15th September

FJ Williams Profile Picture
FJW 1955-2007
CH Williams Profile Picture
CHW 2015-
JC Williams Profile Picture
JCW 1897-1939
C Williams Profile Picture
CW 1940-1955

2017 – CHW

Completing the annual tree survey in Burncoose Garden.

A big limb has cracked off an oak opposite the mist houses. A branch had been pruned out high up years ago and water had seeped into the next branch down. Not too much damage but it frightened the house visitors!

big limb has cracked off an oak
big limb has cracked off an oak
big limb has cracked off an oak
big limb has cracked off an oak
A few big seeds setting on Styrax obassia but not many.
Styrax obassia
Styrax obassia
The Cornus florida by the pond colours and curls its leaves for the autumn. Very attractive but no fruits on this 25 year old tree growing in poor soil.
Cornus florida
Cornus florida
Cornus florida
Cornus florida
Sorbus pseudobakonyensis fruits on a 10ft tall tree planted six to eight years ago. First time it has fruited outside the nursery I believe.
Sorbus pseudobachynensis
Sorbus pseudobachynensis
Sorbus pseudobachynensis
Sorbus pseudobachynensis
Cercidiphyllum japonicum ‘Strawberry’ showing superb autumn colours. It is very fine in new growth too which is where I had thought that the name originated. Not so sure now.
Cercidiphyllum japonicum ‘Strawberry’
Cercidiphyllum japonicum ‘Strawberry’
Cercidiphyllum japonicum ‘Strawberry’
Cercidiphyllum japonicum ‘Strawberry’
Cercidiphyllum japonicum ‘Strawberry’
Cercidiphyllum japonicum ‘Strawberry’

2016 – CHW
The great joy of gardening is to inspect recent new planting and see how well plants are doing.
Tilia mexicana is a species of lime which I had forgotten we even had but look at the growth since planting in 2011. It is a tree already with huge leaves and trailing branches. It only came into the country in 1991 and was collected by Martin Rix. This looks set to be a popular tree even if the botanists one day try to reclassify it as Tilia caroliniana.
Tilia mexicana
Tilia mexicana
Tilia mexicana
Tilia mexicana
Tilia mexicana
Tilia mexicana
Ehretia thyrsiflora was grown from ?Korean arboretum seed and only planted out this spring. It looked vigorous but tender in pots and may yet be but amazing growth this season none the less and a bronze hue to it. Too rare to be in any reference book and we have three more to go out.
Ehretia thyrsiflora
Ehretia thyrsiflora
Ehretia thyrsiflora
Ehretia thyrsiflora
Ehretia thyrsiflora
Ehretia thyrsiflora
This looks like another Xanthoxylum species but the plan needs updating. Horrid prickles but amazingly intricate leaves.
Xanthoxylum species
Xanthoxylum species
Xanthoxylum species
Xanthoxylum species
Xanthoxylum species
Xanthoxylum species
Quercus laurifolia was also planted in 2011 and has done well although I do not really see it as ‘laurel like’ at all. Does not look much like an oak either come to think of it!
Quercus laurifolia
Quercus laurifolia
Quercus laurifolia
Quercus laurifolia
The tree which has grown far and away the fastest in this area (25) is a sorbus which I believe is Sorbus scalaris. This is its first and only cluster of fruits this year. Probably the first it has had time to bother with after growing so fast.
Sorbus scalaris
Sorbus scalaris
Sorbus scalaris
Sorbus scalaris
Sorbus scalaris
Sorbus scalaris
Photinia villosa var coreana is even more plastered with fruits than in last year’s pictures. The spreading branches are drooping down with the weight of them.
Photinia villosa var coreana
Photinia villosa var coreana
Photinia villosa var coreana
Photinia villosa var coreana
The first time I have ever seen fruits on Viburnum prunifolium and you can well see why it has this name! A very odd shrub and although, or perhaps because, it looks unhealthy it has a fair crop.
Viburnum prunifolium
Viburnum prunifolium
Viburnum prunifolium
Viburnum prunifolium
Viburnum prunifolium
Viburnum prunifolium
Tilia cordata ‘Winter Orange’ is turning in colour to yellow and its orange new shoots are going from red to orange as they will be soon.
Tilia cordata ‘Winter Orange’
Tilia cordata ‘Winter Orange’
Tilia cordata ‘Winter Orange’
Tilia cordata ‘Winter Orange’
Tilia cordata ‘Winter Orange’
Tilia cordata ‘Winter Orange’
Carpinus betulus ‘Fastigiata’ was planted in 2009 and is romping away erectly as it should. The wind is showing off the undersides of its leaves nicely in the sun.
Carpinus betulus ‘Fastigiata’
Carpinus betulus ‘Fastigiata’
Carpinus betulus ‘Fastigiata’
Carpinus betulus ‘Fastigiata’
Sadly this sorbus has no label on the plan. Any suggestions anyone?
this sorbus has no label on the plan
this sorbus has no label on the plan
this sorbus has no label on the plan
this sorbus has no label on the plan
this sorbus has no label on the plan
this sorbus has no label on the plan
Sorbus gonggashanica was introduced in 1981 by Roy Lancaster. This was only planted in the spring but already a few white fruits flushed pink (or nearly / will be soon).
Sorbus gonggashanica
Sorbus gonggashanica
Sorbus gonggashanica
Sorbus gonggashanica
Carpinues japonica is a less well known hornbeam species but clearly hardy and vigorous. This was only planted in 2010. A spreading, flat top to the tree and large leaves.
Carpinues japonica
Carpinues japonica
Carpinues japonica
Carpinues japonica
Carpinues japonica
Carpinues japonica
This is Carpinus rankanensis with a more drooping habit which has grown more slowly since 2010.
Carpinus rankanensis
Carpinus rankanensis
Carpinus rankanensis
Carpinus rankanensis
The only really sick looking big plant in Areas 23, 26 and 25 is strangely Crataegus laevigata ‘Pauls Scarlet’. Leafless already and covered in white and yellow lichen (bad sign in a young plant) it has plenty of dieback but some this year’s new growth lower down. I fear the stake failed to hold it one winter and some roots got broken.
Crataegus laevigata ‘Pauls Scarlet’
Crataegus laevigata ‘Pauls Scarlet’
Crataegus laevigata ‘Pauls Scarlet’
Crataegus laevigata ‘Pauls Scarlet’

2015 – CHW
In the rockery are two more dwarf rhododendrons enjoying a second autumn flowering.

Rhododendron ‘Yaku Fairy’ has quite a good show but Rhododendron russatum has just a couple of flowers.

Rhododendron ‘Yaku Fairy’
Rhododendron ‘Yaku Fairy’
Rhododendron ‘Yaku Fairy’
Rhododendron ‘Yaku Fairy’
Rhododendron russatum
Rhododendron russatum

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