22nd July

FJ Williams Profile Picture
FJW 1955-2007
CH Williams Profile Picture
CHW 2015-
JC Williams Profile Picture
JCW 1897-1939
C Williams Profile Picture
CW 1940-1955

2020 – CHW

More investigation of Callicarpa. We have viewed two species where my identification was suspect yesterday but here are four more and one which I could not find. In theory we are growing seven species of Callicarpa.

Callicapra shirasawana at Tin Garden is a vigorous tall growing species which we have already seen with its splendid fruits. Here are its flowers and buds which are mauve-pink like many of the Callicarpas. However we do know that the fruits are a different colour to Callicarpa bodinieri var. giraldii ‘Profusion’.

Callicapra shirasawana
Callicapra shirasawana
Callicapra shirasawana
Callicapra shirasawana
The much better known Callicarpa bodinieri var. giraldii ‘Profusion’ is nearly over in two of the three Tin Garden plants. The flower clusters are larger and darker pink (as are the leaves) than any of the other species seen so far. The leaves have a pronounced purplish hue.
Callicarpa bodinieri var. giraldii ‘Profusion’
Callicarpa bodinieri var. giraldii ‘Profusion’
Callicarpa bodinieri var. giraldii ‘Profusion’
Callicarpa bodinieri var. giraldii ‘Profusion’
Callicarpa bodinieri var. giraldii ‘Profusion’
Callicarpa bodinieri var. giraldii ‘Profusion’
Callicarpa psilocalyx is clearly the most tender of the three species growing in Tin Garden and in the Isla Rose Plantation. Much dieback even after a mild winter and only one plant in the trios has generally survived. Vigorous new growth now from the survivors now but no flowers as yet. The foliage is distinct and different from any of the other species.
Callicarpa psilocalyx
Callicarpa psilocalyx
Callicarpa psilocalyx
Callicarpa psilocalyx
Another (the fifth) Crataegus with fruits – this one is Crataegus schraderiana which we saw nicely in flower this spring.
Crataegus schraderiana
Crataegus schraderiana
Crataegus schraderiana
Crataegus schraderiana
Still a flower on Camellia ‘Kitty’ in late July!
Camellia ‘Kitty’
Camellia ‘Kitty’
Then to the Isla Rose Plantation where there are three trios of plants growing in full sun.
Callicarpa japonica ‘Leucocarpa’ has white flowers and a dense rounded habit in the Isla Rose Plantation. This perhaps calls into question my identification of Callicarpa cathayana yesterday or perhaps both have white flowers? Hard to know when the reference books tell you so little.
Callicarpa japonica ‘Leucocarpa’
Callicarpa japonica ‘Leucocarpa’
However this compact clump, labelled Callicarpa dichotoma, has a small and dark tinged leaf form which is nothing like the supposed or guessed C. dichotoma which I photographed yesterday and no flowers out yet but buds to come in small clusters down the new growth stems. This matches the Hillier’s description and was previously known as Callicarpa purpurea which matches the leaf colour.
Callicarpa dichotoma
Callicarpa dichotoma
Callicarpa dichotoma
Callicarpa dichotoma
C. shirasawana and C. psilocalyx have been fairly recent purchases from Mark Bulk’s specialist plant list. Burncoose stocks C. dichotoma, C. japonica ‘Leucocarpa’ and C. bodinieri ‘Profusion’ but also Callicarpa kwangtungensis which has been planted here but appears not to have survived. I have a little more work to do at the nursery to check all these identifications and compare the flowers.

2019 – CHW
Huge seed clusters forming already on Lithocarpus pachyphyllus. The old record tree is plastered in these and some have already crashed to the ground in recent wind and rain.

Lithocarpus pachyphyllus
Lithocarpus pachyphyllus
One of the magnolias outside the back yard is laden with nearly ripe seed pods in profusion. The other three alongside have very few as they caught the wind when the flowers were out.
magnolias outside the back yard
magnolias outside the back yard
The rest of the day was spent finalising and signing off on Dad’s probate submission to HMRC. A huge effort by Edwina, our land agents and accountants which has taken six months’ work to complete.

2018 – CHW
Thinning in the 20 to 25 year old woodland in Brownberry Wood is now complete. These young beech trees have been decimated by squirrels over the years as you can clearly see here. This is why trapping greys is essential if there is to be any chance of a timber crop in 60 or 50 years’ time. Why do so few people understand this?
young beech trees
young beech trees
young beech trees
young beech trees
The big leafed rhodos are looking terrible in the nursery beds in the drought but Jaimie has now started watering to keep them alive. Rhododendron sinogrande was the great casualty of the 1975 drought.
big leafed rhodos
big leafed rhodos
big leafed rhodos
big leafed rhodos
Plenty of wild strawberries are the bonus for the grass cutting team. Over two thirds of the garden has now been cut and, with no rain in sight for at least another two weeks, there is little prospect of the need for a second cut in September (for most of it anyway).
wild strawberries
wild strawberries

2017 – CHW
Off to the Isle of Wight.Clethra delavayi is full out on Bond Street. A similar sized plant died of old age this spring by Lower Quarry Nursery after overflowering and overseeding copiously. 8-9ft tall and 6ft spread.
Clethra delavayi
Clethra delavayi
Clethra delavayi
Clethra delavayi
Clethra delavayi
Clethra delavayi
Clethra monostachya is flowering nearby in Bond Street below the dump for the first time I have seen it anyway. Very attractive flower and yet another genus to brighten up the woodland garden in July. 10ft tall and similar spread. Growing in shade here.
Clethra monostachya
Clethra monostachya
Clethra monostachya
Clethra monostachya
Clethra monostachya
Clethra monostachya
This is an elderly but nearly dead clethra (once one of three) which I believe was once a Kingdon-Ward introduction. Not out yet and neither are the other three species yet on checking.
nearly dead clethra
nearly dead clethra
nearly dead clethra
nearly dead clethra

2016 – CHW
A slow, hot five hour trip to the Portsmouth ferry. The UK Admiral’s Cup challenge (Land Rover sponsored) team are based in a brand new building beside the ferry terminal which was visited today by The Duke of Edinburgh. The five challenger yachts (if you can call them that) were having a practice race as we passed by with thousands of spectators in every conceivable sort of vessel. Apparently Ben Ainslie’s team won two races and were third in another two. Qualifying proper on Saturday and Sunday with the finals, if we qualify, next year in the Caribbean. Many millions of income for Portsmouth.

2015 – CHW
The hydrangeas on the drive by the Hovel are becoming a great summer spectacle just as I had planned. From the Hovel going upwards:Hydrangea ‘Ayesha’ – which exhibits pink and blue inflorescences on the same plant

Hydrangea ‘Ayesha’
Hydrangea ‘Ayesha’
Hydrangea ‘Ayesha’
Hydrangea ‘Ayesha’
Hydrangea ‘Ayesha’
Hydrangea ‘Ayesha’
Hydrangea ‘St Clare’ – with its blue and white picotee edging
Hydrangea ‘St Clare’
Hydrangea ‘St Clare’
Hydrangea ‘St Clare’
Hydrangea ‘St Clare’

Hydrangea ‘Taube’ – easily the best blue lacecap

HYDRANGEA 'Taube'
HYDRANGEA ‘Taube’
HYDRANGEA 'Taube'
HYDRANGEA ‘Taube’
Hydrangea ‘Fireworks blue’ – very floriferous and vigorous grower
Hydrangea ‘Fireworks blue'
Hydrangea ‘Fireworks blue’
Hydrangea ‘Fireworks blue'
Hydrangea ‘Fireworks blue’
Hydrangea ‘Fireworks pink’
Hydrangea ‘Fireworks pink’
Hydrangea ‘Fireworks pink’
Hydrangea ‘Fireworks pink’
Hydrangea ‘Fireworks pink’
Hydrangea ‘Hobelia’ – starts as a pink lacecap and fades to green and white. Tall growing.
Hydrangea ‘Hobelia’
Hydrangea ‘Hobelia’
Hydrangea ‘Hobelia’
Hydrangea ‘Hobelia’
Hydrangea ‘Hobelia’
Hydrangea ‘Hobelia’
Hydrangea ‘Fireworks’ – white but it only shows the flashes of red and orange later
Hydrangea ‘Fireworks white'
Hydrangea ‘Fireworks’ –  white
Hydrangea ‘Fireworks white'
Hydrangea ‘Fireworks’ – white
Hydrangea ‘Fireworks white'
Hydrangea ‘Fireworks’ –  white
Hydrangea ‘Libelle’ – the best white lacecap in shade
Hydrangea ‘Libelle’
Hydrangea ‘Libelle’
Hydrangea ‘Libelle’
Hydrangea ‘Libelle’
Hydrangea ‘Libelle’
Hydrangea ‘Libelle’
Hydrangea ‘Libelle’
Hydrangea ‘Libelle’
Lots more to come out still so more work needed to check the planting plans.

1987 – FJW
Harvest started – 18 degrees moisture – weather improving.

1934 – JCW
Much as in 1906 and 1907 a long very hot dry spell.

1925 – JCW
Daff seed has been gathered for some time, the Romneya, Buddleia, Plagianthus and D Ivey Escallonia are the best things for the show at Tregony.

1907 – JCW
L giganteum over. R brunonis at its best. All seed picked.

1906 – JCW
Buddleia variabilis is in flower. Have put out our two year old daffs. Sweet peas only fair. One or two late Lapagerias are open.

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