11th May

FJ Williams Profile Picture
FJW 1955-2007
CH Williams Profile Picture
CHW 2015-
JC Williams Profile Picture
JCW 1897-1939
C Williams Profile Picture
CW 1940-1955

2017 – CHW

A breakfast meeting at the Eden Project to see the new Western Australian Garden opened by the High Commissioner. Breakfast was kangaroo sausages (vile) and a boiled egg in half an avocado (odd). Lots of time to photograph new (to me) Australian plants.

A Chorizema cordatum with flowers that we recognise but this is not a climber like the one we stock – Chorizema illicifolia.

Chorizema cordatum
Chorizema cordatum
Xanthorrhoea johnsonii – basically a huge grass with a trunk. One had a flower spike – very penile! Lots of nurseries used to sell this when we could import the trunks.
Xanthorrhoea johnsonii
Xanthorrhoea johnsonii
Xanthorrhoea johnsonii
Xanthorrhoea johnsonii
A novel Acacia glaucoptera. Acacia pravissima x10 leaf size!
Acacia glaucoptera
Acacia glaucoptera
Acacia glaucoptera
Acacia glaucoptera
An Australian dianella species with typical blue flower spikes.
Australian dianella species
Australian dianella species
Banksia menziesii
Banksia menziesii
Banksia menziesii
Everywhere you looked there were anigozanthus of every shape and colour. The ‘Kangaroo Paws’ are an acquired taste (like the sausages) which I have yet to cotton on to. Too tender for us outdoors in the main. We used to stock these but gave up despite one year of massive sales of these horrors at Hampton Court.
Anigozanthus
Anigozanthus
Anigozanthus
Anigozanthus
Anigozanthus
Anigozanthus
Banksia repens
Banksia repens
Banksia repens
Banksia occidentalis
Banksia occidentalis
Banksia occidentalis
Eucalyptus forrestiana – rather dull.
Eucalyptus forrestiana
Eucalyptus forrestiana
Chamelancium uncinatum – rather like a leptospermum in its flowers.
Chamelancium uncinatum
Chamelancium uncinatum
Callistemon ‘Kings Park Special’ – very special indeed – deado even! Always good to have a dead plant behind the speaker at a launch.
Callistemon ‘Kings Park Special’
Callistemon ‘Kings Park Special’
Acacia cyclops – good name.
Acacia cyclops
Acacia cyclops
Callistemon citrinus ‘White Anzac’ – yellow yes but white never seen before. This one living!
Callistemon citrinus ‘White Anzac’
Callistemon citrinus ‘White Anzac’
Callistemon phoeniceus – does not look like a bottle brush.
Callistemon phoeniceus
Callistemon phoeniceus
Orthrosanthus polystachus – a ‘sort of’ iris.
Orthrosanthus polystachus
Orthrosanthus polystachus
Gastrolobium celsianum – pea shaped flowers.
Gastrolobium celsianum
Gastrolobium celsianum
Dryandra praemorsa – presumably protea family.
Dryandra praemorsa
Dryandra praemorsa
A clump of Wachendorfia thyrsiflora just finishing flowering. At last a flower I recognise and we can grow but I realise I have stepped outside the Australian bit and am now in the Mediterranean plant area.
Wachendorfia thyrsiflora
Wachendorfia thyrsiflora
Wachendorfia thyrsiflora
Wachendorfia thyrsiflora
Euphorbia triangularis – I get the ‘triangular’ bit but it looks like a cactus. I have strayed into the US bit!
Euphorbia triangulari
Euphorbia triangulari
Euphorbia triangulari
Euphorbia triangulari
Leucodendron argenteum – one we stock and grow. Just about ok outside in Cornwall near the sea if you read our ‘Protea Care and Advice’ notes on the Burncoose website.
Leucodendron argenteum
Leucodendron argenteum
Leucodendron argenteum
Leucodendron argenteum
Penstemon spectabilis – Californian I believe.
Penstemon spectabilis
Penstemon spectabilis
Penstemon spectabilis
Penstemon spectabilis
Teucrium fruticans – another we sell and perfectly hardy outside.
Teucrium fruticans
Teucrium fruticans
Teucrium fruticans
Teucrium fruticans
Malva subobovata
Malva subobovata
Malva subobovata
Jacaranda mimosifolia – I have not seen this with a full woody trunk before. We stock this but I had just missed the flowers here in the Mediterranean biome. Surely it is a South American plant? (Yes – as the label admits.)
Jacaranda mimosifolia
Jacaranda mimosifolia
I thought these were lachenalia, a South African bulby thing, but the label says velthamia.
Velthamia?
Velthamia?
Velthamia?
Velthamia?
‘King Protea’; Protea cynaroides which we also sell.
Protea cynaroides
Protea cynaroides
Aeonium polyphylla with a gigantic flower stalk for a small plant.
Aeonium polyphylla
Aeonium polyphylla
Aeonium polyphylla
Aeonium polyphylla
Leucospermum cuneiforme – an attractive protea in flower.
Leucospermum cuneiforme
Leucospermum cuneiforme
This looks like baptisia?
Baptisia?
Baptisia?
Baptisia?
Baptisia?
Huge clumps of Geranium maderense in flower. Biggest I have ever seen by far.
Geranium maderense
Geranium maderense
Geranium maderense
Geranium maderense
What can one say of these horrors among the vines?
Horrors among the vines!
Horrors among the vines!
Quercus bushii? No, I am wrong, Quercus wislizeni? No label but we have one like this in Penvergate.
Quercus wislizeni
Quercus wislizeni
Quercus wislizeni
Quercus wislizeni

2016 – CHW (photos to follow)
A morning with KPK inspecting various medium sized building work jobs on the estate over the next year. The worst problem was the delivery van driver who clonked into the arch at the Top Lodge damaging his van roof quite substantially and considerably moving one coping stone. On closer inspection the cracking and movement of the stones extends all across the arch. A structural engineer inspects tomorrow. It is not going to fall down tomorrow but it presents a risk to the public one day if ignored and will probably cost £10k to dismantle and re-embed in place in the correct alignment. Whether the white van company will pay up or their insurers remains to be seen. Quite a row to come I expect and a pity we do not have a picture of the wrecked roof.Welcome warm rain this afternoon as the leaf on the trees fills out.Karol’s picture of the leaf stipules (scars on the leaf petioles) on our three ‘different’ ancient michelias are looking good. On Michelia floribunda the scars/stipules extend half way up the petiole (or so the reference books say) but on Michelia doltsopa only one fifth of the way up the petiole according to Magnolias of China, the newish Chinese reference book. I will share these pictures with you shortly and do not feel we have proved whether we do have a M floribunda or not. The paper which I have written on michelia naming and identification is coming on nicely.Below is a list of new styracacae varieties which arrived today from Mark Bulk’s nursery in Holland to add to our growing collection. Pterostyrax psilophyllus is particularly rare and has an odd leaf with three points at the end of it. I saw this at Windsor on Monday and had coveted it then but forgotten it was on order anyway since I had never seen it before.

Pterocarya pterocarpa

Pterocarya rehderiana

Pterostyrax leveillei

Pterostyrax psilophyllus

Styrax jap Columnar

Styrax jap Hyme

Styrax jap Snowcone

Styrax jap Jippei-Kawamure

2015 – CHW
Tom Hudson visits to view our growing enkianthus collection and to ponder the correct naming of some.  We hear the first cuckoo of the year at 4.30pm in Old Park.

The four ‘V’s bred at or selected seedlings from Esvelt Nurseries in Holland are strutting their stuff but there is little doubt that ‘Vesta’ is the best today.
Enkianthus ‘Vesta’ has long racemens of bell-shaped red flowers.  The four plants we looked at were laden to the brim with flowers and fully visible from a long way off.

ENKIANTHUS 'Vesta' 02
ENKIANTHUS ‘Vesta’
ENKIANTHUS 'Vesta'
ENKIANTHUS ‘Vesta’
ENKIANTHUS 'Venus'
ENKIANTHUS ‘Venus’

E ‘Venus’ was out first and its much paler striped and tinged pink flowers show in circular clusters.  They show up better as the plant comes into leaf and are half hidden when eventually the leaf is full out.

ENKIANTHUS 'Victoria'
ENKIANTHUS ‘Victoria’

Enkianthus ‘Victoria’ – is again quite a sight.  Its reddish striped bells are more elongated and not quite as far out as ‘Vesta’.  Today is the second best of the four but might well take the top prize in a week.

ENKIANTHUS 'Virgo'
ENKIANTHUS ‘Virgo’

Enkianthus ‘Virgo’ this is a much newer introduction to Caerhays flowering here (but not Burncoose) for the first time.  Paler and more greenish than ’Venus’ but still plastered in flower at a young age.My vote had previously always gone to the earlier flowering ‘Venus’ but not this year or not today anyway.  Venus is too far gone for Chelsea but ‘Victoria’ may well make a splash on the stand.  All the enkianthus should go onto the lorry tomorrow or Wednesday for the trip.  Last year they were shedding flowers and did not look that special on the stand.

ENKIANTHUS deflexus
ENKIANTHUS deflexus

One Enkianthys deflexus (which I could not find last year although I know we have at least three other mature-ish plants somewhere) is in the group of four different plants on the drive.  It is still in tight bud but you can see the tinge of purple at the base of the bells.  It looks true to name and Tom confirms the leaves have the correct hairy edges.

1994 – FJW
Still cool – one fine day out of 3 – flowers hanging on.1989 – FJW
10 days of dry hot weather due to end. New maples starting to grow.

1960 – FJW
First rain since April 17th.

1947 – CW
Picked good bunch of Tower, Triandrus, Jonquil 455, Green eye 308, a Poet 435. Flowered and good Rho auklandii x Eriogynum. X Auklandii, Augustinii and Davidsonium at their best.

1929 – JCW
Much later than 1929. Magnolia nicholsoniana shows colour, several Wilsonii flowers open. Double crimsons not yet open.

1927 – JCW
Roylii cinnabarinum are open and so Auklandii but [?] forms are over. Aureum is very good. Recurvas and daffs is all open. Iris germanica are open, R aureum is at its best and so Haematodes.

1914 – JCW
Daffs are all over – Auklandii’s nearly over. Hybrid Iris over, Yunnanense hybrids are right. Standish Devonshire seedlings right – Roylei and Cinnabar. are opening.

1904 – JCW
I picked three nice Recurvas seedlings not quite expanded. No roses except on the walls. I pavonia, R fortunei both open. Auklandii’s at their best. Recurvas all open.

1902 – JCW
Picked the first Fortunei yesterday, very few other roses, cold, picked I pavonia and one Lorteti.

1899 – JCW
R fortunei open. A good few roses.

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