28th September

FJ Williams Profile Picture
FJW 1955-2007
CH Williams Profile Picture
CHW 2015-
JC Williams Profile Picture
JCW 1897-1939
C Williams Profile Picture
CW 1940-1955

2019 – CHW

Cotoneaster moupinensis covered in juicy dark black berries. I do not think we have admired this before.

Cotoneaster moupinensis
Cotoneaster moupinensis
Cotoneaster moupinensis
Cotoneaster moupinensis
Another final grass cut at Tin Garden ready for the planting of the FJW memorial gardens next spring. The daffodil bulbs from Ron Scamp have arrived as ordered. All JCW or Lanarth bred varieties.
Tin Garden
Tin Garden
Of course the rotary cutter breaks down as Tim starts what will actually be the fourth grass cut this year in Kennel Close.
Kennel Close
Kennel Close
Kennel Close
Kennel Close
It would be easy to be very cross with Ross for smashing our original (true) Magnolia ‘Lanarth’ when felling large trees nearby. Such is his skill and precision as a master forester and tree surgeon that the site is really not a mess and, anyway, the 1950s tree was growing lopsidedly in shade. It now has the chance to reshoot properly although we will not see flower again for quite a few years. Cherish the new planting area for next spring and say nothing. Two more big trees to come down still. Note the wires and harnesses and the split beech trunk still stands.
felling large trees
felling large trees
felling large trees
felling large trees
felling large trees
felling large trees
felling large trees
felling large trees
felling large trees
felling large trees
felling large trees
felling large trees
felling large trees
felling large trees

2018 – CHW
Off to the greenhouses to see what is new here.Styrax japonicus ‘Pink Snowbell’ has the most enormous seed pods for a young plant in a pot and enormous by Styrax standards too. Far from ripe yet but with darkish black colouring coming on the leaves. An attractive combination which I have photographed badly.

Styrax japonicus ‘Pink Snowbell’
Styrax japonicus ‘Pink Snowbell’
Styrax japonicus ‘Pink Snowbell’
Styrax japonicus ‘Pink Snowbell’
Acer macrophyllum showing autumn colour of sorts. The Oregon maple is not new to Caerhays but the old plant is dead.
Acer macrophyllum
Acer macrophyllum
Acer macrophyllum
Acer macrophyllum
Schefflera frangipanensis (?) was a gift from Blarney Castle but collected in the wild. It has seed heads forming but a new flower head appearing at the same time. Odd!
Schefflera frangipanensis (?)
Schefflera frangipanensis (?)
Schefflera frangipanensis
Schefflera frangipanensis

2017 – CHW
Not a good fruiting year for sorbus after the wet summer. This is what I captured on a gloomy, misty day.Sorbus commixta ‘Embley’ by the Top Lodge is the exception.
Sorbus commixta ‘Embley’
Sorbus commixta ‘Embley’
Sorbus commixta ‘Embley’
Sorbus commixta ‘Embley’
Cornus ‘Gloria Birkett’ is again laden with fruits which are turning quickly. This is a very desirable form.
Cornus ‘Gloria Birkett’
Cornus ‘Gloria Birkett’
Cornus ‘Gloria Birkett’
Cornus ‘Gloria Birkett’
Sorbus folgneri ‘Emiel’ is plastered in fruit just changing colour from green to orange.
Sorbus folgneri ‘Emiel’
Sorbus folgneri ‘Emiel’
Sorbus folgneri ‘Emiel’
Sorbus folgneri ‘Emiel’
Sorbus reducta (top grafted) has a paltry four fruits.
Sorbus reducta
Sorbus reducta
Sorbus ‘Pearly King’ has sparse fruiting but some are changing from rose to white with a pink flush. Not many though!
Sorbus ‘Pearly King’
Sorbus ‘Pearly King’
Sorbus ‘Hilling Spire’ has only two clusters of yellow fruits quite high up.
Sorbus ‘Hilling Spire’
Sorbus ‘Hilling Spire’
So a pretty poor show on the drive anyway. Sorbus ‘Golden Wonder’ has zero fruits and Sorbus forrestii is bare too. All these plants, and several more, flowered well in the summer. In north Yorkshire the rowans are superb this year.

2016 – CHW
Trochodendron araliodes has plentiful seed pods in Old Park but they are not yet ripe. Collect in about a month I guess.
Trochodendron araliodes
Trochodendron araliodes
Trochodendron araliodes
Trochodendron araliodes
Stewartia rostrata in Penvergate is plastered in red seed pods but here, unlike on the drive, the leaves are only just starting to turn their autumnal reddish-black.
Stewartia rostrata
Stewartia rostrata
Stewartia rostrata
Stewartia rostrata
Tilia henryana is plastered in flower and nicely scented. Strangely the plant on the drive has no flower at all this year and you could argue the leaf shape is very different. I saw a plant in Durham recently with no flower either and much larger leaves. Less energy into flowering and bigger leaves with less pronounced leaf spurs as a result? I will catch up with the drive plant soon.
Tilia henryana
Tilia henryana
Tilia henryana
Tilia henryana
Tilia henryana
Tilia henryana

2015 – CHWThe very first flowers on Camellia sasanqua ‘Rosea’ outside the front door. I may have failed to find a camellia in flower in August or July this year but I certainly have found a camellia flower or two in July in the past. Which other genus could claim a flower in 11 months of the year?

Camellia sasanqua ‘Rosea’
Camellia sasanqua ‘Rosea’
Actually you probably could find a rhododendron of sorts out in every month of the year but some of these would be second autumn flowerings.

Magnolias too probably span the full 12 months albeit only in a mild winter if you include Magnolia delavayi and Magnolia grandiflora and, more importantly, all the newer hybrids which do have a second flowering. I have featured these heavily in the past weeks but here is yet another: Magnolia ‘Star Wars’. Unusually this year the second flowering is rather pale as opposed to being much darker than the spring flush.

Magnolia ‘Star Wars’
Magnolia ‘Star Wars’
Magnolia ‘Star Wars’
Magnolia ‘Star Wars’

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