4th October

FJ Williams Profile Picture
FJW 1955-2007
CH Williams Profile Picture
CHW 2015-
JC Williams Profile Picture
JCW 1897-1939
C Williams Profile Picture
CW 1940-1955

2020 – CHW

More hollies and cotoneasters on the list for today’s foray:

The clearance by the camellia piece is now complete barring digging out the stumps.

clearance
clearance
clearance
clearance
The prostrate growing Camellia sasanqua (name unknown) can now be seen properly.
Camellia sasanqua
Camellia sasanqua
Ilex spinigera from Windsor in 1991 with a Windsor label. We have inadvertently used our own label and incorrectly called it Ilex dipyrena. A few green berries here and there as we have seen before. A spreading shrub 20ft tall with a similar spread now.
Ilex spinigera
Ilex spinigera
Ilex spinigera
Ilex spinigera
Ilex yunnanensis with no flowers or berries. I first saw this at Rosemoor gardens and it hardly looks like a holly.
Ilex yunnanensis
Ilex yunnanensis
Cladastris kentuckea turning yellow quickly as it always does. Compare now to a week and a fortnight ago.
Cladastris kentuckea
Cladastris kentuckea
Cladastris kentuckea
Cladastris kentuckea
Cotoneaster ‘Exburyensis’ with its yellow berries just turning.
Cotoneaster ‘Exburyensis’
Cotoneaster ‘Exburyensis’
Cotoneaster ‘Exburyensis’
Cotoneaster ‘Exburyensis’
Ilex cornuta (BJWS 8756) has an upright tree like habit but no flower or berries unlike our other older shrubby plant seen recently which had secondary flowers.
Ilex cornuta
Ilex cornuta
Ilex cornuta
Ilex cornuta
Ilex cornuta
Ilex cornuta
Ilex kingiana with berries just about to turn colour. Laden as usual.
Ilex kingiana
Ilex kingiana
Ilex kingiana
Ilex kingiana
A 1991 Ilex lalifolia (I think) ex Windsor with plenty of green berries below Slip Rail. The large serrated leaves are similar, as are the berries, to the plant above the greenhouse which we agreed was correctly named earlier. Both our trees appear to be females. The berries will be orange-red and I will need to check this later.
Ilex lalifolia
Ilex lalifolia
Ilex lalifolia
Ilex lalifolia
Ilex lalifolia
Ilex lalifolia
Cotoneaster frigidus ‘Inchmery’ with more berries than ever this year. The berries are yellow but will eventually turn salmon-pink. After 30 years this is now quite a tree with a dense branch structure.
Cotoneaster frigidus ‘Inchmery’
Cotoneaster frigidus ‘Inchmery’
Cotoneaster frigidus ‘Inchmery’
Cotoneaster frigidus ‘Inchmery’
Cotoneaster frigidus ‘Inchmery’
Cotoneaster frigidus ‘Inchmery’
Acer palmatum ‘Sango-kaku’ has turned even more orange/yellow now.
Acer palmatum ‘Sango-kaku
Acer palmatum ‘Sango-kaku
A young Cotoneaster fangianus without any berries as yet. This was originally known as Wilson 331 according to the cotoneaster book.
Cotoneaster fangianus
Cotoneaster fangianus

2019 – CHW
Strangely the largest Schima khasiana seems to be taking a year off from flowering. I can locate no buds at all although Schima superba is now just showing colour at the top of the tree.
Schima khasiana
Schima khasiana
Aesculus parviflora is showing early autumn colour and the conkers which we saw earlier have either dropped or been collected already by Asia.
Aesculus parviflora
Aesculus parviflora
Quercus greggii was planted two years ago and is doing well with a little late secondary new growth. This was an Allan Coombes introduction and, I believe, a present to us. It is multi stemmed which I assume is normal? This species is not listed in ‘New Trees’.
Quercus greggii
Quercus greggii
Quercus greggii
Quercus greggii
Quercus greggii
Quercus greggii
Yet another Disanthus cercidifolius dead two years on from planting. Why do we have such a struggle to get this plant established? Another nearby is rather more lively. This must be the fourth or fifth failure over 10 years in deliberately different locations. What does it need? I asked several of those we visited in Sussex gardens in April but got no clear answer and saw it doing well in several different locations.
Disanthus cercidifolius
Disanthus cercidifolius
Disanthus cercidifolius
Disanthus cercidifolius
Plenty of seed heads on Magnolia rostrata but, as usual, no sign yet that they have swollen enough to actually contain any seed. I doubt they will.
Magnolia rostrata
Magnolia rostrata
Magnolia rostrata
Magnolia rostrata
‘They’ always say you should plant Embothrium lanceolatum in the worst possible poor and stony ground. Here, one year on from planting, on the stony rim of Rogers Quarry, is a fine example. 12-18in of new growth on two stems despite the dry summer and a hot location.
Embothrium lanceolatum
Embothrium lanceolatum

2018 – CHW
Autumn colour in the nursery.Fothergilla ‘Blue Shadow’ is even better with autumn tints now than in the spring.
Fothergilla ‘Blue Shadow’
Fothergilla ‘Blue Shadow’
Fothergilla ‘Blue Shadow’
Fothergilla ‘Blue Shadow’
Hesperantha ‘Oregon Sunset’ cheers one up as do all the kaffir lilies which we all used to call Schizostylis. Name changes of this magnitude are daft and confusing for customers.
Hesperantha ‘Oregon Sunset’
Hesperantha ‘Oregon Sunset’
Hesperantha ‘Oregon Sunset’
Hesperantha ‘Oregon Sunset’
Camellia ‘Dazzler’ now full out. Other Camellia sasanquas out today included ‘Hugh Evans’.
Camellia ‘Dazzler’
Camellia ‘Dazzler’
Camellia ‘Dazzler’
Camellia ‘Dazzler’
Cercis canadensis ‘Ruby Falls’ with its attractively mottled autumn leaves.
Cercis canadensis ‘Ruby Falls’
Cercis canadensis ‘Ruby Falls’
Cercis canadensis ‘Ruby Falls’
Cercis canadensis ‘Ruby Falls’

2017 – CHW
The very rare and equally tender Quercus fleuryii looked nearly dead since it was planted in 2011 but has suddenly produced a set of very late new growth. It is spectacular in colour but rather flaccid and limp. I do not think it will survive even the mildest frost this winter. Otherwise ‘curtains’ I expect which was what the donor told me originally.

Quercus fleuryii
Quercus fleuryii
Quercus fleuryii
Quercus fleuryii
Another (German) williamsianum hybrid up Hovel Cart Road has a few secondary flowers. The blue tits have stripped the flowers which we saw on another similar plant last week to get whatever nectar there was – not much I guess.
Another (German) williamsianum hybrid
Another (German) williamsianum hybrid
Another (German) williamsianum hybrid
Another (German) williamsianum hybrid
I missed photographing a single secondary flower on Rhododendron ‘Michaels Pride’ which I have never seen do this before and, worse still, the huge pink Camellia sasanqua just down from the castle side door. No flower at all three days ago when I looked. Today, in the sun, it is suddenly out all over. Earlier than last year I think but need to check. The Camellia oleifera is near but not yet showing colour. A week away perhaps.

2016 – CHW
The young rhododendrons in the frames have grown well and some are ready to plant out in the spring.
young rhododendrons in the frames
young rhododendrons in the frames
young rhododendrons in the frames
young rhododendrons in the frames
Sinowilsonia henryi has yet to flower but has had a good growing year. The leaves are huge and styrax like but with lighter undersides.
Sinowilsonia henryi
Sinowilsonia henryi
Sinowilsonia henryi
Sinowilsonia henryi
A self-sown rhododendron seedling on a tree fern trunk outside the potting shed is an unusual find. I wonder what it is as the leaves have some hairs and it definitely is not Rhododendron ponticum. Asia could pot it up.
A self-sown rhododendron seedling on a tree fern trunk
A self-sown rhododendron seedling on a tree fern trunk
Indigofera howellii ‘Reginald Cory’ is flowering for the first time in the greenhouse as the leaves begin to turn yellow. Not much different to Indigofera potaninii but a name given to a Forrest collection commemorating one of his sponsors.
Indigofera howellii ‘Reginald Cory’
Indigofera howellii ‘Reginald Cory’
Indigofera howellii ‘Reginald Cory’
Indigofera howellii ‘Reginald Cory’
Indigofera howellii ‘Reginald Cory’
Indigofera howellii ‘Reginald Cory’
Quercus stellata is in the old oak records here but has long died out. Here is a new addition to the collection to plant out next spring. Very recognisable leaves but another ‘new’ oak to me.
Quercus stellata
Quercus stellata
Quercus stellata
Quercus stellata
2015 – CHW
Camellia reticulata ‘Mary Williams’ has a few large seed pods which we must remember to collect soon.

Camellia reticulata ‘Mary Williams’
Camellia reticulata ‘Mary Williams’
Vitis coignettiae is starting to turn colour. The bloody thing has gone rampant and needs cutting down. Here it is all over Escallonia iveyi and Rhododendron ‘Cornish Red’. Not a bad plant if you like ‘rampant’ but likely to kill off its neighbours with a smothering embrace. That is a nice thought for the weekend as our 10 days of late summer come to an end with a vengeance.

The house martins have all left the castle now so the flies are coming into their own. It remains to be seen if Mr Rentokill’s new treatment around the windows will stop the normal October upsurge in cluster flies on the curtains in the tower and in the Rabbit Warren which is usually unlettable in October.

Vitis coignettiae
Vitis coignettiae
Vitis coignettiae
Vitis coignettiae

1996 – FJW
Trip around with J Parsons – flowers on Auklandii Garden Sasanqua.

1964 – FJW
Charles picked flowers from incinerator Sasanqua. I had seen flowers on the top of the plant a week ago.

1963 – FJW
Wet summer good for garden – in recompense for winter. Magnolia mollicomata (Ririei opening) and Robusta (new Bo-Peep) overseeded very badly. Strong roots on Stellata cuttings in mist in 5 weeks. Cuttings must be soft. Acacias on wall trying hard.

1900 – JCW
Came down for the election, cyclamen fair. The supposed C Dickens x has several up in its pan amongst seedling daffs. Roses quite nice.

1898 – JCW
The autumn cyclamen very good, also the Belladona and Per’s Ipomoea. Found a 98 seedling half grown x max with cyclamineus.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*