24th September

FJ Williams Profile Picture
FJW 1955-2007
CH Williams Profile Picture
CHW 2015-
JC Williams Profile Picture
JCW 1897-1939
C Williams Profile Picture
CW 1940-1955

2021 – CHW (photos to follow)

Hydrangea paniculata ‘White Lace’ has now turned a delicate pink in most of its flowers.

Hydrangea ‘Madame E Mouilliere’ with a second crop of new white flowers alongside the faded flush of its first performance.

Hydrangea ‘Hobella’ too has a secondary flush of flowers as a result of the wet July.

Hydrangea ‘Ayesha’ has just the odd secondary flower amid the faded remnants of its main display.

This is a hybrid climbing hydrangea which has grown several feet up a dead oak tree. I think it is Hydrangea serratifolia x Hydrangea peruviana but need to check.

This elderly Camellia x williamsii ‘Donation’ outside the back yard has recently had a vigorous haircut to rejuvenate it.

Azalea ‘Babeuff’ was similarly given a hard prune back with ivy and old dead bits removed. Already you can see the new growth emerging.

2020 – CHW

I went looking in a field which frequently has giant mushrooms in it but it had been recently grazed by cattle and these two were all I found. My new book, the Collins Complete Guide to British Mushrooms and Toadstools, suggests these are ‘Parasols’ (Macrolepiota procera). A fairly common mushroom but not clear if it is edible?

Macrolepiota procera
Macrolepiota procera
Macrolepiota procera
Macrolepiota procera
A good array of salvias in Jaimie’s new garden.
Salvia x jamensis ‘Hot Lips’ and Salvia ‘Amistad’.
salvias
salvias
Salvia ‘Amethyst Lips’ in a pot.
Salvia ‘Amethyst Lips’
Salvia ‘Amethyst Lips’
The newly planted Ternstroemia aff. chapensis. A new species here.
Ternstroemia aff. chapensis
Ternstroemia aff. chapensis
Ternstroemia aff. chapensis
Ternstroemia aff. chapensis
Schefflera macrophylla has died following its blowing over in a summer gale which broke its root system.
Schefflera macrophylla
Schefflera macrophylla
Gevuina avellana is not looking well after two dry summers. Only tiny flowers. Probably needs a hard pruning to reshoot from the base.
Gevuina avellana
Gevuina avellana
Schefflera pauciflora with seed heads forming.
Schefflera pauciflora
Schefflera pauciflora

And another one with almost ripe seed heads which are now purplish-black.A replacement Schefflera macrophylla planted this year.

Schefflera macrophylla
Schefflera macrophylla
The flower on Oreopanax incisus is now full out.
Oreopanax incisus
Oreopanax incisus
A roe deer buck has attacked a eucalyptus with its horns in the rutting season.
eucalyptus
eucalyptus
eucalyptus
eucalyptus
Secondary new growth with numerous flower buds on Paulownia kawakamii which I have not seen before. Only a few flowers previously on this huge tree in the last couple of years.
Paulownia kawakamii
Paulownia kawakamii
Paulownia kawakamii
Paulownia kawakamii
Berries on Cornus iberica. Deer nibbling here too.
Cornus iberica
Cornus iberica
Cornus iberica
Cornus iberica
One of Dad’s original Rhododendron ‘Red Centurion’ covered in secondary flowers. Again not seen previously.
Rhododendron ‘Red Centurion’
Rhododendron ‘Red Centurion’
Rhododendron ‘Red Centurion’
Rhododendron ‘Red Centurion’
Fruits on Vaccinum ovatum (?) – it may be another species?
Vaccinum ovatum
Vaccinum ovatum
The best thing in the garden today is Schima khasiana. I was very wrong to say it was having a year off flowering but, 10 days ago, there did not seem to be any obvious buds!
Schima khasiana
Schima khasiana
Schima khasiana
Schima khasiana
Schima khasiana
Schima khasiana

2019 – CHW
A search for fruits and berries on the drive.

Stewartia rostrata with plump seed heads which are nearly ripe. The recent strong winds have blown many onto the ground so Asia needs to keep an eye on what are left.

Stewartia rostrata
Stewartia rostrata
Stewartia rostrata
Stewartia rostrata
Stewartia rostrata
Stewartia rostrata
A few unripe seeds still left on Stachyurus praecox. At the same time the flower stalks for next year are fully developed and a couple have yellow flowers already out.
Stachyurus praecox
Stachyurus praecox
Stachyurus praecox
Stachyurus praecox
Heptacodion miconoides just going over. The branches are laden down with flower heads and seeds forming. A few moths and butterflies were enjoying the nectar but too quick to photograph.
Heptacodion miconoides
Heptacodion miconoides
Heptacodion miconoides
Heptacodion miconoides
A top grafted Crataegus x grignonensis laden with large red fruits which the pheasants do not seem to like.
Crataegus x grignonensis
Crataegus x grignonensis
Crataegus x grignonensis
Crataegus x grignonensis
A top grafted Sorbus reducta which the pheasants have found more attractive.
Sorbus reducta
Sorbus reducta

2018 – CHW
The Lapageria ‘Picotee’ has suddenly produced a huge cluster of flowers 10-12ft from the ground and growing up over some Camellia sasanqua. Quite the best it has ever performed.
Lapageria ‘Picotee’
Lapageria ‘Picotee’
Lapageria ‘Picotee’
Lapageria ‘Picotee’

2017 – CHW
Sycopsis tutcheri is doing well and the buds showing at the end of the twigs may yet turn into early spring flowers. It is clearly an evergreen species with a dainty leaf arrangement.
Sycopsis tutcheri
Sycopsis tutcheri
Sycopsis tutcheri
Sycopsis tutcheri
Sycopsis tutcheri
Sycopsis tutcheri
Lindera lancea (Lindera umbellata var lancea perhaps) is producing a wonderful show of yellow autumn colour. Planted in 2011 it is now romping away with next year’s new growth (or flowers?) clearly visible at the tips of the twigs. A hard frost could do some damage here.
Lindera lancea
Lindera lancea
Lindera lancea
Lindera lancea
Lindera lancea
Lindera lancea
Lindera lancea
Lindera lancea
Ilex cornuta is doing pretty well too nearby. A very dense habit indeed. Suitable as a hedging plant I suspect.
Ilex cornuta
Ilex cornuta
Ilex cornuta
Ilex cornuta

2016 – CHW
Just look at the multitude of flower buds for next spring on Paulownia elongata!
Paulownia elongata
Paulownia elongata
Paulownia elongata
Paulownia elongata
Enkianthus serrulatus has a very distinct bronze tone in the autumn. Earlier and perhaps better than other species?
Enkianthus serrulatus
Enkianthus serrulatus
Enkianthus serrulatus
Enkianthus serrulatus
A young seedling from our now long dead original Acer forrestii is doing well. We have planted many out but I can never find them. The reddish secondary new growth gives it away.
Acer forrestii
Acer forrestii

2015 – CHW

A good specimen of Acer campestre which I think I planted as Acer campestre ‘Carnival’ which is supposed to have creamy white margins to the leaves. These are nowhere to be seen today but white variegation is often irregular or patchy and may only be apparent in spring. The tree has a compact habit with delicate and intricate leaves which will soon turn yellow.

Acer campestre
Acer campestre
Acer campestre
Acer campestre

Cornus kousa ‘Wendel Weeping’ has a few smallish fruits but is not going to be anything startling in this department.

Cornus kousa ‘Wendel Weeping’
Cornus kousa ‘Wendel Weeping’
Cornus kousa ‘Wendel Weeping’
Cornus kousa ‘Wendel Weeping’

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