13th June

FJ Williams Profile Picture
FJW 1955-2007
CH Williams Profile Picture
CHW 2015-
JC Williams Profile Picture
JCW 1897-1939
C Williams Profile Picture
CW 1940-1955

2020 – CHW

Cornus ‘Norman Hadden’ (Cornus kousa x Cornus capitata) is making a decent tree in Kennel Close and flowering nicely this year. It is growing right beside the C. capitata which makes for an interesting comparison.

Cornus ‘Norman Hadden’
Cornus ‘Norman Hadden’
Cornus ‘Norman Hadden’
Cornus ‘Norman Hadden’
Cornus ‘Norman Hadden’
Cornus ‘Norman Hadden’
Camellia ‘Kitty’ is the first plant you come to coming down the path at the 1970 planting on Burns Bank. Still properly in flower in mid-June! One to remember to take cuttings from in the autumn. I have checked the reference books and our old plan is correct in the name of this plant.
Camellia ‘Kitty’
Camellia ‘Kitty’
Camellia ‘Kitty’
Camellia ‘Kitty’
Catalpa bungei Duclouxii Group (as we are now told is the proper name and not Catalpa fargesii f. duclouxii) is now full out and very splendid. Not as dark in colour as the one at Ventnor above the tropical house.
Catalpa bungei Duclouxii Group
Catalpa bungei Duclouxii Group
Catalpa bungei Duclouxii Group
Catalpa bungei Duclouxii Group
Catalpa bungei Duclouxii Group
Catalpa bungei Duclouxii Group
Euonymus morrisonensis flowering better than I have ever seen before.
Euonymus morrisonensis
Euonymus morrisonensis
Euonymus morrisonensis
Euonymus morrisonensis
Euonymus morrisonensis
Euonymus morrisonensis
This is our other original Catalpa duclouxii. The old plant died but two root suckers are now 30ft tall and flowering at the tops although they are hard to see beside a taller Nothofagus. From a distance the flowers seem paler than the younger plant above.
Catalpa duclouxii
Catalpa duclouxii
I discover another nearly pure white deciduous azalea below the Kalopanax septemlobus but this one has a faint yellow flash which is not present in every individual flower. ‘White Swan’ or ‘White Lights’ is what Hillier’s implies.
white deciduous azalea
white deciduous azalea
white deciduous azalea
white deciduous azalea
Idesia polycarpa is full out and swarming with bees as you can see. Looking at the flowers and remembering that there were a few fruits last autumn I think that this is a dioecious form of this tree which not all are. The other trees are either too young to flower or too far away for pollination to have occurred if this was simply a female tree.
Idesia polycarpa
Idesia polycarpa
Idesia polycarpa
Idesia polycarpa
The original clump of Rhododendron griersonianum is flowering more profusely than usual and easily the best rhododendron show in the garden today.
Rhododendron griersonianum
Rhododendron griersonianum
Rhododendron griersonianum
Rhododendron griersonianum
Rhododendron griersonianum
Rhododendron griersonianum
A few flowers still (as usual) on Camellia ‘Mathotiana Rubra’ in mid-June.
Camellia ‘Mathotiana Rubra’
Camellia ‘Mathotiana Rubra’

The whole garden has perked up with the recent rain after a drought of six to eight weeks with only a single day of light rain. That is the end of hand watering young plants for a bit.

Another flower or two on a separate Rhododendron yuefengense. This one is a darker pink with nice pink striping on the outside of the trumpets.

Rhododendron yuefengense
Rhododendron yuefengense
Rhododendron yuefengense
Rhododendron yuefengense
Rhododendron yuefengense
Rhododendron yuefengense
A branch snapped out of the yellow Magnolia campbellii. The Quercus x turneri ‘Pseudoturneri’ has also blown over in the gales which came with the welcome rain. One of its main roots had rotted. No point in pollarding and righting it but this is a place for a good windbreak tree (as was the oak).
Magnolia campbellii
Magnolia campbellii
Three Rhododendron nuttallii are out now but one is a bit different and more like the Rhododendron sinonuttallii which once grew in the Burncoose conservatory. Despite its strong smell it had creamy yellow flowers fading to white as on one of the plants here. I thought it might instead be Rhododendron excellans but the pocket rhodo handbook says most Rh. excellans are in fact nuttallii. We will see as we planted three excellans in March by Georges Hut. I need now to hunt out Rhododendron megacalyx.
Rhododendron nuttallii
Rhododendron nuttallii
Rhododendron nuttallii
Rhododendron nuttallii
Rhododendron nuttallii
Rhododendron nuttallii
Rhododendron nuttallii
Rhododendron nuttallii
Buddleia loricata, mountain sage, just coming out by the shop. It hardly looks like a buddleia! I guessed Olearia at first. Another species to propagate for the catalogue which I suspect butterflies will like.
Buddleia loricata
Buddleia loricata
Buddleia loricata
Buddleia loricata
Buddleia loricata
Buddleia loricata
The successful hunt for the pure white deciduous azaleas of late caused me to notice a good clump of Rhododendron viscosum which are nearly pure white unlike the clump in Old Park. This lot are by the shop and generally go unnoticed.
Rhododendron viscosum
Rhododendron viscosum
Rhododendron viscosum
Rhododendron viscosum
Rhododendron viscosum
Rhododendron viscosum

2019 – CHW
A horrid NE wind and quite a bit of twig debris on the paths but, at least, more good heavy rain. Up to the Rookery to inspect this year’s new planting there for the second time recently. Quite sizeable branch debris here in the teeth of the wind.

Probably too cold and stupid a place to have put Merrilliopanax alpinus unless something has eaten the emerging leaves? Perhaps drought too but it is 85% dead. I think we have another in the frames to try out next spring somewhere rather better.

Merrilliopanax alpinus
Merrilliopanax alpinus
Magnolia sinensis x sieboldii ‘Jersey Belle’ with its first smallish flower. This is a good hybrid which we grow elsewhere here and is occasionally offered on the Burncoose website.
Magnolia sinensis x sieboldii ‘Jersey Belle’
Magnolia sinensis x sieboldii ‘Jersey Belle’
A good Melliodendron xylocarpum making headway unlike most of the others.
Melliodendron xylocarpum
Melliodendron xylocarpum
First flower on Illicium philippinense and the bronze new growth is excellent.
Illicium philippinense
Illicium philippinense
Illicium philippinense
Illicium philippinense
Cotoneaster fangianus just about to flower with light green rounded leaves on arching stems.
Cotoneaster fangianus
Cotoneaster fangianus
Cotoneaster fangianus
Cotoneaster fangianus
Euonymus wilsonii now in full flower and rather striking for a euonymus.
Euonymus wilsonii
Euonymus wilsonii
Euonymus wilsonii
Euonymus wilsonii
The new laurel hedge protecting the Rookery from salt laden westerly gales was planted this spring. Some drought casualties as it only went in the ground in late March.
laurel hedge
laurel hedge
The hedge of Ilex perado ssp. platyphylla on the other side of the same path is already doing its job about eight years on from planting.
Ilex perado ssp. platyphylla
Ilex perado ssp. platyphylla
The extended Rookery nursery bed pleasantly weed-free for this time of the year and with a good crop of new growth on scores of rhododendrons.
Rookery nursery bed
Rookery nursery bed

2018 – CHW
Away at a board meeting at Belvoir Castle. Our latest plant supply is now happily planted by the old monastic lakes at Croxton Park and the hydrangeas and gunnera are settling in nicely but it is still very dry in Rutland!Meanwhile Jaimie and his team have been busy at home.They have trimmed the elm regrowth by the now restored Nash arch on the Battery Walk.
Nash arch
Nash arch
Look at the views over Porthluney Beach from here.
views over Porthluney Beach
views over Porthluney Beach
views over Porthluney Beach
views over Porthluney Beach
The landscape trees planted in the Trevanion deer park above the beach are doing well.
landscape trees
landscape trees
landscape trees
landscape trees
First cut of the grass on the banks outside the front door.
First cut of the grass
First cut of the grass
Buddleia colvillei just out by the regular bonfire.
Buddleia colvillei
Buddleia colvillei

2017 – CHW
I had nearly missed the Styrax wilsonii still in the greenhouse too. The smallest flowers of all the species which we so far know here. We planted two others out but they are currently lost in the tall vegetation and we will not now complete this year’s planting plans until after the first cut. I cannot remember exactly where we put them.

Styrax wilsonii
Styrax wilsonii
Styrax wilsonii
Styrax wilsonii
Styrax wilsonii
Styrax wilsonii
I got a strange email from overseas after Chelsea asking if we had a plant which was a cross between an eriobotrya and rhaphiolepis. I said I had heard of it but that I had not seen it. Then I find a plant in the frames for planting out next year! Asia will need to tell me where it came from? It is called x Rhaphiobotrya ‘Coppertone’ which I suppose assumes it is a cross between Eriobotrya deflexa and Rhaphiolepis (perhaps) umbellata. I have missed the flower which was light pink and rhaphiolepis like but the leaves look more like a gordonia to me? So does the habit which seems to turn in on itself. Like all bigeneric crosses in the plant world it is rather odd and ugly. Or in the animal world come to that (eg labradoodles for starters).
Rhaphiobotrya ‘Coppertone’
Rhaphiobotrya ‘Coppertone’
Rhaphiobotrya ‘Coppertone’
Rhaphiobotrya ‘Coppertone’
Some of the ancient Azalea indica clump varieties in the Auklandii Garden are over, some out now and some still to show. Today we have red, pink-large single flowers and pink-smaller flowers. Quite a mixed large clump as you can see.
Azalea indica
Azalea indica
Azalea indica
Azalea indica
Azalea indica
Azalea indica
Azalea indica
Azalea indica

2016 – CHW
Work on the old kennels is nearing completion and is well underway on capping off and repairing the kitchen garden walls before the pheasant poults arrive in two to three weeks.Rothwell construction have moved on well considering how difficult access is. We now have a useful building for garden visitors and shoot party drinks but I really do wonder quite what ‘we’ (ie the taxpayers) are preserving for posterity that is useful in the kitchen garden walls themselves.
Work on the old kennels
Work on the old kennels
Work on the old kennels
Work on the old kennels
Work on the old kennels
Work on the old kennels
Work on the old kennels
Work on the old kennels
Work on the old kennels
Work on the old kennels
Work on the old kennels
Work on the old kennels
Work on the old kennels
Work on the old kennels
Work on the old kennels
Work on the old kennels

2015 – CHW
A few oddities to amuse anyone who thinks a spring garden has no surprises left!

Broussonetia papyrifera
Broussonetia papyrifera
Broussonetia papyrifera  – this is one of a pair of female plants with peculiar flower clusters. The Paper Mulberry.
Ilex latifolia
Ilex latifolia

Ilex latifolia – who would have expected a holly to be producing an abundance of red berries in June? Some are still green but most are ready for the birds who have scattered seedlings of this plant allover the garden in shady areas. The old original trees now look ancient and sick.

PRUNUS latifolia
PRUNUS latifolia

Prunus laurocerasus – one very seldom sees it set seed quite as copiously as this.

Tropaeolum ciliatum  – it never died down in the mild winter and is in full flower already.
Tropaeolum ciliatum
Tropaeolum ciliatum
TROPAEOLUM ciliatum
TROPAEOLUM ciliatum
TROPAEOLUM ciliatum
TROPAEOLUM ciliatum
Aesculus indica ‘Sidney Pearce’
Aesculus indica ‘Sidney Pearce’
Aesculus indica ‘Sidney Pearce’
Aesculus indica ‘Sidney Pearce’

Aesculus indica ‘Sidney Pearce’ – when you look closely some of the white flowers have pink centres while some are yellow. Male and female flowers together?

1918 – JCW
Much of our daff seed has been picked after a long dry period. Rhodo bloom done in by it. Foxgloves very good. A Arborescens is open in part.

1917 – JCW
I sowed some Cyclamineus seed today, some is unripe. Shrubs much as above. 40 Acre and pond shooting ride bit of valley very fine.

1916 – JCW
We are picking some daff seed. P. helodoxa is very good. The following rhodo’s are in flower – R brachycarpum, R brachyanthum, R zealanicum, R lepidotum, bits of Auklandii, various Azalea hybrids and Waterer hybrids including R picotee with one or two Maddeni hybrids.

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