor
Eucomis bicolor
Eucomis bicolor
The largest Agave americana I have ever seen. 10ft x 10ft easily!
Agave americana
Agave americana
More dead and finished flower spikes on Puya berteronica.
Puya berteronica
Puya berteronica
Puya berteronica
Puya berteronica
Freylinia lanceolata in full growth. Too early in the year for its tubular flowers.
Freylinia lanceolata
Freylinia lanceolata
Freylinia lanceolata
Freylinia lanceolata
A flower bud on Hedychium gardnerianum.
Hedychium gardnerianum
Hedychium gardnerianum
An extraordinary Melaleuca alternifolia with ‘cotton wool’ flowers. Never seen before.
Melaleuca alternifolia
Melaleuca alternifolia
Melaleuca alternifolia
Melaleuca alternifolia
Melaleuca alternifolia
Melaleuca alternifolia
Priminopitys taxifolia with its juvenile new growth although this 10ft tall small tree looks half dead (as they always do).
Priminopitys taxifolia
Priminopitys taxifolia
Priminopitys taxifolia
Priminopitys taxifolia
Priminopitys taxifolia
Priminopitys taxifolia
Now a real find of something new for the 2018 catalogue. Melianthus villosus from South Africa. Melianthus leaves all right (although green) but look at the flower colour!
Melianthus villosus
Melianthus villosus
Melianthus villosus
Melianthus villosus
Melianthus villosus
Melianthus villosus
Melianthus villosus
Melianthus villosus
Muehlenbeckia complexa with a flower! No idea if it is a male or a female flower?
Muehlenbeckia complexa
Muehlenbeckia complexa
Muehlenbeckia complexa
Muehlenbeckia complexa
White lampranthus again.
White lampranthus
White lampranthus
Crocosmia ‘Honey Angels’ full out.
Crocosmia ‘Honey Angels’
Crocosmia ‘Honey Angels’
Various watsonia still just out in flower.
watsonia
watsonia
watsonia
watsonia
watsonia
watsonia
Crocosmia ‘Pauls Best Yellow’ also full out. Not hugely different to ‘Honey Angels’ in reality.
Crocosmia ‘Pauls Best Yellow’
Crocosmia ‘Pauls Best Yellow’
Crocosmia ‘Pauls Best Yellow’
Crocosmia ‘Pauls Best Yellow’
Odd shaped seeds on Cantua buxifolia – not seen before.
Cantua buxifolia
Cantua buxifolia
Cantua buxifolia
Cantua buxifolia
Watsonia seed nearly ripe.
Watsonia seed
Watsonia seed

2016 – CHW
The quest continues at Ventnor Botanic Garden.A superb new Crocosmia ‘Pauls Best Yellow’ which has green leaves unlike our Crocosmia ‘Solfatare’ which has bronzy leaves and apricot-yellow flowers.
Crocosmia ‘Pauls Best Yellow’
Crocosmia ‘Pauls Best Yellow’
Crocosmia ‘Pauls Best Yellow’
Crocosmia ‘Pauls Best Yellow’
Crocosmia ‘Pauls Best Yellow’
Crocosmia ‘Pauls Best Yellow’
An amazingly large specimen shrub of Bowkeria verticellata, the Natal shellflower bush, laden down with white flowers. This is new for 2017 in our catalogue and these pictures should sell a few!
Bowkeria verticellata
Bowkeria verticellata
Bowkeria verticellata
Bowkeria verticellata
Bowkeria verticellata
Bowkeria verticellata

Kniphofia bruceae had flower spikes of 4-5ft in height.

Kniphofia bruceae
Kniphofia bruceae
Bulbine frutescens was perhaps the nicest brand new thing I discovered today. Amazing fun to find such extraordinary new plants. This one the ‘African bulbine’.
Bulbine frutescens
Bulbine frutescens
Bulbine frutescens
Bulbine frutescens
The Cordyline australis disease which is killing mature plants in Cornwall is also present at Ventnor. This lot and several others stone dead since last year.
Cordyline australis
Cordyline australis
Then a really great find of a very rare new tree which is entirely unknown to me but certainly attractive. Mallotus japonicus, the ‘food wrapper plant’! Tenderish according to Hillier’s but worth a try at Caerhays. I have puzzled over this plant for several years thinking it might be a clerodendron species but suddenly now it has a proper label. Reddish new growth, oddly shaped leaves and peculiar flower spikes.
Mallotus japonicus
Mallotus japonicus
Mallotus japonicus
Mallotus japonicus
Mallotus japonicus
Mallotus japonicus
Mallotus japonicus
Mallotus japonicus
Is this a tall growing canna or a hedychium? No label of course and I do not have the reference book with me. I guess a H aurantiacum?
canna or a hedychium
canna or a hedychium
This is, I think, a large clump of the new aloe which Clare has found to add to the 2017 catalogue. Very vigorous and spreading here in full sun.
aloe
aloe
aloe
aloe
Grevillea ‘Florinda’ – a new one to me with rosemary-like leaves. Unusually late for a grevillea?
Grevillea ‘Florinda’
Grevillea ‘Florinda’
Grevillea ‘Florinda’
Grevillea ‘Florinda’
Finally an extraordinary cupressus-like conifer; Widdringtonia cedarbergersis, a South African native. You can see that it has male and female leaf forms on different branches on the same tree. It is tender and known as the Clanwilliam cedar.
Widdringtonia cedarbergersis
Widdringtonia cedarbergersis
Widdringtonia cedarbergersis
Widdringtonia cedarbergersis
Another oddity beside this conifer, Podanthus ovatifolius. It is a large shrub with leathery leaves and extraordinary seed pods which start yellow and then turn black. No idea about the flowers as not in any of my reference books.
Podanthus ovatifolius
Podanthus ovatifolius
Podanthus ovatifolius
Podanthus ovatifolius
2015 – CHW
Karol has been out with his drone taking fabulous pictures of the castle.
Caerhays Aerial
Caerhays Aerial
Porthluney Caerhays Beach Aerial
Porthluney Caerhays Beach Aerial
Caerhays in July 2015

After the rain the first mushroom of the season appears on the bank above the castle.

the first mushroom of the season
the first mushroom of the season
Below the greenhouse the very rare Rubus ichangensis is about to produce raspberries in large triangular trusses. I have never seen this species of rubus produce fruit before and there is clearly going to be a bucketful in a month or so. It is a climbing plant which clearly grows to 15 plus feet and enjoys crawling up through and over other plants. It is not freestanding.
Rubus ichangensis
Rubus ichangensis
Rubus ichangensis
Rubus ichangensis
Again the rain has induced activity in our earlier swarms of tiny frogs. They are all over the garden and are now about quadruple the size of a month or so ago. If only a tiny percentage have survived thus far there are still a hell of a lot all over the place. It is still hard to understand quite why they are so keen to move away from water (safety while they grow?) but there are certainly plenty of damp shady places in the garden and loads of insects.  A mystery to be resolved.
Rhododendron ‘Polar Bear’
Rhododendron ‘Polar Bear’
Rhododendron ‘Polar Bear’
Rhododendron ‘Polar Bear’
Rhododendron ‘Polar Bear’
Rhododendron ‘Polar Bear’
By Georges Hut some self sown seedlings of Rhododendron ‘Polar Bear’ growing out of the stump of a long dead Pinus radiata are just coming out. The very last big flowered rhododendron to grace the season. ‘Polar Bear’ will be out here and there in the garden right through to September when the last plants near the back yard flower. Tremendous scent. The pink form which grows at Burncoose has been over for a fortnight by the garden borehole. Somehow the pink ‘Polar Bear’ does not look right! I can take ‘white’ brown bears but not pink white ones!

A 2003 planted Fagus longiopetiolata is at last making some progress. You would hardly recognise it as a beech tree with its pencil like leaves and close knit branches. I do not think it will be a dwarf tree but it will have to get a move on or be overshadowed by the nearby evergreen Quercus stenophylloides; a Mexican (?) oak given to us by Alan Coombes in 2002. It is now up to 12 to 15 or so feet in rather less years.

Quercus stenophylloides
Quercus stenophylloides
Quercus stenophylloides
Quercus stenophylloides

Who says there is nothing to see in a woodland garden in July?

I have found out a little more about Mr Harrow and his mysterious late flowering ‘Harrow Hybrid’ rhododendrons. Very much a real breeder with links to RBG Edinburgh and held in high regard by early Rhododendron Society members (formed 1916). Perhaps the subject for another research paper one day. However I think that next summer’s articles for publication might be about acers, ilex or even the convoluted puzzles of the original unnamed Chinese michelias at Caerhays. Even duller than this year’s efforts I fear for all but the most enthusiastic garden historian in about another century. I wish we could find a graduate with six months to spare, real plant knowledge, and more time than me to really get to grips with the archive here. Perhaps upon my ‘retirement’ (I doubt)!

1929 – JCW
(Handwritten note attached to Garden Book page)
Seed to get later:
Specimens of Ekianthus.
9 Cernus rubens origin unknown
9 Himalaicus from Coombe Wood to H White and so here
9 Campanulatus from Rogers of Southampton
9 Deflexus Wilson 4336 from Watsons by seed
9 21656 Forrest.Rhodo 25581 Charitopes
Pink rogue in ?These to go to Edinburgh in July or in October.

1924 – JCW
Plagianthus nearly over though a late season for some things. Drive buddleias are good.

1923 – JCW
Go to Scotland this week, much as above, the Plagianthus and Buddleias are the best things by far. No Auriculatum is really moving yet.

1911 – JCW
A good few cyclamen are up. Buddleias are going back. Mitraria suffered badly in the long spell of dry weather, some lapagerias show, roses coming again.

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