23rd September

FJ Williams Profile Picture
FJW 1955-2007
CH Williams Profile Picture
CHW 2015-
JC Williams Profile Picture
JCW 1897-1939
C Williams Profile Picture
CW 1940-1955

2019 – CHW

A sudden strong easterly wind has downed all the beech mast and sweet chestnuts all over the drive. This made me wonder if there were any ripe fallen acorns on Quercus lamellosa but sadly they had all fallen a month or so ago when still immature and not really anywhere near ripe. Conversely the large Quercus acuta above Rogers Quarry still has plenty of larger acorns still in place on the tree and not yet ripe enough to drop in the wind.

Despite being cut back in the spring Buddleia lindleyana has reshot vigorously and is now in flower. What a colour!

Buddleia lindleyana
Buddleia lindleyana
Ross has felled another large beech tree. Three more big ones, a sycamore and an ash still to go.
beech tree
beech tree
This Clethra pringleyi is still not quite out in flower although another plant has already finished. Too much wind to get a decent picture.
Clethra pringleyi
Clethra pringleyi
Clethra pringleyi
Clethra pringleyi
Styrax japonicus ‘Evening Light’ living up to its name. Wonderful near black foliage.
Styrax japonicus ‘Evening Light’
Styrax japonicus ‘Evening Light’
Styrax japonicus ‘Evening Light’
Styrax japonicus ‘Evening Light’
Light pinkish secondary new growth on Rhododendron rhabdotum with the odd ripening seed head below it.
Rhododendron rhabdotum
Rhododendron rhabdotum
Rhododendron rhabdotum
Rhododendron rhabdotum

2018 – CHW
Tiny cones forming on Saxegothaea conspicua on just the odd branch. Quite a surprise as I had thought that ‘Prince Albert’s yew’ had berries? The reference books say these cones are in fact soft and prickly ‘fruits’ so there we are. Well worth a look in a week or two as I have never seen this before on any of our several young trees or the record tree at Tregullow gardens. I should ask James Williams.
Saxegothaea conspicua
Saxegothaea conspicua
Saxegothaea conspicua
Saxegothaea conspicua
Malus yunnanensis var. veitchii with one crab-apple only left to see. The pheasants have eaten the rest. A Wilson introduction from 1901 planted here in 2001. First fruits that I have ever seen on this smallish and now multi stemmed tree.
Malus yunnanensis var. veitchii
Malus yunnanensis var. veitchii
Seed pods from last winter’s flowers on Polyspora longicarpa. The first time these have formed on this young plant while the buds are swelling too and will be out by November? Ripe and collectable in December/January hopefully or perhaps earlier?
Polyspora longicarpa
Polyspora longicarpa
Secondary autumn flowers on Styrax wilsonii which I have never seen before. This young plant has grown well with some shade in this year’s drought.
Styrax wilsonii
Styrax wilsonii
Styrax wilsonii
Styrax wilsonii

2017 – CHW
David West from Fromefield Nurseries thought this was Cotoneaster frigidus ‘Inchmery’ when I photographed it last year. The fruit is not plentiful and certainly is not ripe yet but it is yellow now and seems to want to turn pink. I must remember to send fruits to David.
Cotoneaster frigidus ‘Inchmery
Cotoneaster frigidus ‘Inchmery
Cotoneaster frigidus ‘Inchmery
Cotoneaster frigidus ‘Inchmery

2016 – CHW
A new to us Daphniphyllum glaucescens has made an excellent small tree. Very different leaf structure to other species and clearly likes being in full sun.
Daphniphyllum glaucescens
Daphniphyllum glaucescens
Daphniphyllum glaucescens
Daphniphyllum glaucescens
Daphniphyllum glaucescens
Daphniphyllum glaucescens
The rare Nyssa ogeche is also doing well beside it unlike the one on the drive which is much older but has constant dieback each winter. It has not sold well yet in the nursery so we need to see what this species can do in semi maturity to make us recommend it. Odd but distinct leaves with a blueish hue.
Nyssa ogeche
Nyssa ogeche
Nyssa ogeche
Nyssa ogeche
Nyssa ogeche
Nyssa ogeche
Sorbus ‘Elenarae’ has also been well nibbled by deer but it has most attractive spotted bark on the new growth together with reddish new growth. I need to look up who gave us this oddity or did I buy it? Not in Hillier’s or New Trees.
Sorbus ‘Elenarae’
Sorbus ‘Elenarae’
Sorbus ‘Elenarae’
Sorbus ‘Elenarae’
Sorbus ‘Elenarae’
Sorbus ‘Elenarae’

2015 – CHW

A few seeds and berries today.

Stachyurus praecox, although nibbled by deer, is displaying large green seedpods on long tassels. Strangely next spring’s new flower spikes are already much in evidence.

Stachyurus praecox
Stachyurus praecox
Stachyurus praecox
Stachyurus praecox

Sorbus folgneri ‘Emiel’ has fruits forming in profusion but they have yet to turn orange and red. One to look out for if the pheasants leave them alone.

Sorbus folgneri ‘Emiel’
Sorbus folgneri ‘Emiel’
Sorbus folgneri ‘Emiel’
Sorbus folgneri ‘Emiel’
Stewartia rostrata is starting to run its trademark autumn colour with leaves turning reddish black and its seeds developing red calyxes. I cannot think of another tree which turns this extraordinary colour and pleasantly early in the autumn too.  We have a whole section of plants to buy that are wonderful for autumn colour at Burncoose.
Stewartia rostrata
Stewartia rostrata
Stewartia rostrata
Stewartia rostrata
Stewartia rostrata
Stewartia rostrata

2005 – FJW
Picked the first Camellia sasanqua flower.

1998 – FJW
Harvest complete. Latest for a long time.

1917 – JCW
Just as above, the rhodo’s now open are Decorum, Neriiflorum, Scintillans, Felonateium, 10278, Flavidum, Intricatum, Rupicolum, Hippophaeoides, Trichocladum, Fastigiatum and Barum (=10423).

1916 – JCW
Hydrangeas, cyclamen and cassia are all good. Lapagerias nice, several (6-7) species of mountain rhodo’s in flower.

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