21st July

FJ Williams Profile Picture
FJW 1955-2007
CH Williams Profile Picture
CHW 2015-
JC Williams Profile Picture
JCW 1897-1939
C Williams Profile Picture
CW 1940-1955

2017 – CHW

At Burncoose today.

Cyclamen hederifolium out in the nursery already.

Cyclamen hederifolium
Cyclamen hederifolium

Odd to see mature seed heads on carpenteria so early.

mature seed heads on carpenteria
mature seed heads on carpenteria

Seed forming on Cardiocrinum giganteum in the show tunnel.

Cardiocrinum giganteum
Cardiocrinum giganteum

2016 – CHW
Trip to Burncoose to photograph more new plants for the 2017 catalogue:Hydrangea ‘Magical Amethyst’ – as its name implies
Hydrangea ‘Magical Amethyst’
Hydrangea ‘Magical Amethyst’

Hydrangea ‘St Moritzburg’ – quite nice

Hydrangea ‘St Moritzburg’
Hydrangea ‘St Moritzburg’

Crocosmia ‘Okavango’ – a nice orange

Crocosmia ‘Okavango’
Crocosmia ‘Okavango’

Rosa ‘Special Anniversary’ – quickly fades to pink

Rosa ‘Special Anniversary’
Rosa ‘Special Anniversary’

Tamarix ‘Hulsdonk White’ – just coming out. All other tamarix are pink.

Tamarix ‘Hulsdonk White’
Tamarix ‘Hulsdonk White’

Now off to dreaded Seaview on the Isle of Wight armed with a boot full of files to work through the next fortnight. Pray for rain and not a heatwave?

2015 – CHW

I have never really understood the origin of the very late flowering Harrow Hybrid rhododendrons. This is the best of several clumps and has layered easily on the drive. I can trace references to Mr Harrow in JCW’s notes in 1910 but nothing more specific. It must be a Rhododendron auriculatum crossed with a red to flower this late.

Harrow Hybrid rhododendrons
Harrow Hybrid rhododendrons
Harrow Hybrid rhododendrons
Harrow Hybrid rhododendrons
Harrow Hybrid rhododendrons
Harrow Hybrid rhododendrons
Cornus kousa ‘Gloria Birkett’ is just starting to drop. The bracts are enormous and have latterly gone a pale pink. This is a very impressive cornus in a prime position.
Cornus kousa ‘Gloria Birkett’
Cornus kousa ‘Gloria Birkett’
Cornus kousa ‘Gloria Birkett’
Cornus kousa ‘Gloria Birkett’
Cornus kousa ‘Gloria Birkett’
Cornus kousa ‘Gloria Birkett’

Also on the drive are two trees with attractive new growth. Quercus phellos has variable leaves with some irregular white spotting on older leaves. No sign of any acorns. Beside it is Tilia mongolica (bought from Duchy Nurseries at the end of a Royal Cornwall Show 15 or so years ago) with its unlime shaped leaves and pronounced reddish new growth. Not a huge tree by the look of it and we need to remove the two leylandii which are crowding it at present.

Tilia mongolica
Tilia mongolica
Tilia mongolica
Tilia mongolica

1933 – JCW
Ivey’s Escallonia is of the very best.
Ivey’s Escallonia is very good indeed. Some good Griersonianum hybrids to move near the Hovel after clearing all of the cotoneasters out.

1932 – JCW
Ivey’s Escallonia is nearly open, some fair Griersonianum, some useful Eriogynum. Big Mag parviflora is V.G. Romneya is good. Jasmine pillar V.G indeed. Fuchsia are starting to show a bit. Ungernii x auriculatum is opening.

1930 – JCW
Ivey’s Escallonia is the best thing today. Auriculatum, Decorums are good, some good Eriogynum. Fair R ungernii.

1926 – JCW
A few nice hybrid gladiolus. David Ivey Escallonia is very good. Decorum x Auriculatum good, one Auriculatum open. Plagianthus over, not much else except the Romneya and remains of Rambler Rose.

1924 – JCW
The Plagianthus are our best thing. The Auriculatum x Decorum very good but there is not much else but the American Pillars and the viola. This is the best growing year for rhodo’s that I have known.

1917 – JCW
Plagianthus lyalii is the best thing in flower. Wilson’s Fortunei hold on in the shade, and Auriculatum is moving and in two cases, open. The rambler roses are good all through the country, perhaps American Pillar is the best.

1916 – JCW
Rhodo ungernii – maximum, Wilson’s Fortunei, Keysii and a Viscosum all open. Primula lettonicera and Plagianthus lyalii are the two best things.

1915 – JCW
The Hypericum in the Cutting is very good indeed.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*