29th March

FJ Williams Profile Picture
FJW 1955-2007
CH Williams Profile Picture
CHW 2015-
JC Williams Profile Picture
JCW 1897-1939
C Williams Profile Picture
CW 1940-1955

2017 – CHW

This is the unnamed Symplocus species which Susyn Andrews will hopefully name and identify for us. It is forming a big tree.

unnamed Symplocus species
unnamed Symplocus species

The Korean bred Magnolia ‘Raspberry Fun’ is just coming out in Kennel Close. This smaller growing magnolia will have great public appeal and is a great improvement on ‘Leonard Messel’.

This is Symplocus dryophylla full out. The flower is perhaps not much different from the earlier unnamed one but the leaf, overall habit and size definitely is. This shrub is only 8ft or so tall.
Symplocus dryophylla
Symplocus dryophylla
Symplocus dryophylla
Symplocus dryophylla
The New Zealand bred Magnolia ‘Sayonara’ is nice enough hidden away by the Podocarpus salignus clump but easily superseded by Magnolia ‘David Clulow’ or Magnolia ‘Lotus’ which are much bigger whites.
Magnolia ‘Sayonara’
Magnolia ‘Sayonara’
Magnolia ‘Sayonara’
Magnolia ‘Sayonara’
Real bluebells – the first I have seen with perhaps just a hint of Spanish influence on the bank in thick grass and full sun above the front door. Early again.
Real bluebells
Real bluebells
Real bluebells
Real bluebells
I am pretty sure I photographed flowers on this Fuchsia magellanica var molinae after the leaves had dropped last November. Here it is again in late March with new flowers coming out as the leaves re-emerge. Amazing even for a fuchsia. Yes Fuchsia exorticatica would be out well before now but a South American species too from Chile and Argentina?
Fuchsia magellanica var molinae
Fuchsia magellanica var molinae
Fuchsia magellanica var molinae
Fuchsia magellanica var molinae
This salvia (or could it be a buddleia?) species came from Burncoose but we have lost the label. Quite pretty especially in bud. Is it Salvia interrupta as the reference books suggest? Help please. [See Andre´Johnke’s helpful response in the comment section below!]
salvia
salvia
The newly acquired (from Crug Farm) Aucuba aff. chlorascens is out in flower in the frame. An exotic flower close up which Asia thought initially might be an insect infestation! The leaves do look a bit chlorotic.
Aucuba aff. chlorascens
Aucuba aff. chlorascens

2016 – CHW
Planting day at Burncoose from 8am with, for the first time ever, David Williams in attendance. We place out 15 magnolias and a few rare oaks (including Quercus uvarifolius and Quercus myrsinifolia) and some scented rhodos on the drive. Magnolia ‘Burgundy Star’, a new red flowered hybrid from New Zealand, goes in above the tennis court.Camellia ‘Water Lily’ is another good, tall growing, upright x williamsii variety. Not as popular as it was. This one in the Burncoose Lodge garden. Magnolia ‘Sir Harold Hillier’ is flowering properly by the walled garden for the first time. Bred by Nigel Holman at Chyverton it looks like a good campbellii alba seedling really even if named after Sir Harold. More like the New Zealand Magnolia campbellii alba really and possibly the same! Both have a hint of yellow as the bud sheds its outer coatings.
Camellia ‘Water Lily’
Camellia ‘Water Lily’
Our layers of Rhododendron irrroratum from last year have failed and we must try again as this is an excellent form.
Rhododendron irrroratum
Rhododendron irrroratum
Rhododendron irrroratum
Rhododendron irrroratum
The biggest Magnolia sargentiana robusta is full out at the crossroads but then the bloody battery runs out and I do not have a spare.
Magnolia sargentiana robusta
Magnolia sargentiana robusta
We did find the first flowering of Michelia platypetala or perhaps it is Michelia macclurii which is what I remember it as (label gone). It has much bigger leaves than the Michelia platypetala which I photographed 10 days ago at Tregothnan although the flower is similar (I stupidly labelled it Michelia foveolata on the day which has a strong rusty red indumentum under the leaves). Whatever the experts may say it is one of three species of michelia/manglietia all planted at Burncoose which are doing really well in shelter. Planted about 15 years ago they are now all nearly 20ft tall.
Michelia platypetala
Michelia platypetala
PM is a meeting with the Environment Agency at Penvergate to view the £20k’s worth (their cost) of new sluice gate to control rainwater runoff in the summer and avoid animal excrement polluting the beach. The problem is that it is 150 yards away from where we all agreed it should go on the map. In consequence the runoff ditches which we have now to dig will not work properly as the sluice is too far downstream. The Environment Agency express no opinion. We also ask how we will get the sluice gate boards in and out properly when the river is in spate? A health and safety issue of course. I suspect this saga has a bit to run yet.
new sluice gate
new sluice gate
new sluice gate
new sluice gate
2015 – CHW
The garden party visit Tregothnan in a severe westerly gale. A large piece of scaffolding on the house falls down over lunch (in the excellent pub at Ruan Lanihorne). Evelyn Boscawen has a row with the scaffolders and asks our party if any of their photos show wonky scaffolding.
The Lanarth seedling on the Bowling Green is superb. A gift from my father in 1962 to Evelyn’s father, Viscount Falmouth.

1970 – FJW
1207 round the garden.

1960 – FJW
Mrs Stirling and her falcon came around the garden. The bird was restless and uninterested.

1958 – FJW
Very like 1928. Big Kobus still coming on.

1935 – JCW
No frost so far. Fuschias moving again. On the day before yesterday Mary saw 3 whales in our bay. Daffs well on.

1928 – JCW
Recovering from the big frost. The early Kobus is over, the late one is opening. Halleana under the nursery is good.

1924 – JCW
Much as in 1921 and 1923. Daffs in front of 1908 and of 1905, also of 1897. Magnolia kobus, the early one, is open and Magnolia halleana by the nursery.

1923 – JCW
Red Auklandii and white starting to open, only a few Reticulata but it is a bad season for them.

1921 – JCW
Big cherries not open, 5-6 of the species show flower. Red Auklandii x at their best. White Auklandii x about five days behind them. C reticulata at its very best.

1912 – JCW
Daffs have begun to wane, though Poets are to come. Cherries 113 are open.

1911 – JCW
A fair lot of colour open in Tin Garden, no real poets. R ciliatum going back. C indivisa very nice.

1908 – JCW
Kin A’s all out, plenty of seedling daffs, am sending several colour things to Dawson for London. M halleana a few open, shilsonii going back. Our show is 8 days off. P Mary well out, Monarch hardly.

1905 – JCW
Weardale, Monarch, Firebrand and White Lady are well out, also a poet or two. The show is on April 4th.

1901 – JCW
A heavy fall of snow, say three inches.

1899 – JCW
Golden Bell, Emperor and Horsfieldii most of them opening, a few Princep M, 116 several, Commodore most, and the early Poeticus, with Dante.

1897 – JCW
Wilsoni, Major and Auratius all out, also Mrs Thompson.

One thought on “29th March

  1. Hello,
    the plant in question looks very much like Salvia leucantha in its true form. This is quite a rare plant now, being overshadowed by all its colourful forms that are more widely grown than the species itself. Salvia interrupta is very different. It has large purple blue flowers that open out flat and the leaves are much broader.

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