28th May

FJ Williams Profile Picture
FJW 1955-2007
CH Williams Profile Picture
CHW 2015-
JC Williams Profile Picture
JCW 1897-1939
C Williams Profile Picture
CW 1940-1955

2017 – CHW

I set out today to inspect the styrax collection but they are still not quite out. Buds aplenty for sure but a week away. Then I thought to photograph what has suddenly shown up as dead now that all the leaf is out. The Quercus marylandica is now deceased above Higher Quarry Nursery. So is the clump of Paulownia tomentosa ‘Lilacina’ above the greenhouse. Very short lived trees which grow so quickly. One of the seven survives. Finally I settled on the new growth on the schefflera collection to amuse, delight or disgust you depending on your point of view!

We have two Schefflera taiwania. This is the smaller and younger one but the silvery new growth is impressive. Perhaps I am coming around to these ‘ugly beasts’ as the ornamental/architectural plants which they clearly are? We cannot get enough of them into the Burncoose catalogue for next year whatever I think.

Schefflera taiwania
Schefflera taiwania
Schefflera taiwania
Schefflera taiwania
Schefflera macrophylla has lovely brown ‘velvet’ on its new growth as it emerges above its gigantic leaves. A sure fire winner and seller.
Schefflera macrophylla
Schefflera macrophylla
Schefflera macrophylla
Schefflera macrophylla
Schefflera aff myriocarpa has light green new growth spikes and is doing fine. Not listed in ‘New Trees’ but from Crug.
Schefflera aff myriocarpa
Schefflera aff myriocarpa
Schefflera aff myriocarpa
Schefflera aff myriocarpa
Schefflera pauciflora was only planted this year or last but it too has a small flush of new growth. Oddly impressive?
Schefflera pauciflora
Schefflera pauciflora
Schefflera pauciflora
Schefflera pauciflora
We have one or two other species including Schefflera rhododendrifolia and Schefflera delavayi but I cannot remember where they are and need to hunt them out. Brain only half working still after Chelsea but all the ‘thank you’ letters now written and all potential new clients from the show written to as well. Quite enough scribbling for a bank holiday weekend. However I did enjoy the Exeter Chiefs win in the rugby championship final by three points in extra time. 20 all after 80 minutes. Tony Rowe, the owner, delighted and Robin Cowling (our friend) in tears on the Twickenham pitch.

2016 – CHW
A catch up with what the gardeners have achieved while we have all been away at Chelsea.They have nearly finished the laurel hedge below the ririeii opening along to the big michelia below the Donkey Show. An excellent job on a hedge that has not been cut back for 40 years. Quite a bit of space here for new planting next spring.
laurel hedge
laurel hedge
laurel hedge
laurel hedge
Rhododendron ‘Lems Monarch’ is just coming out where I parked the car as ankles still too swollen to walk properly.
Rhododendron ‘Lems Monarch’
Rhododendron ‘Lems Monarch’
2015 – CHW
A trip up the drive with the camera reveals elderly Rhododendron prinophyllums either side of the Four in Hand.  This is a late flowering US species of which there are several examples in the garden.  This one is early.  On the bank I spot the first small blue butterfly of the year but the dog flushes it before I can get a happy snap.

Rhododendron prinophyllums
Rhododendron prinophyllums
Rhododendron prinophyllums
Rhododendron prinophyllums
Azalea carpeted
Azalea –  carpeted in flowers
Azalea carpeted
Azalea – carpeted in flowers

Below the main fernery is one plant of an old but exceptionally carpeted red evergreen azalea.  It has never had a name but we did propagate it and there is a new clump in the Auklandii Garden.  Well worth a name if it has not got one and propagating.

gall on Camellia Lady Clare
gall on Camellia Lady Clare

Here is a large gall attached to a very late flower on Camellia Lady Clare.  Galls are produced by an insect to feed and protect their eggs and larvae.  Perhaps commoner on azaleas than camellias they do no long term harm and are easily cut off.

Enkianthus chinensis
Enkianthus chinensis
Enkianthus chinensis
Enkianthus chinensis

What we think may be a small growing, bushy form of Enkianthus chinensis on the drive is now fully out.  The colours are broadly similar to the two clumps photographed on Hovel Cart Road a few days ago but the habit is hugely different.  An odd plant which Koen from Arboretum Wespelaar may be able to help with now that I have written for help and advice on enkianthus.

Azalea ‘Bungo-nishiki’
Azalea ‘Bungo-nishiki’
Azalea ‘Bungo-nishiki’
Azalea ‘Bungo-nishiki’

In the rockery are two original dwarfish and compact azaleas.  I have never known the name and they are clearly Rhododendron indicum leaves.  The double frilly orange flowers are superb. Perhaps Azalea ‘Bungo-nishiki’ which is indicum x kaempferi.  A must to propagate anyway I do not recollect ever seeing this in flower before.  ‘Carpeted’!

Azalea 'Purple Triumph'
Azalea ‘Purple Triumph’

Next to it is the late flowering evergreen azalea which was always called ‘Purple Triumph’.  I may even have planted it 40 years ago.

Rhododendron haematodes
Rhododendron haematodes

One flower on Rhododendron haematodes.  This is a replacement for long dead originals.

Wisteria ‘Black Dragon’
Wisteria ‘Black Dragon’
Wisteria ‘Black Dragon’
Wisteria ‘Black Dragon’

Wisteria ‘Black Dragon’ on the gents’ loo just going over.  The flowers tend to be hidden by the foliage but the smell drowns out whatever unpleasantness the wedding party left in here.

cam massacred
Massacred camellia by Michael
cam massacred
Massacred camellia by Michael

Michael and the new gardener have massacred the old camellias (again) around the Stable Flat.   An excellent neat job which needs doing every 15 to 20 years.

Rhododendron ‘Sappho’
Rhododendron ‘Sappho’
Rhododendron ‘Sappho’
Rhododendron ‘Sappho’

Rhododendron ‘Sappho’ on of the old original hardy ponticum hybrids is nearly full out outside the back yard.  There is nearly an acre of this gone native in 40 Acres Wood.  The back yard clump was once a pen for my rare Mikado pheasants which died of a nasty disease nearly 40 years ago.

1930 – JCW
I leave for Scotland tomorrow. Auklandii remain very good, flowers as a whole have lasted very with good mild weather. The Enkianthus were never so good as regards the established plants. Magnolia x nicholsoniana i.e the big one, very very good.

1929 – JCW
About ten days behind 1915. Ovatum is mostly open. Roylei are ½ open. Mag wilsoni, parviflora and nicholsoniana are very good.

1915 – JCW
All the thorns are very good. Montana (white) and Chrysocom as good, also Azaleas. Rhodo’s other than Waterers mostly over except Ovatum, Roylei and Formosum.

1897 – JCW
The pink thorns are nearly over, we have picked about a third of the daffodil seed.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*