2nd October

FJ Williams Profile Picture
FJW 1955-2007
CH Williams Profile Picture
CHW 2015-
JC Williams Profile Picture
JCW 1897-1939
C Williams Profile Picture
CW 1940-1955

2020 – CHW

I thought it time to have a look again at our ilex species collection to see what had berries. To my surprise (and perhaps showing my ignorance) I find more in flower than in berry!

Malus x micromalus covered in small yellow fruits. When we saw this in flower earlier this year it was pure white and not pink as Hilliers state it should be (Malus baccata x Malus spectabilis as it was labelled when it came to us in 2005). Well worth Asia growing from seed.

Malus x micromalus
Malus x micromalus
Malus x micromalus
Malus x micromalus
Malus x micromalus
Malus x micromalus
Ilex brioritensis should flower in May to June according to ‘New Trees’ but here it is in flower with no fruits. We used to mistakenly call it Ilex dipyrena until corrected by Susyn Andrews in 2011. Another species in ‘New’ Trees which has been growing here above the greenhouse for 100 years and is now a large tree which we have propagated regularly.
Ilex brioritensis
Ilex brioritensis
Ilex brioritensis
Ilex brioritensis
Ilex latifolia is setting a good crop of berries on a young tree which Tom Hudson thought was correctly named.
Ilex latifolia
Ilex latifolia
Ilex latifolia
Ilex latifolia
The two Ilex dimorphophylla were a picture today as small upright shrubs as you can see here. One is about 12ft tall; the other 6-8ft only. Planted in 2006/7. What an attractive species this is. Small trees really rather than shrubs.
Ilex dimorphophylla
Ilex dimorphophylla
Ilex dimorphophylla
Ilex dimorphophylla
Ilex dimorphophylla
Ilex dimorphophylla
Ilex dimorphophylla
Ilex dimorphophylla
Styrax japonicus ‘Westpelaar’ fruiting away as a small young plant with its attractive brown leaves.
Styrax japonicus ‘Westpelaar’
Styrax japonicus ‘Westpelaar’
Ilex ficiodes also has flower buds which are not yet out and no berries. I have however seen flowers on this small tree in the late spring. Secondary flowering after a dry early summer?
Ilex ficiodes
Ilex ficiodes
Ilex ficiodes
Ilex ficiodes
First flowers on Osmanthus heterophyllus which is performing at the correct time of the year.
Osmanthus heterophyllus
Osmanthus heterophyllus
Osmanthus heterophyllus
Osmanthus heterophyllus
Flowers on Ilex cornuta as well. I do not ever remember seeing fruits on this species and Hilliers say they are ‘sparse’. There is another form of this species with a rather different leaf shape to check in the next couple of days.
Ilex cornuta
Ilex cornuta
Ilex cornuta
Ilex cornuta

2019 – CHW
daffodil bulbs
daffodil bulbs

The daffodil bulbs go in at the Tin Garden memorial planting. The varieties included (with breeders names and RHS awards):-

St Agnes – P.D. Williams 1926 AM April 1934

Beryl – P.D. Williams 1907 AM April 1936

Brunswick – P.D. Williams 1931 AM April 1947

California- P.D. Williams 1945

Halvose – P.D. Williams 1927

Lanarth – P.D. Williams 1907 FCC April 1936

Larkelly – P.D. Williams 1930

Nancegollan – M.P. Williams 1937

Parcpat – M.P. Williams 1937

Tresamblé – P.D. Williams 1930 AM May 1958

Jaimie has presented us with a large potful of another Hedychium species to go up on the top bank near the clump of white flowered Hedychium coronarium. This is the yellow flowered Hedychium gardnerianum. So we now have three species growing outside and a tender one in the greenhouse (Hedychium densiflorum ‘Assam Orange’, H. gardnerianum and H. coronarium). I need to bring over from the nursery Hedychium greenii (red flowers) and Hedychium aurantiacum (orange) to start a collection of these colourful and attractive autumn flowering plants which are easy to grow from seed.

Hedychium gardnerianum
Hedychium gardnerianum
Hedychium gardnerianum
Hedychium gardnerianum
Hedychium gardnerianum
Hedychium gardnerianum

2018 – CHW
The second and darker old Camellia sasanqua is now coming out.
Camellia sasanqua
Camellia sasanqua
Camellia sasanqua
Camellia sasanqua
The Hydrangea paniculatas on Hovel Cart Road have had the necessary haircut.
Hydrangea paniculatas
Hydrangea paniculatas
This laurel on the main ride was only cut back three weeks ago but it is already shooting away.
laurel on the main ride
laurel on the main ride

2017 – CHW
Hydrangea aspera robusta is at least two months later into flower than Hydrangea aspera villosa or Hydrangea sargentiana varieties. As such rather a gem to propagate.
Hydrangea aspera robusta
Hydrangea aspera robusta
Hydrangea aspera robusta
Hydrangea aspera robusta
Hydrangea aspera robusta
Hydrangea aspera robusta

2016 – CHW
I have bust the camera so you will have to put up with poor pictures for a bit as the old model is rather inferior. On the day I saw the first single pink Camellia sasanqua out by the front door Karol photographed Camellia [Karol to add] full out in the greenhouse. I now need to see how this compares to other years as a date for the first camellia flower?
Camellia sasanqua
Camellia sasanqua
Camellia sasanqua
Camellia sasanqua
Hydrangea paniculata ‘Vanille Fraise’ has got much redder in the last 10 days.
Hydrangea paniculata ‘Vanille Fraise’
Hydrangea paniculata ‘Vanille Fraise’
Hydrangea paniculata ‘Vanille Fraise’
Hydrangea paniculata ‘Vanille Fraise’
Tilia henryana on the drive does have ‘bristle like’ teeth on the leaf edges but is nothing like as bristly as the Penvergate plant. No flowers here unlike Penvergate although there have been in past years. Hillier’s says T. henryana is very slow growing but this plant certainly is not. Is it wrongly named? I think not on past autumn flowering.
Tilia henryana
Tilia henryana
Tilia henryana
Tilia henryana
Tilia henryana
Tilia henryana
Cotoneaster ‘unknown’ above The Hovel has large, oval, orange fruits but not in profusion and only in the centre of the large bush. This proves it is not Cotoneaster microphyllus which has reddish pink fruits. Could it be Cotoneaster perpusillus, a Wilson introduction? Very few cotoneaster species have orange fruits. Perhaps these will turn from orange to red later? Or is it Cotoneaster wardii or Cotoneaster sternianus? Perhaps just the very common Cotoneaster conspicuus (red berries) introduced by Kingdom Ward in 1925. Its size, age and prime location suggest a 100 year old Wilson or Forrest introduction and it does not really fit with the plants we sell as C. conspicuus in the nursery today. Please would someone put this plant out of its misery with a correct identification? There are more, better, pictures if you search the blog.
Cotoneaster ‘unknown’
Cotoneaster ‘unknown’
Cotoneaster ‘unknown’
Cotoneaster ‘unknown’
2015 – CHW
At last Hoheria sextylosa ‘Pendula’ is out after weeks of waiting impatiently. A wonderful drooping canopy of flowers so late in the season. Hillier’s says mid to late summer flowering!
Hoheria sextylosa ‘Pendula’
Hoheria sextylosa ‘Pendula’
Hoheria sextylosa ‘Pendula’
Hoheria sextylosa ‘Pendula’
Hoheria sextylosa ‘Pendula’
Hoheria sextylosa ‘Pendula’

Nearby is Hoheria sextylosa with a much more erect habit. The flowers are larger on the newer growth where a branch got hit by a tree and has then reshot than on the top of the tree.

Hoheria sextylosa
Hoheria sextylosa
Hoheria populnea ‘Variegata’ and ‘Alba Variegata’ which grow nearby (yellow and white edging to the leaves) have had no flowers at all this year. Both are very tender and defoliate a bit in the slightest frost despite being very well sheltered and mollycoddled.
Around the corner and, to my amazement, Eucryphia moorei is full out. I normally think of this as the first eucryphia to flower and I have certainly seen it out in May at Burncoose. Here it is positively the last. Beyond it there are just a few flowers left on Eucryphia ‘Nymansay’. Could it be that this species flowers twice a year or are there different forms which flower at different times. The original Eucryphia moorei below Slip Rail blew over in the 1990 hurricane but has reshot from the base while the plant featured here was grown at Burncoose and planted about 1995.
Eucryphia moorei
Eucryphia moorei
Eucryphia moorei
Eucryphia moorei
Eucryphia moorei
Eucryphia moorei

1914 – JCW
Cassia, lapageria, cyclamen, hydrangeas are all good. Clematis paniculata very good.

One thought on “2nd October

  1. Re post on 2nd October. I think you would find Hedychium densiflorum ‘Assam Orange’ hardy. I’ve had it outside here in Dorset for years (in well-drained soil) and it always produces masses of fruits, which actually last longer than the rather fleeting flowers. H. greenii I think is more risky.

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